0

Judge less, help more: a case against official or unofficial reporting of social distancing breaches

french flag pastel

Today’s number 1 health priority is to flatten the curve of Covid-19 infection. We’ve all heard it: stay home, save lives.

Yes indeed. If you can stay home, not order anything from anywhere, avoid going to the shops, not go out in any circumstances, not meet anyone, by all means, please do so. Yet at a time when we need even more solidarity, some are using the argument of solidarity to do what they do best: judge others from the comfort of their privilege. Which, as a result, reinforces the inequalities they work so hard to deny in the first place.

It is important to highlight individual responsibility, because it matters. A lot. Not everything is due to a vague “system”, which would mean that no one is ever to blame for their actions (“It’s not my fault, the system made me do it”). However, at the same time, individual responsibility doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It is shaped by many different factors: social, economical, political, familial, …

Like me, you’ve all seen/heard it: people call the police to report that their neighbours are douchebags for going out when they don’t absolutely need to. People put up pictures on social media of random joggers (sometimes taken months ago, by the way, but whatever…). People blame friends who still meet despite being told repeatedly they shouldn’t do so.

Sometimes, using the argument of “solidarity” to blame people who need it most.

I won’t even start with how tragic it is, once again, to witness the hypocrisy; people who usually don’t report domestic violence they know of as “they don”t want to be intrusive”, are among the first ones to pick up the phone to call the police and say that a dangerous group of at least three teenagers are currently… chatting in a park! God forbid! No, let’s not even go there. Let’s not even talk about another hypocrisy: people “clapping for carers” every Thursday at 8pm, but calling the police to say someone is their area is “always going out”… They’re a nurse, but get this: they go out even when they’re not working. Well done, Sherlock. So it’s okay going out to save your ass, but going out to process it all, after weeks of dealing with fear and death, isn’t? Again, I won’t even go there. But let’s talk about some issues at stake here.

Firstly, it seems impossible for some to accept that having the absolute same objective in mind, we genuinely might try to reach it by taking different directions. For instance, I made the choice of not ordering anything by post, when I could, for weeks. I believe it was the best I could do to support my community. Others have chosen, on the contrary, to order food, books, IT stuff, you name it, either because they wanted to help small businesses within the community, or because they needed it to implement the rules of social distancing. Yes, I had a webcam long before all of this started. Some didn’t. Yes, I have enough books to keep me in lockdown for two years. Some don’t. I don’t think never ordering non-essential things right now is the best and only way to try and take part in this collective effort. Surely, it’s a little bit more complicated than that.

Secondly, and this is really upsetting me, we act as if we all were in the same situation, and all had the same needs… We don’t. And I’m not only talking about money or space here. Once again people living with mental illnesses and disorders are being invisibilised. Don’t get me wrong, I can’t say it enough: the absolute priority right now, in the name of public health, is to do anything we can to flatten the curve of coronavirus. Health systems in any country won’t be able to cope otherwise. But people are living with other illnesses, which haven’t vanished all of a sudden.

It might be annoying for you to stay home. It can be hell for other people. Sorry, you just can’t compare the two. Like anyone interested in mental health, I’ve been extremely worried, for weeks, about the impact this necessary social distancing and lockdown will have on people suffering from OCD, depression, claustrophobia, etc. I pray every day that people don’t become more suicidal… So if someone is having dark thoughts and need to order whatever from Amazon in order not to put themselves at immediate risk, I’m not judging that. I’d rather judge all the companies who’ve kept their employees working for so long without any safety measures… Likewise, some people are unfortunately living in extremely toxic environments. They experience domestic abuse. If they need to go out three times a day to avoid their abusive partner or father, again, I fail to see how they are to blame. And you think domestic abuse is “obvious”? That you would know, if someone in your neighbourhood or non-immediate family was being abused? All studies have proven you’re wrong. Violence, especially towards women and children, exists everywhere – women and children with disabilities are particularly at risk. Let’s not forget either homophobia and transphobia, which for many young people especially, turns “home” into the least safe of places. Don’t think for one minute that because someone “seems fine”, it doesn’t mean they aren’t struggling every single day, either within their own minds or with others.

I’m not only talking about immediate danger. We all know mental health is a long-term issue. Some people today are trying to prevent feeling overwhelmed or burnt out in a few months. Their choices may not be the same as yours, but if that’s what they need in order to stay safe, then so be it. Apparently we need to say it again: health isn’t just physical. It’s mental, too.

I supported the lockdown before it was implemented in the UK. I believe it’s the only way we can vaguely try and control the situation. But this has never given me the arrogance of believing anyone else going out was a selfish bastard, as I see every day on social media… Sure, some people are selfish, and don’t care putting other people’s lives at risk for their own petty comfort. I hate them. Yes, I do, even though “hate” doesn’t really promote kindness, and I’m all for kindness and understanding. Look: I may be naive, but I want to believe that the vast majority of people are doing the best they can. The best they can isn’t the best you can, is all. We don’t all live in (and with…) the same conditions.

I’ve been out twice in seven weeks. Sure, I miss being able to go out. But come on, I’m going to start whining when I live in a big house and have a fucking garden? The very fact that I have several rooms, and not just the one, and that I only have to share that space with my partner, no other family members, is luxury. I can be in a room on my own – and not even a bedroom – for hours at a time, all while being self-isolating. So if people need to go out at times, because they’re feeling overwhelmed by the presence of their children, parents, siblings, then I’d rather they go out reasonably (and I’m not the one defining what is reasonable) than start being depressed, or – let’s not pretend we don’t know this happens – aggressive towards others or themselves.

It’s not just a question of living in a big flat with a balcony. Some people have disorders that are made way worse at the moment. Actually, some people who’d never thought they were “the anxious type” (a reminder that it can happen to all of us, there’s no definite “anxious type”) are developing disorders such as OCD. And in a way, how can we escape it, in such circumstances? When do you know disinfecting your house is just “what you need to do” and when you’re going overboard, feeding new compulsions? As someone living with OCD (especially checking compulsions), I know it’s hard enough to know in a non-pandemic context, so…
Likewise, we’re bombarded with tips about how “not to get fat during the lockdown”. Gosh. Sure, reinforcing fatphobia, in addition to always being a shit idea anyway, is great when people are stuck at home and therefore perhaps more likely to develop, without even noticing, eating disorders… And how about the vast amount of people experiencing grief right now? It’s awful enough at anytime… But to know you can’t even visit a loved one who’s sick… That you can’t even say goodbye… Well, these people, for all I care, can go to the park for four hours if that’s why they need.

I just wish we dropped the whole my-neighbour-is-an-asshole set of mind, and move to this one instead: most people are doing the best they can with what they’ve got. And yes, even when doing so, they’ll make mistakes. But some things are not mistakes: they’re just not the thing you would have done.

Most people right now, I believe, are feeling guilty all the time. I’ll take food shopping as an example. You feel that if you go for your weekly, bi-weekly or monthly shopping, you might as well buy more items, because it means fewer visits to the shop. And yet, you can’t, because you feel people would think you’re stockpiling… It’s a lose-lose, feel crap-feel shit situation. Same thing for online shopping, drive service or deliveries: “I won’t go to the shop, at least that’s one less person there. I’ll order in or do a click and collect. But then, someone else than me is taking that risk? Because at some point, the items have to be brought to me…”

We’ve rarely talked about public health so much. Some people are discovering for the first time why solidarity is so crucial in this area (yes, please don’t vote Conservatives, or any party promoting private health care systems). I won’t say “at least that’s good”. It’s not a good thing, because as others have said before me, this pandemic isn’t a good thing for anything, or anyone. It’s absolute crap. At least let’s try to remain as kind as we can in the meantime.

If you think by promoting kindness, I’m romanticising being passive, you’re wrong. It’s not about loving everyone or everything. I despise, more than ever, all the factors that make some people more at risk than others. I’m not smiling politely at people who fight every day against equality, and would like to have me believe that “this is not a time for politics”. On the contrary, it sure is. We know what we risk because of the system that we have. I’m not forgetting this.

But I also want people to see the difference between someone who’s actively trying to increase inequalities, and act like a hypocrite for 2 months, and people who are just trying to survive.

Think twice, please, before you add a condescending post to your social media, or before you pick up that phone.

Please. Stay Safe.


Jugeons moins, aidons plus: Contre les dénonciations officielles ou officieuses des manquements aux règles du confinement

La priorité numéro 1 en ce moment, du point de vue de la santé, est d’aplatir la courbe d’infection du Covid-19. On l’a entendu: en restant à la maison, on sauve des vies.

C’est vrai. Si vous pouvez rester à la maison, ne commander de choses nulle part, éviter d’aller dans les magasins, ne pas sortir du tout, ne rencontrer personne, alors faites-le. Mais à l’heure où l’on a encore plus besoin de solidarité, certains utilisent cet argument pour faire ce qu’ils font de mieux: juger les autres depuis le confort de leur privilège. Ce qui a pour conséquence de renforcer les inégalités qu’ils mettent tant de coeur à nier.

C’est important de souligner la responsabilité individuelle, car c’est vrai qu’elle jour un rôle important. Tout n’est pas le résultat d’un “système” abstrait qui permettrait que personne n’ait jamais à justifier ses actions (“C’est pas de ma faute, c’est le système qui m’a obligé”). Pourtant, dans le même temps, la responsabilité individuelle ne sort pas de nulle part. Elle est façonnée par de nombreux facteurs: sociaux, économiques, politiques, familiaux…

Comme moi, vous l’avez forcément vu ou entendu: les gens appellent la police pour dénoncer leurs voisins, ces enfoirés qui sortent alors que ce n’est pas vital. Les gens postent sur les réseaux sociaux des photos de joggeurs (certaines ayant été prises il y a des mois, mais bon…). Les gens accusent les amis qui continuent de se voir alors qu’on leur a répété de ne plus le faire.

Parfois, ils utilisent l’argument de la “solidarité” précisément pour accuser ceux qui en ont le plus besoin.

Je ne vais même pas me lancer devant l’hypocrisie habituelle, aussi tragique que d’habitude. Les gens qui ne dénoncent jamais les cas qu’ils connaissent de violence domestique parce que “on ne s’immisce pas dans la vie privée” sont parmi les premiers à décrocher leur téléphone pour appeler les flics et dire qu’un dangereux groupe d’au moins trois adolescents sont en train de… discuter dans un parc! Grands dieux! Non, je n’irai même pas jusque là. Je ne parlerai pas non plus de l’hypocrisie de ceux qui applaudissent tous les soirs à 20h mais appellent les flics parce qu’une personne en bas de chez eux “est toujours dehors”… Certes, c’est une infifmière, mais attendez: elle ose sortir même quand elle ne travaille pas. Bien joué, Sherlock. Donc sortir pour aller sauver ton cul, ça va, mais sortir pour gérer tout ça, après des heures, des semaines à avoir fait face à la peur et à la mort, ça ne va plus? Non, je ne parlerai même pas de ça. Mais parlons tout de même de quelques-uns des problèmes qui sont en jeu ici.

D’abord, il semble impossible à certains d’accepter que voulant atteindre le même objectif exactement, nous puissions essayer d’y aller par des chemins complètement différents. Par exemple, j’ai fait le choix de ne rien commander par la poste, si je le pouvais, pendant toutes ces semaines. Je crois que dans mon cas, c’était le meilleur moyen de protéger les gens. D’autres ont choisi au contraire de commander de la nourriture, des livres, du matériel informatique, peu importe, soit parce qu’ils voulaient soutenir les commerces indépendants, soit parce qu’ils avaient besoin de ce matériel-là pour respecter les règles de la distanciation sociale. Personnellement, j’avais une webcam bien avant que tout ceci commence. D’autres non. Personnellement, j’ai assez de livres chez moi pour tenir deux ans. D’autres non. Je ne pense pas que ne pas commander du tout de choses non-essentielles, en ce moment, soit le seul et unique moyen de participer à l’effort collectif. C’est un peu plus compliqué que ça, quand même.

Ensuite, et cela m’énerve au plus haut point, on se comporte comme si nous étions tous dans la même situation, comme si nous avions tous les mêmes besoin… Or, c’est faux. Et je ne parle pas uniquement d’argent et d’espace ici. Une fois de plus les gens vivant avec des troubles psychologiques sont invisibilisés. Qu’on se comprenne bien: la priorité absolue en ce moment, en termes de santé publique, est d’aplatir la courbe de l’épidémie de coronavirus. Aucun système de santé, quel que soit le pays, ne peut s’en sortir autrement. Mais les gens vivent aussi avec d’autres maladies, qui ne se sont pas envolées en même temps comme par magie.

C’est peut être chiant pour vous de rester à la maison. Pour d’autres, c’est un enfer. Désolée, les deux ne sont pas comparables. Comme n’importe quelle personne qui s’intéresse aux troubles psychologiques, je suis très inquiète, depuis des semaines, de l’impact que ces mesures nécessaires que sont la distanciation sociale et le confinement vont avoir sur les gens souffrant de TOC, de dépression, de claustrophobie, etc. Je prie chaque jour que les gens ne deviennent pas plus suicidaires. Alors si quelqu’un a des pensées hyper noires et a besoin de commander un truc sur Amazon pour ne pas se mettre directement en danger, je ne le juge pas. Je jugerais plutôt les entreprises qui ont laissé travailler leurs employés pendant si longtemps sans aucune mesure de sécurité… De même, certaines personnes vivent dans des environnements éminemments toxiques. Elles sont victimes de violence domestique. Si elles ont besoin de sortir trois fois par jour pour éviter leur compagnon ou père violent, une fois de plus, je ne vois pas en quoi elles sont à blâmer. Vous pensez que la violence domestique est “évidente”? Que vous le sauriez, si quelqu’un de votre voisinage ou de votre famille étendue en était victime? Toutes les études vous donnent tort. La violence, en particulier envers les femmes et les enfants, existe de partout – et les femmes et les enfants ayant des handicaps sont particulièrement à risque. N’oublions pas l’homophobie et la transphobie, qui pour de nombreux jeunes en particulier, transforme le foyer en l’endroit le moins sûr qu’on puisse trouver. Arrêtez de penser que parce que quelqu’un “a l’air d’aller”, ça ne veut pas dire que ce quelqu’un n’est pas dans lutte quotidienne, avec lui-même ou avec d’autres.

Je ne parle pas que de danger immédiat. Nous savons que le bien-être psychologique s’inscrit dans la durée. Certaines personnes aujourd’hui sont en train d’éviter de se sentir complètement submergées, ou de connaître un burn-out, dans quelques mois. Leurs choix sont peut-être différents des vôtres, mais si c’est ce dont elles ont besoin pour prendre soin d’elles, alors qu’il en soit ainsi. Apparemment, il faut le redire: la santé n’est pas que physique. Elle est mentale, aussi.

J’ai soutenu le confinement avant qu’il ne soit mis en place au Royaume-Uni, parce que je crois que c’est la seule manière que nous avons de vaguement contrôler la situation. Mais ça ne m’a jamais donné l’arrogance de penser que tous les gens qui sortaient étaient de gros connards, comme je le vois écrit tous les jours sur les réseaux sociaux… Oui, certains sont égoistes, et se foutent de mettre en danger la vie des autres pour leur petit confort personnel. Je les déteste. Oui, je les déteste vraiment, bien que “détester” quelqu’un n’aille pas dans le sens de la bienveillance, et que je tente de défendre la bienveillance et la compréhension. Mais voilà: je suis peut-être naïve, j’ai tout de même envie de croire que la grande majorité des gens font vraiment du mieux qu’ils peuvent. Le mieux qu’ils peuvent n’est peut-être pas le mieux que vous pouvez, vous, c’est tout. On ne vit pas tous dans les mêmes conditions. On ne fait pas face aux même maux.

Je suis sortie deux fois en sept semaines. Bien sûr que ça me manque de pouvoir sortir. Mais soyons sérieux, je vais me mettre à chialer alors que je vis dans une grande maison avec un putain de jardin? Le simple fait que j’aie plusieurs pièces, et non pas une seule, et que je n’aie à partager cet espace qu’avec mon compagnon, pas d’autres membres de ma famille, est un luxe. Je peux être seule dans une pièce – et même pas une chambre – pendant plusieurs heures, tout en me confinant. Si des gens doivent parfois sortir, parce qu’ils se sentent dépassés par la présence de leurs enfants, parents ou frères et soeurs, alors je préfère qu’ils sortent raisonnablement (et ce n’est pas à moi d’en définir le seuil) plutôt qu’ils commencent à tomber en dépression ou qu’ils – ne faisons pas semblant d’ignorer que c’est aussi ça qui se passe – ne deviennent agressifs envers eux-mêmes ou leur entourage.

Ce n’est pas juste une question de vivre dans un grand appartement avec un balcon. Certaines personnes ont des problèmes psychologiques que la situation actuelle aggrave. Et même, beaucoup de gens qui ne s’étaient jamais considérés comme faisant partie des anxieux (ce qui nous rappelle que n’importe qui peut le devenir) développe des troubles comme les TOC. Et dans un sens, comment pourront-on l’éviter, au vu des circonstances actuelles? Quel est la différence entre désinfecter sa maison parce que c’est la chose à faire, et la désinfecter par compulsion ou rituel? En tant que personne vivant avec des TOC (surtout des TOC de vérification), je sais que c’est déjà difficile à percevoir hors d’un contexte de pandémie, alors maintenant…
Parallèlement, on nous bombarde de message “comment ne pas grossir pendant le confinement”. Sa mère. Bien sûr, renforcer la grossophobie, déjà que c’est une idée de merde en tous temps, quand les gens sont coincés à la maison et peut-être ainsi plus susceptibles de développer, sans même s’en rendre compte, des troubles alimentaires… Et parlons de tous les gens qui doivent en ce moment vivre un deuil. C’est horrible à n’importe quel moment… Mais ne pas même pouvoir rendre visite à une personne qu’on aime, et qui est malade… Ne pas pouvoir lui dire au revoir… Hé bien ces gens, pour ce que j’en pense, peuvent bien sortir quatre heures de suite si c’est ce dont ils ont besoin.

J’aimerais juste qu’on laisse un peu tomber le côté mon-voisin-est-un-connard, et qu’on en tente un autre: la plupart des gens font du mieux qu’ils peuvent avec ce qu’ils ont. Et oui, faisant cela, ils feront des erreurs. Certaines choses cependant ne seront pas des erreurs: ça n’est juste pas ce que vous, vous auriez fait.

La plupart des gens en ce moment, je crois, se sentent en fait perpétuellement coupables. En faisant les commissions , par exemple. On se dit que tant qu’à aller faire nos courses hebdomadaires, bi-hebdomadaires ou mensuelles, autant acheter plus d’articles, comme ça on ira moins souvent dehors. Mais on ne peut pas, parce qu’on se dit que les gens autour penseront qu’on fait des réserves… Dans les deux cas, on se sent mal. Situation perdant-perdant. Pareil pour les courses à domicile ou en drive: “Je ne vais pas aller dans le magasin, ça fera déjà une personne de moins. Oui mais du coup, une autre personne que moi, le prend, ce risque, parce qu’il faut bien m’amener mes courses?”

On a rarement autant parlé de santé publique. Certains découvrent pour la première fois pourquoi la solidarité est si essentielle à ce titre (oui, s’il vous plaît, ne votez pas à droite, ni pour un parti défendant la privatisation des hôpitaux et des soins). Je ne dirais pas “tant mieux”. Ce n’est pas une bonne chose. Comme d’autres l’ont dit avant moi, cette pandémie n’est une bonne chose pour strictement rien, ni pour personne. C’est de la vraie merde. Essayons juste de rester qussi bienveillants que possible.

Si vous croyez qu’en promouvant la bienveillance, je rends quelque peu romantique la passivité, détrompez-vous. L’idée, ça n’est pas d’aimer tout et tout le monde. Je vomis, aujourd’hui plus que jamais, tous les facteurs qui font que certaines personnes sont plus en danger que d’autres. Je ne souris pas poliment aux gens qui tous les jours combattent l’égalité, et voudraient aujourd’hui me faire croire que “ce n’est pas le moment de faire de la politique”. Au contraire, ça n’a jamais été autant le moment. On sait ce que l’on risque du fait du système que l’on a. Je ne l’oublie pas.

Mais j’aimerais aussi qu’on fasse la différence entre quelqu’un qui essaie activement de creuser les inégalités, et joue l’hypocrite pendant deux mois, et les gens qui essaient simplement de survivre.

Réfléchissez à deux fois, s’il vous plaît, avant de poster ce statut condescendant sur les réseaux sociaux, ou avant de décrocher votre téléphone.

Prenez soin de vous.

Top

0

In a time of pandemic: capitalism, decisions, and individual responsibility

IMG_20200313_111606316_HDR

french flag pastel

Firstly, I want to send my compassion to you all. Whatever your choices are, whatever decisions you make, I think it’s fair to say we all feel completely lost and overwhelmed right now.

Since the World Health Organization declared Coronavirus Covid-19 a pandemic last Wednesday, strategies have been decided and measures taken the world over. Let’s be clear: taking no measures – like they’re doing in the UK right now, pretty much – is also a chosen strategy. It sends a clear message. And it’s this message I’ve been thinking about for the past 4 days.

Why am I talking about this on a blog about OCD, depression, and grief? Well, the grief part is, sadly, obvious… I’m sorry for all the families who will have to say goodbye far too soon, without even being able to kiss and hug each other – perhaps the cruelest grieving process… About OCD and depression: I’m thinking about all the people who, like me, due to mental illness, find it extremely hard, if not downright impossible, to make decisions and not agonize over them, to decide what measures to implement in this contradictory information we are given. I’m thinking about how difficult it may be right now, especially for people living with OCD who struggle for hours daily, in the most peaceful time, with checking and anti-contamination compulsions. How difficult it might be too for hypochondriac people, and others living with a wide range of mental health issues… I’m sending solidarity, as I can’t really send much else…

 

I’m French and have been living in the UK for 10 years. These past few days, I have therefore been particularly interested in the actions taken (or indeed, not taken) both in France and the UK. I’ve seen France ignore efforts in China as well as the recommendations coming from Italian doctors and scientists, probably thinking France knew better… Recently, though, France has announced the closure of all schools, non-essential shops, restaurants, cafes, cinemas, and clubs. I believe public transport will be next. (I believe it should be.) In the UK, probably encouraged by the Brexit atmosphere, the government of Boris Johnson still acts like they don’t have to impose any measures. Europe is the epicentre of the pandemic, but they’re not part of Europe, are they? Oh, they will act. I’m sure (I hope) they will. But why take so long? Even only to show to your people that they matter?

Well, the fact that the UK doesn’t do shit (pardon my French, and let’s however thank Scotland for what they did) is the same reason France didn’t act earlier. First, they need to protect capitalism. I mean, can you imagine the devastating consequences for businesses if the whole country was to be put in lockdown? Oh yes, I have a vague idea. Like you do to. Because this is our system: every decision ever taken by our governments is first and foremost there to benefit – or at the very least not hurt – our economic system. Hence why I don’t think we can ever get a truly left-wing government in our countries: they’ll still be expected to encourage investments and production, inexpensive employment, and mass consumption… Let’s not just blame the top, shall we? It’s what we’re used to as citizens too, and many of us are not willing to lose this lifestyle: we want to be able to go to a shop almost anytime, anywhere, to buy something we want, not need. We want to have our say, and most of the time, this means we want to be customers rather than mere users (of schools, libraries, public services). We want to get our food conveniently delivered or promptly served to us in restaurants. To get that coffee from our usual Starbucks. To be able to travel miles for no other reason that we can, so why not? This is how we live. I’m not talking about people who don’t have any other choice than to rely on external help. Disabled people may need their food delivered, the shopping and cleaning done for them. I’m talking about desires, not needs. That’s what capitalism is about. To make us believe, after a while, that these desires are needs, when they’re really not.

I can’t speak of other countries, but in France and the UK, the impact of a lockdown is barely thinkable. See how horrified people are when looking at Italy’s deserted streets. See how (mostly white and wealthy) “customers” react, on a continent where they’ve been used to travel as they please, when they’re told that a border will remain shut, that a ski resort needs to be evacuated, that a plane can’t take off. See those faces as they realise it wasn’t daily-life they were experiencing. It was privilege. We only needed one crisis to be forced to realise it.

Everything is interconnected. Shut factories and ban imports, shops will soon be empty (although due to overproduction and overconsumption, I’m pretty sure we have far more than we think…). Ban public transports, people have to learn again how to live in their own space. I’m like you all. I’m not used to this. I travel a lot. Rarely do I stay more than six months in the same place. Even though I have a home – A home I love, that I share with someone I adore. But give me an opportunity, and I’ll jump at it. I’m going to stop jumping for a while, though, it seems.

 

Three days ago, I was supposed to travel to Morocco for work. I had spent months (and a lot of money) preparing for it. I had attended several medical exams due to my conditions, paid really expensive travel cover (let me tell you, diabetes + OCD + depression aren’t good for your quote). I was excited. About to meet great people and visit places I had never been to. Until Wednesday, I was so busy with the preparation bit, I hadn’t really listened to the news or gave it much thought. I knew things were pretty grim in Italy. After all, I’m on Twitter. I knew we were being told in the UK to wash our hands frequently, and I was doing it, of course. I didn’t cough, and I knew that if I did, I had to cough into my elbow. That’s all pretty standard anyway. I’ve worked in customer service, and that’s definitely what you learn there, to make sure you don’t pass anything to a colleague or customer. Use tissues once, flush them immediately, that sort of things. But on Wednesday, the WHO forced me to listen: it was a pandemic.

On Thursday morning, I woke up to a different feeling: now that everything was packed, now that I was ready to go, only now did I ask myself: should I, actually? My flight was leaving on Friday morning, and because I didn’t want to miss it and since I don’t drive, I had booked a hotel room at Gatwick Airport for the night before.

I spent my last morning home reading travel advice from official and not so official websites. Trump had just announced that all flights from Europe were banned (apart from those coming from the UK, because he was making a political point, of course he was). I had never agreed with Trump on anything, and there I was, thinking that maybe… he had a point. Not regarding the UK exception, of course, but the non-travelling part. Let’s face it: my trip was linked to a work contract, so that’s tricky, but it wasn’t essential. I looked up the website of every single airport I knew, in the UK, France, and Morocco, to see how flights were affected. Apart for flights to/from Italy, they really weren’t, it seemed to me. I spent a lot of time catching up on all the information that frankly, I had overlooked, purposefully or not. I read newspaper releases for the past two weeks, confronted different sources, from different countries, in both English and French. By 1pm, it was time to catch my coach. I left. My legs were shaking. But as someone living with OCD, I didn’t know whether I was overreacting due to my OCD or because I really should have reacted that way. I had trouble deciding what to do, but that’s just my usual behaviour. Was it because there was no clear guidance, contradictions all around us? Or because I always agonize over the most trivial decisions? Was I being ridiculous? Irrational? Was I panicking? Or was the situation indeed that serious, and my decision not to be taken lightly?

While I was on the coach my future colleagues called me. They understood my concern. So far, I had read that there had only been six cases of coronavirus declared in Morocco. Six. Here in the UK, they talked about 500, but I knew the real figure was much higher. In the thousands, probably. Someone said between 5,000 and 10,000. I had no symptoms (there wouldn’t have even been a doubt as to what to do, then), but you can carry the virus for days without knowing it… What if I crossed that border, and brought with me the worst uninvited guest? Can you honestly face being responsible for the spread of a pandemic in a country still virtually untouched?

So I read about travels. People not wanting to miss out on their holidays. I read how Europeans refused to acknowledge what it meant, to live in the pandemic epicentre, when we’d always been so quick to blame it on other countries … I read about how due to Ebola, people from Africa were not welcome at all in Europe, and yet, with our live documented coronavirus outbreak, we were still visiting Cuba, Tunisia, Argentina, unchallenged. I read how in Africa especially, the vast majority of the first covid-19 cases had been introduced by tourists… Not people visiting their families, attending a wedding or a funeral. Tourists. Could there be a more accurate synonym for “non-essential travel”? Some were apparently taking advantage of the low prices on cruises, flights, circuits. It couldn’t have been clearer. The only reason why we didn’t shut borders (and god knows I believe in no-border spaces) and cancel all flights was our submission to capitalism, not that the situation wasn’t all that bad. Capitalism as we now it is built on colonialism. This idea that we, white Europeans, own the world – the sky, even. That it’s our most basic human right to “move freely”. Who moves freely? I was able to go to Morocco just like that, with a valid passport, and stay up to three months, no questions asked. Moroccan people have to ask for expensive and limited visas even just for a few days in Paris… I had spent the last year in the footsteps of Montaigne, reflecting on the relationship between travel, in particular travel writing, and privilege. Was I to forget all I had written, all I believed in too, just because I really wanted to go on that work trip? I didn’t want to let my employers down. Losing that amount of money felt scary too. Capitalistic factors. How can these ever compare to risking people’s lives?

As someone who finds it hard to make decisions, it may disgust the most leftist of you, but I find it easier to know what to do when there is official guidance to rely on. I was hoping for one to be released, one which would say: from today onwards, no one can fly in or out of the UK unless their trip is essential. Sadly for me, this statement didn’t come… The British page for Foreign Travel Advice stated very clearly, on the contrary, that you would not be eligible for any compensation, were you to cancel a trip to a country not listed on their website. So here it was: up to you. The beauty of the free market. Of individualism. Let our will and financial motivations be our only guides.

I asked friends, family. They all told me that by that time, to them it was obvious: I had already made my mind. I couldn’t see it yet. I cried. I cried over not being able to choose. Poor individualistic white girl. Not being able to accept what it meant, to live where we put business and profit first. Overwhelmed by the fear of never being hired by this organization again… Take more Diazepam and shut up already.

That night, the French government announced it will close schools. I knew how reluctant they had been. I couldn’t sleep.

In the morning I knew what I’d do. I went to the breakfast restaurant with my mobile phone to type that email I was dreading. All around me, people were reading on their phones and tablets the latest news on coronavirus. They discussed it nervously over tea. They all seemed annoyed that perhaps they wouldn’t be able to enter their destination country. I didn’t hear anyone say: “Okay, you know what? Let’s cancel. Let’s go home.” Oh, I know. They had worked so hard. Saved for months. You hear that about the climate emergency too. “Why should I not travel if everybody else does? What is it going to change, just one more person, huh?”

And indeed people brushed doubts off: since it’s a pandemic, everyone, every country will get it eventually. So we might as well enjoy.

I sent that email.

I didn’t go.

Went back to my room, because checkout was at 12, and when the flight took off to Casablanca, I was fast asleep in my London bed.

I took the train home. Posted an update on social media, so my readers and followers knew there wouldn’t be any Moroccan travel updates this time around.

That’s when Moroccan authorities decided to stop all travellers from France from entering their country anyway. I had hoped this would happen. But as a French national living in and coming from the UK, they would have let me in. Rather than share the responsibility with the country I live in (I might be furious at their inaction, I also know it’d be an easy excuse, a way to make myself unaccountable) I knew what I’d have thought: you’re the only person responsible now. If something happens to any person you interact with, it’s all on you. Live with that.

And still, wasn’t it too late? If I was indeed carrying the virus, I could have contaminated the coach driver, the hotel staff, my fellow train passengers… Or I could have caught it and bring it home.

 

Last night, as I said earlier, the French government finally announced the closure of all “non-essential” shops, restaurants, cafes, cinemas and clubs. Today, my mom worked in one of the “essential shops”. A supermarket. They were given masks and gloves. Still. We’re all scared for her.

Like us all, I would have preferred not to experience it, but I also believe that this terrible health crisis will generate new forms of solidarity. More global forms of solidarity. I see people standing with workers who aren’t yet safe. I see people make beautiful gestures: helping someone with shopping, giving out books and films, offering to listen to those who need it, asking their governments to consider people we don’t think of, homeless people, prisoners. I see people explain that if you’re willing to flee to Africa at the very first risk for your life, or the life of your loved ones, you can never again deny entry to – or simply ignore – the thousands of refugees who only claim the right to live safely.

Sadly, though, these times also bring another excuse to blame everyone who doesn’t do exactly as you do, people who haven’t yet understood how dangerous their actions were… We put it down to individual responsibility (and stupidity): people who panic-buy are shamed on social media, along with pictures of their overfilled supermarket trolleys. People are called irresponsible for going out, spending one more night in restaurants “before the apocalypse”, as they say… Sure, I’d rather they hadn’t been out and had stayed indoors. While we can’t excuse such behaviour, we can probably understand it, however. “Look, why is it that not all countries do the same, if that’s really necessary?” Firstly, we have to demand that countries like the UK stop ignoring what they’re being told, the same way Italy kept asking for immediate measures in France. Secondly, many people haven’t yet got how unique the whole situation was, how different from any other threat. To them, drastic measures are only associated with countries at war or totalitarian States. (See Giorgio Agamben’s text, which had been much – and rightly – criticized since.) We can assume that if strict confining is indeed decided, the army and the police will likely get involved, with reinforced video surveillance systems too… Can we afford to not even consider for one minute how this power could be abused? It certainly doesn’t mean, “You’re right, go drink that pint in the pub while you should be at home” (many of the people still enjoying night life absolutely don’t care about fighting for people’s rights anyway, so they shouldn’t pretend they do now), and we need to act urgently, ask people to get the fuck home, as the internet has it, but let’s keep this discussion happening, too. Let’s find new ways to protest and ensure people are heard.

In addition, over the years, I’ve spoken to so many people who are convinced that their government will do nothing, absolutely nothing, was there to be a food shortage. Even in such a capitalist country as the UK, I want to believe that if it were to happen, a system would be put in place so that food is made available to everyone, especially the most vulnerable. Yet given what is being done by the State for homeless and poor people, I agree one can doubt such timely generosity… Hence the bulk buying.

Given how violently we have been silencing and ridiculing scientists for decades on topics as crucial as the climate emergency, it’s a bit difficult to ask everyone to listen to their expertise at once. Given what we’ve always been told about dictatorial States, what we’ve always considered our very specific (and superior) sense of freedom, acting as we please regardless of consequences in the name of Capitalism, people are not willing to let that go. You can’t teach someone for decades that all that matters is their own individual choices, and then suddenly expect them to think “community” first. Come on, in France, the only time we ever mention community is to criticize people who don’t “integrate” the way we’d like them to… Honestly? “Community” in France is almost a slur.

 

So what can we do? I am no scientist, so I’ll follow what doctors and experts keep saying: I’ll stay home as much as I can. When I’ll go out, I’ll do all I can too to avoid being a danger to others. But I hope we can drop the blaming game, study the politics of such individual choices to understand what they are and how to change them as quickly as we can. Let’s keep sharing those stats and important articles, let’s try to educate ourselves about what we should do. People who make individualistic choices may be morally wrong, they’re not irrational: they’re acting as they’ve only been taught to act. Also, I know it’s hard to accept, but people have different fears. Yes, I don’t like seeing a supermarket trolley full of toilet paper these days… But who am I to know that the customer doesn’t have mental health issues? I have mental health issues myself, OCD in particular being considered a disability because there are actions I can’t do, decisions I can’t make. It can take me a lot more time to understand something that will appear “obvious” to anyone else (as may have been clear from this very blog…). I sometimes make very poor choices because of my OCD and depressive episodes. I can panic very quickly over… well, anything, frankly. I have been “stuck” in a shop and needed external help to come get me out of there (thank you Quentin, I’m sorry for the unexciting life I’m offering you!)… Perhaps some of these people (I’m not naive, I said “some”) literally panicked while in the shop, even though they came for their normal shopping trip… Perhaps some of them thought strategically: “I’m in a high-risk group, so I’d rather keep my shop visits to a minimum. If I buy all these, perhaps I can avoid coming back for another month.” They don’t need all that toilet paper for a month, you say? That’s true. Perhaps they’re going to give it to their family, neighbours, I don’t know! I only hope they’re doing their best. And maybe they are just selfish. Maybe the fear of being called out publicly helps to not normalise such behaviour. Though I’ve never personally seen anyone go from being a selfish asshole to a generous soul because they saw their stupid face on the internet. I think they get frustrated and aggressive then, that’s all.

 

People have just as much contradictions as they’re being fed. Today in France, elections took place despite doctors advising strongly and explicitly against them. Public transport were running, many supermarkets open, markets crowded. People working for cleaning companies kept cleaning the spaces we take for granted. You want people to voluntarily self-isolate, when the government sends such contradictory messages? Yes, people should take their responsibilities. But one of our responsibilities, surely, is to stand together as much as we can. Please don’t call “anti-democratic” people who didn’t go out to vote today. Don’t tell them if the far right ever wins, it’ll be because of people like them. Don’t patronize them by saying they’re playing by the fascists’ rules. Equally, please don’t accuse people who did go out to vote they have killed your grandmother, when all they’ve heard since childhood is that not going out to vote is the most irresponsible act, the worst thing any citizen can do. Try your best, with what you’ve got, as my friend Pauline always says. Listen to medical recommendations. Accept that you may support things you never agreed with before, because never before have you experienced these serious worldwide circumstances. I mean, I never thought that once in my life I would be encouraging borders… And there I am, hoping countries do all they can to protect themselves and the countries around us… There I am, having always defended the right to meet and protest in the streets, now praying for people to find other ways to voice their demands…

I don’t know. At the end of the day, I still feel lost and overwhelmed.


Au temps de la pandémie: capitalisme, décisions et responsabilité individuelle

Tout d’abord, je veux vous envoyer toute ma compassion. Quels que soient les choix que vous fassiez, les décisions que vous preniez, je pense que là où on tombera tou·tes d’accord, c’est qu’on se sent complètement perdu·es et dépassé·es.

Depuis que l’Organisation mondiale de la santé a reconnu le Coronavirus Covid-19 comme étant une pandémie mercredi dernier, tout autour du monde des stratégies ont été dessinées, des mesures prises. Soyons clair·es : ne pas prendre de mesures (un peu ce que fait le Royaume-Uni en ce moment, en fait), c’est aussi choisir une stratégie. Le message que cela envoie est clair. Et c’est à ce message que je pense depuis 4 jours.

Pourquoi est-ce que je parle de ça sur un blog qui concerne les TOC, la dépression, le deuil ? Malheureusement pour le deuil, je pense que c’est évident. Je suis désolée pour toutes les familles qui auront à se dire au revoir bien trop tôt, sans pouvoir même, comble peut-être de cette douleur, se prendre dans les bras et s’embrasser… Concernant les TOC et la dépression : je pense à toutes les personnes qui, comme moi, en raison d’un trouble mental, trouvent extrêmement difficile, sinon purement impossible, de prendre des décisions sans se torturer, de faire le tri dans ce qu’on nous dit. Je pense à combien la situation doit être difficile, en ce moment, particulièrement pour les gens touchés par les TOC de vérification et d’hygiène. Combien il doit être difficile d’être hypocondriaque à l’heure qu’il est, ou d’avoir un autre problème de cet ordre. Je vous envoie ma solidarité, puisque je ne peux pas envoyer grand-chose d’autre…

 

Je suis française et vis au Royaume-Uni depuis 10 ans. Ces derniers jours, j’ai donc été particulièrement intéressée par les actions prises (ou non prises, justement) par la France et le Royaume-Uni. J’ai vu la France ignorer les efforts faits en Chine et les recommandations de doctoresses·eurs et scientifiques italien·nes, pensant qu’on était tellement plus malins qu’elles·ux… Maintenant, la France a annoncé la fermeture de toutes les écoles, commerces non-essentiels, restaurants, cafés, cinémas, et discothèques. Je pense que les transports en commun sont les prochains sur la liste. (J’espère qu’ils le sont.) Au Royaume-Uni, sûrement encouragé par l’atmosphère du Brexit, le gouvernement de Boris Johnson persiste à agir comme s’il n’avait aucune mesure à prendre. L’Europe est certes le centre de l’épidémie, mais le Royaume-Uni ne fait pas partie de l’Europe, voyons, n’est-il pas ? Oh, ils finiront par agir. Je suis sûre (j’espère) qu’ils le feront. Mais pourquoi prendre si longtemps ? Même simplement pour montrer que la population est importante à leurs yeux?

La raison pour laquelle le Royaume-Uni ne fait rien (saluons tout de même l’Écosse pour ce qu’elle a fait) est la même raison pour laquelle la France n’a pas agi plus tôt. Ces pays protègent d’abord le capitalisme. Vous imaginez les circonstances dramatiques pour les entreprises si le pays entier était mis en confinement ? Oui, je peux vaguement imaginer, en fait. Vous aussi. Parce que c’est notre système ; chaque décision prise par notre gouvernement ne l’est jamais que pour servir, avant tout (ou en tout cas ne pas déstabiliser) notre système économique. C’est pour ça que je pense qu’on ne pourra jamais avoir de gouvernement véritablement de gauche à la tête de nos pays : on lui demandera d’abord, malgré tout, d’encourager les investissements et la production, les emplois peu chers et la consommation de masse… Mais ne faisons pas que pointer le haut de la pyramide. C’est à cela aussi que nous somme habitué·es en tant que citoyen·nes, et beaucoup d’entre nous ne sont pas prêt·es à changer ce style de vie : nous voulons pouvoir aller dans un magasin quasiment quand on le souhaite, où qu’on soit, pour acheter quelque chose qu’on désire, mais dont nous n’avons aucun besoin. Nous voulons pouvoir noter les prestations et, la plupart du temps (c’est surtout vrai au Royaume-Uni), cela fait de nous des consommatrices·eurs plutôt que des usager·es (par rapport aux écoles, aux bibliothèques, aux services publics). Nous voulons qu’on nous livre en toute praticité notre nourriture, ou qu’on nous la serve dans des restaurants. Nous voulons prendre ce café à notre Starbucks habituel. Nous voulons pouvoir parcourir des kilomètres pour la seule raison qu’on le peut, alors pourquoi pas? Voilà comment on vit. Je ne parle pas des gens qui n’ont pas d’autres choix que de compter sur une aide extérieure. Les personnes handicapées peuvent avoir besoin qu’on leur livre leur nourriture, leurs courses, et qu’on fasse le ménage pour elles. Je parle des désirs, non des besoins. C’est cela, le capitalisme. Nous faire croire, à force d’habitude, que ces désirs sont des besoins, alors qu’ils ne le sont absolument pas.

Je ne peux pas parler des autres pays, mais en France et au Royaume-Uni, l’impact d’un lockdown est à peine imaginable. Regardez à quel point les gens sont horrifiés de voir les rues désertes de l’Italie. Voyez comment les client·es (souvent blanc·hes et aisé·es) réagissent, sur un continent où ils et elles ont pris l’habitude de voyager comme bon leur semblait, quand on leur dit qu’une frontière leur restera fermée, ou que leur station de ski doit être évacuée. Regardez ces visages quand ils et elles prennent conscience que ça n’était pas simplement la vie quotidienne, ça, mais l’expression d’un privilège. Une crise sanitaire. C’est tout ce qu’il aura fallu pour qu’on soit bien obligé·es de s’en rendre compte.

Tout est lié. Fermez les usines et interdisez les imports, et les magasins seront bientôt vides (encore que vu notre surproduction et notre surconsommation, je suis sûre qu’on en aurait pour plus longtemps qu’on ne le pense…). Interdisez les transports en commun, et les gens doivent réapprendre à vivre leur espace. Je suis comme vous tou·tes. Je n’ai pas l’habitude de ça non plus. Je me déplace beaucoup. Reste rarement plus de six mois au même endroit. Bien que j’aie un chez moi (un chez moi que j’aime, avec une personne que j’adore), donnez-moi une seule opportunité et je sauterais dessus. On dirait quand même que là, je risque de moins sauter pendant quelques temps.

 

Il y a trois jours, je devais partir au Maroc pour le travail. J’avais passé des mois (et beaucoup d’argent) à préparer ce voyage. J’avais eu plusieurs visites médicales en raison de mon profil, et payé une assurance voyage ultra chère (laissez-moi vous dire que la combinaison diabète + TOC + dépression, les assurances n’aiment pas beaucoup). J’avais hâte. J’étais sur le point de rencontrer des gens géniaux et de visiter des lieux que je n’avais jamais vus. Jusqu’à mercredi, j’étais si débordée par les préparatifs que je n’avais pas encore bien écouté les informations, ou je n’avais pas pris le temps de les écouter correctement. Je savais que ça n’allait pas fort en Italie. J’utilise Twitter, quand même. Je savais qu’on nous disait au Royaume-Uni de bien nous laver les mains régulièrement, et je le faisais, bien sûr. Je ne toussais pas, mais je savais que si je toussais, je devais le faire dans mon coude. Des procédures assez standards, somme toute. Ayant travaillé dans le commerce et en bibliothèque, c’est quelque chose qu’on nous apprend, afin de ne surtout pas passer ça aux collègues, client·es ou usager.es. N’utilisez de mouchoirs qu’une fois, mettez-les dans les toilettes et tirez la chasse, ce genre de trucs. Mais mercredi, l’OMS m’a obligée à écouter : c’était bien une pandémie.

Jeudi matin, je me suis réveillée dans un autre état d’esprit : maintenant que mon sac était prêt, que j’étais moi-même prête à partir, maintenant seulement me venait cette question : est-ce que je dois vraiment y aller ? Mon avion partait vendredi matin, et parce que je ne voulais pas le rater et que je ne conduis pas, j’avais réservé une chambre la veille dans un hôtel de l’aéroport de Londres Gatwick.

J’ai passé ma dernière matinée à la maison à lire des recommandations de voyage sur les sites officiels et pas si officiels que ça. Trump venait d’annoncer que tous les vols en provenance de l’Europe étaient interdits (excepté ceux du Royaume-Uni, parce que c’était évidemment un message politique). Je n’avais jamais partagé une seule opinion avec Trump, et voilà que je me disais que c’était peut-être pas si bête… Pas concernant le Royaume-Uni, évidemment, mais plutôt concernant ces voyages qu’on pouvait éviter. Mon voyage était lié à un contrat de travail, donc en effet c’était un peu plus compliqué qu’un voyage d’agrément, mais il n’était pas vital ou indispensable. J’ai regardé les sites de tous les aéroports que je connaissais, au Royaume-Uni, en France et au Maroc, pour voir l’influence que cela avait sur les vols actuels. Mis à part les vols en provenance de et à destination de l’Italie, ils n’étaient en fait vraiment pas affectés. J’ai passé beaucoup de temps à rattraper les nouvelles que franchement, j’avais négligé, consciemment ou non. J’ai lu les revues de presse des deux dernières semaines, confronté des sources venant de pays différents, en anglais comme en français. À 13h, je devais partir pour avoir mon car. Je suis partie. Mes jambs tremblaient. Mais ayant des TOC, je ne savais pas si j’avais une réaction exagérée en raison de mes TOC, ou si c’était la réaction à avoir. Je n’arrivais pas à décider quoi faire, mais c’est un peu mon comportement habituel, pour être honnête. Était-ce parce qu’il n’y avait aucune directives claires, et des contradictions partout autour de nous ? Ou parce que je me torture quant à la plus banale des décisions ? Est-ce que j’étais juste ridicule ? Irrationnelle ? Est-ce que j’étais en train de paniquer? Ou la situation était-elle aussi grave qu’elle en avait l’air, et ma décision à ne surtout pas prendre à la légère?

Alors que j’étais dans le car, mes futurs collègues m’ont appelée. Ils ont compris mes craintes. Jusqu’ici, il n’y avait eu que six cas de coronavirus déclarés au Maroc. Six. Ici, au Royaume-Uni, ils parlaient de 500 cas, mais je savais qu’il y en avait bien plus. Quelqu’un avait parlé d’un chiffre compris entre 5 000 et 10 000. Je n’avais aucun symptôme (car dans ce cas-là, il n’y aurait eu aucun doute quant à ce qu’il fallait faire), mais on peut être vectrice du virus pendant plusieurs jours sans le savoir… Si je franchissais cette frontière, et que j’amenais avec moi le pire invité surprise ? Pouvez-vous honnêtement supporter d’être responsable de la propagation d’une pandémie au sein d’un pays encore presque intouché ?

J’ai donc lu des choses à propos de voyages. Des gens qui ne voulaient pas rater leurs vacances. J’ai lu comment les Europén·nes refusait d’admettre ce que ça signifiait, de vivre à l’épicentre de l’épidémie, alors qu’on avait toujours été si prompt·es à condamner les autres pays… J’ai lu comment en raison d’Ebola, les gens venant d’Afrique n’étaient plus les bienvenu·es en Europe, et comment nous, avec nos foyers épidémiques fort documentés, on continuait de visiter Cuba, la Tunisie, l’Argentine, sans se poser aucune question. J’ai lu qu’en Afrique, en particulier, la grande majorité des cas de covid-19 avaient été introduits par des touristes… Pas par des gens rendant visite à leur famille, venant pour un mariage ou des funérailles, non. Des touristes. Y a-t-il jamais eu de meilleur synonyme pour « voyage non indispensable » ? Certain·es en profitaient apparemment pour bénéficier de prix défiant toute concurrence sur les croisières, les vols, les circuits. Ça n’aurait pas pu être plus clair : la seule raison pour laquelle on ne fermait pas les frontières (et dieu sait que je crois en un monde sans frontière) ni n’annulions tous les vols, c’était notre soumission au capitalisme. Le capitalisme, tel que nous le connaissons, s’est construit sur le système colonial. Cette idée que le monde, le ciel même, nous appartient à nous, Europen·nes blanc·hes. Que c’est notre droit le plus essentiel que de « circuler librement ». Mais qui circule librement ? Je pouvais aller au Maroc juste comme ça, avec un passeport en cours de validité, et y rester trois mois si je voulais, pas de questions merci. Les ressortissants marocain·es doivent obtenir des visas chers et fort limités pour simplement quelques jours à Paris… J’avais passé l’année précédente dans les pas de Montaigne, à écrire sur le lien entre voyage (et en particulier écrit de voyage) et privilège. Est-ce que je devais ignorer tout ce que j’avais écrit, tout ce en quoi je croyais, aussi, sous le simple prétexte que j’avais vraiment envie de faire ce voyage-ci ? Je ne voulais pas faire faux bond à mes employeurs. Perdre cette somme d’argent que j’avais engagée me faisait peur, aussi. Des facteurs financiers. Comment peut-on comparer ça à des vies humaines ?

En tant que personne qui prend très difficilement des décisions, ça va dégoûter les plus gauchos d’entre vous, mais c’est plus facile pour moi quand il y a une directive claire sur laquelle je peux m’appuyer… J’espèrais qu’on en publie une, qui dirait qu’à compter de ce jour, personne ne pourrait plus quitter le Royaume-Uni ou y pénétrer par avion, sauf dans les cas de déplacements essentiels. Malheureusement pour moi, cette directive n’arriva pas. La page gouvernementale concernant les voyages à l’étranger précisait même clairement qu’on n’aurait droit à aucun remboursement si on annulait son voyage pour une destination qui n’était pas listée sur le site. Alors voilà : c’était à nous de voir. La beauté du capitalisme et de son libre marché. La beauté de l’individualisme. Laissons nos volontés et nos intérêts financiers être nos seuls guides.

J’ai demandé leur avis à des ami·es, à ma famille. Ils et elles m’ont tou·tes dit que pour eux·lles, c’était évident : à cette heure-là, j’avais déjà pris ma décision. Mais moi, je ne le voyais pas. J’ai pleuré. Pleuré parce que je n’arrivais pas à decider. Pauvre petite blanche individuelle. Qui a peur de ne plus jamais être embauchée par cette structure. Prends pluis de Diazepam et ferme ta gueule.

Cette nuit-là, le gouvernement français a annoncé qu’il fermerait les écoles. Je savais à quel point cette décision les avait fait hésiter. Je n’ai pas dormi.

Au matin, je savais quoi faire. Je me suis rendue à la salle du petit-déjeuner avec mon téléphone pour écrire cet email que je redoutais. Tout autour de moi, les gens lisaient sur leur téléphone, leur tablette, les dernières nouvelles concernant le coronavirus. Ils en parlaient nerveusement devant leur tasse de thé. Ils avaient l’air embêtés, peut-être ne les laisserait-on pas entrer dans leur pays de destination. Mais je n’ai entendu personne dire : « Okay, tu sais quoi, viens on annule tout. Rentrons à la maison. » Oh, je comprends. Ils avaient travaillé dur. Économisé pendant des mois. On entend ça à propos de l’urgence climatique, également. “Pourquoi est-ce que moi je ne devrais pas voyager alors que tout le monde le fait? Qu’est-ce que ça change, une personne, hein ? »

Et les gens repoussaient ainsi leurs doutes : comme il s’agissait d’une pandémie, tout le monde, tous les pays du monde, finiraient par être touchés. Alors tant qu’à faire, autant profiter.

J’ai envoyé mon email.

Je ne suis pas partie.

Je suis retournée dans ma chambre, j’avais jusqu’à midi pour la libérer, et à l’heure où décollait l’avion pour Casablanca, je dormais à poings fermés.

J’ai pris le train pour rentrer à la maison. Posté la nouvelle sur les réseaux sociaux, pour que mes lecteurs·rices et followeurs·euses sachent qu’il n’y aurait pas cette fois de journal de voyage marocain.

C’est à cette heure-là que les autorités marocaines ont décidé d’arrêter tous les voyageurs en provenance de France, de toute façon. J’avais espéré que ça arriverait. Mais en tant que citoyenne française habitant au et partant du Royaume-Uni, on m’aurait laissée rentrer. Plutôt que de partager cette responsabilité avec le pays d’où je venais (j’ai beau être furieuse vis-à-vis de son inaction, je sais aussi que c’est une manière facile de se dédouaner, c’est le cas de le dire, tiens) je sais ce que j’aurais pensé : voilà, c’est toi la seule responsable, maintenant. Si quelque chose arrive à n’importe laquelle des personnes que tu rencontreras, ça seras de ta faute. Allez, vis avec ça.

Et de toute façon, n’était-ce pas trop tard ? Si j’étais porteuse du virus, j’avais pu contaminer le chauffeur de bus, les employé·es de l’hôtel, les passagers de mon wagon… J’aurais aussi pu l’attraper et le ramener à la maison.

 

Hier soir, comme je l’écrivais plus haut, le gouvernement français a finalement annoncé la fermeture de tous les commerces « non-essentiels », des restaurants, des cafés, des cinémas et des discothèques. Aujourd’hui, ma mère travaillait dans un supermarché. On leur a donné des masques et des gants. J’ai peur pour elle malgré tout.

Comme nous tou·tes, j’auaris préféré ne pas vivre ça, mais je crois aussi que cette terrible crise sanitaire générera de nouvelles formes de solidarité, une solidarité plus globale. Je vois les gens soutenir les travailleur·ses encore non protégé·es. Je les vois faire des gestes : aider quelqu’un avec ses courses, offrir des livres ou des films, demander au gouvernement de penser à celles et ceux à qui on ne pense jamais : les sans-domiciles, les détenu·es. Je vois les gens expliquer que si tu es prêt·e à courir te réfugier en Afrique au premier risque pour ta vie, tu n’as plus le droit de refuser ni même de simplement ignorer les milliers de réfugié·es qui ne demandent que le droit à vivre en sécurité.

Malheureusement, les circonstances offrent aussi une occasion de plus d’insulter tous les gens qui ne font pas exactement comme nous, qui n’ont pas tout de suite compris le danger de leurs actions… Nous mettons tout sur le dos de la responsabilité (ou stupidité) individuelle : les gens qui achètent des quantités énormes sous une certaine panique sont montrés sur les réseaux sociaux, avec la photo de leurs chariots trop remplis. Les gens sont qualifiés d’irresponsables quand ils sortent une dernière nuit au restaurant, « avant l’apocalypse » comme ils disent… Bien sûr, j’aurais préféré qu’ils ne le fassent pas et restent chez eux. Pourtant sans l’excuser, on peut probablement comprendre pourquoi ils le font. « Attendez, pourquoi tous les pays ne font pas la même chose, si c’est si grave que ça et que c’est la seule chose à faire ? » D’une part, exigeons des pays comme le Royaume-Uni d’arrêter d’ignorer la gravité des faits, comme l’Italie l’a répété à la France ces derniers jours. D’autre part, tellement de gens n’ont pas compris le caractère absolument unique de ce qui se passe actuellement. Pour eux, les mesures de confinement drastiques sont le propre des pays en guerre, des états dictatoriaux (lisez à ce sujet le texte de Giorgio Agamben, très justement critiqué depuis). On peut supposer que si le confinement strict doit en effet être mis en place, l’armée et la police seront certainement réquisitionnées, avec des systèmes de vidéosurveillance renforcés… Peut-on vraiment se permettre de ne pas se poser cinq minutes la question de possibles dérives ? Cela ne veut certainement pas dire : « T’as raison, va boire ta bière au bar alors que tu devrais rester chez toi » (beaucoup se fichent complètement d’habitude de la défense de leurs droits, alors qu’ils ne viennent pas faire semblant maintenant). Nous devons agir très vite, demander aux gens de stay the fuck home, comme le dit si bien internet, mais laissons aussi cette conversation avoir lieu. Trouvons d’autres moyens de manifester et de faire en sorte que les gens soient écoutés.

De plus, au fil des ans, j’ai parlé à beaucoup de gens qui sont persuadés que leur gouvernement ne ferait rien, absolument rien, en cas de pénurie de nourriture. Même dans un pays aussi capitaliste que le Royaume-Uni, j’ai envie de croire que si cela arrivait, un système serait mis en place pour que de la nourriture soit mise à disposition de tou·tes, en particulier les plus vulnérables. Mais vu ce que fait l’Etat concernant les sans-domiciles et les pauvres, je conviens aisément qu’on puisse douter d’une telle générosité… D’où les rayons dévalisés.

Étant donné à quel point on fait taire et on décrédibilise depuis des décennies les scientifiques pour des sujets aussi graves que l’urgence climatique, difficile aujourd’hui d’imposer aux gens de s’en remettre illico à leur expertise. Étant donné tout ce qu’on nous a toujours dit des États dictatoriaux, ce qu’on a toujours considéré comme notre sens très spécifique (et supérieur) de la liberté, nous permettant de faire ce qui nous chante sans jamais nous soucier des conséquences au nom de notre dieu capitalisme, les gens ne sont pas prêts à lâcher si vite. On ne peut pas apprendre aux gens pendant des décennies que tout ce qui compte, ce sont leurs choix individuels, et tout à coup attendre d’eux qu’ils pensent d’abord en terme de « communauté ». En France, les seules fois où on emploie même ce mot, c’est pour critiquer les personnes qui ne « s’intègrent » pas comme on voudrait qu’elles le fassent. Honnêtement ? « Communauté », en France, c’est quasiment une insulte.

 

Alors, que peut-on faire ? Je ne suis pas scientifique, alors je suivrai ce que médecins et expert·es ne cessent de répéter : je resterai à la maison autant que je le pourrai. Quand je sortirai, je ferai tout ce que je peux pour ne pas représenter un danger pour les autres. J’espère aussi qu’on peut arrêter le jeu des accusations, politiser ces choix individuels pour en comprendre la portée mais aussi savoir comment les modifier aussi vite que possible. Continuons de partager les statistiques qui circulent et les articles importants, continuons de nos éduquer sur ce que l’on doit faire. Les gens qui font des choix individualistes font peut-être des choix immoraux, mais pas irrationnels : ils agissent comme on le leur a toujours appris. Parallèlement, et c’est dur à accepter, les gens n’ont pas tous les mêmes peurs. Certes, je n’aime pas voir les caddies de supermarché du moment, débordant de papier toilette… Mais qui suis-je pour dire que ces gens-là n’ont pas aussi des troubles psychologiques ? Je suis moi-même atteinte de ces troubles, les TOC en particulier étant considérés comme un handicap car il y a des choses que je ne peux pas faire, des décisions que je ne peux pas prendre. Ça peut me prendre plus longtemps de comprendre quelque chose qui paraîtra à tout le monde « évident ». Je fais parfois de très mauvais choix en raison de mes TOC et de mes épisodes de dépression. Je peux paniquer très vite face à… n’importe quoi, en fait. On a déjà dû venir me chercher dans un grand magasin (merci Quentin, pardon encore pour ces rebondissements que je t’inflige dans ma vie trépidante !) car j’étais « coincée »… Peut-être que certains de ces gens (je ne suis pas naïve, je n’ai pas dit tous…) ont littéralement paniqué une fois dans le magasin, alors qu’ils venaient pour leurs courses habituelles. Peut-être aussi que certains pensent stratégiquement : « J’appartiens à une population à risque, donc je dois faire en sorte de ne pas venir ici trop souvent. Si j’achète tout ça, peut-être puis-je éviter de revenir pendant tout un mois. » Ils n’ont pas besoin de tout ce papier toilette pour un mois, dites-vous ? En effet. Peut-être qu’ils en donneront à leur famille, leurs voisin·es, je ne sais pas ! J’espère qu’ils font de leur mieux. Et peut-être qu’ils sont juste égoïstes. Et peut-être en effet que la peur de se faire défoncer en public permet de ne pas normaliser ce type de comportement. Mais pour tout vous dire, je n’ai jamais vu un ignoble connard nombriliste devenir une âme des plus généreuses simplement parce qu’il avait vu sa sale face sur internet. Je pense que ça les rend frustrés et agressifs, pas grand-chose d’autre.

 

Les gens révèlent autant de contradictions qu’on leur en a donné pour se construire. Aujourd’hui, en France, des élections ont eu lieu contre l’avis des médecins. Les transports en commun fonctionnaient, beaucoup de supermarchés étaient ouverts, les marchés étaient pleins. Les personnes travaillant pour des sociétés d’entretien ont continué à nettoyer les espaces que l’on prend pour acquis. On veut que la population s’auto-confine, alors que le gouvernement envoie de telles informations contradictoires ? Oui, chacun·e doit prendre ses responsabilités. Mais l’une de nos responsabilités, c’est sûrement de rester solidaires autant que possible. S’il vous plaît, n’appelez pas « anti-démocratiques » les personnes qui ne sont pas allées voter aujourd’hui. Ne leur dites pas que si l’extrême-droite passe un jour, ça sera à cause de gens comme eux. Arrêtez votre condescendance, quand vous dites qu’ils jouent le jeu des fascistes. De la même façon, n’accusez pas les personnes qui sont allées voter d’avoir tué votre grand-mère, alors qu’on leur répète depuis l’enfance que c’est ne pas voter qui est un geste irresponsable, la pire chose qu’un·e citoyen·e puisse faire. Faites de votre mieux avec ce que vous avez, comme dit toujours mon amie Pauline. Écoutez les recommandations médicales. Acceptez que vous défendrez peut-être des choses avec lesquelles vous n’aviez jusqu’à présent jamais été d’accord, puisque vous n’avez jamais eu à les considérer à la lumières de circonstances internationales si difficiles. Franchement, je n’aurais jamais pensé qu’un jour je défendrai les frontières… Et voici que j’espère que les différents pays feront tout ce qu’ils pourront afin de se protéger eux-mêmes, et de protéger les pays qui les entourent… Voici qu’ayant toujours défendu le nécessité de se rassembler et de manifester dans les rues, je prie que les gens trouvent un autre moyen, là tout de suite, d’exprimer leur revendications…

Je ne sais pas. Au fond, je reste perdue. Dépassé.é.

Top

2

When the day bleeds

french flag pastel

Got home safe at last after a 13-hour delay due to storm Ciara. Was feeling relieved, if a little tired, and ready to get back to work. I just thought I’d watch a couple music videos while drinking a cup of tea first. Played “Someone you loved” by Lewis Capaldi, didn’t know what it was really about but my mom loves this song. I got from the words that it was a sad one, obviously, but still I didn’t expect anything like this… Or perhaps it’s my reaction to it I didn’t expect.

This video broke me. I mean I’m fine, I absolutely am because that’s just life, we’ll all have to experience grief one day, there’s nothing more common or banal, infuriatingly. The ordinary, too, can overflow its banks. But it’s funny how much you think that it’s all fine now, that the “keeping going” part is not as excruciating as it used to be, when suddenly you feel this acute pain – a pain no time or love can heal. This all too banal pain of knowing you’ll never see that one person smile again.

If a Ryanair plane can take off and land safely in a storm, surely, I should be able to go back to work after crying watching a 4-minute video, shouldn’t I? I should be. I will. I’m just a different kind of machine. Who needs to stop pressing the wrong buttons. Or perhaps to accept that I’m pressing them unconsciously, when somehow I know I need to. Grieving doesn’t have to fit into our neat, busy schedule. Sometimes, it may be okay to let it bleed into our day.

“For now the day bleeds
Into nightfall
And you’re not here
To get me through it all.
I let my guard down
And then you pulled the rug
I was getting kinda used to being someone you loved.”


When the day bleeds

Enfin rentrée à la maison après un retard de 13 heures en raison de la tempête Ciara, je me sentais soulagée, bien qu’un peu fatiguée, enfin prête à me remettre au travail. Je m’étais dit qu’avant, j’allais juste regarder deux ou trois clips en buvant une tasse de thé. J’ai lancé celui de “Someone you loved”, de Lewis Capaldi, je ne savais pas vraiment de quoi parlait la chanson, mais ma mère l’adore. J’avais évidemment compris à travers les paroles que c’était une chanson triste, mais bon dieu, je ne m’attendais pas à un tel clip… Ou peut-être que c’est à ma réaction que je ne m’attendais pas.

Cette courte vidéo m’a brisée en deux. En fait ça va, je vais bien, c’est juste la vie, on aura tou.te.s à vivre un deuil un jour, il n’y a rien de plus commun, de plus banal. L’ordinaire, lui aussi, peut déborder. Mais c’est marrant à quel point on arrive à croire que c’est bon, maintenant, que le “continuer” n’est plus si violent qu’il ne l’était, avant de ressentir d’un coup cette douleur aiguë, une douleur qu’aucune durée, qu’aucun amour ne peut guérir. Cette douleur tellement ordinaire de savoir que cette personne-là ne sourira jamais plus.

Si un avion Ryanair peut décoller et atterrir sans encombres à travers une tempête, je dois bien être capable de me remettre au travail après avoir chialé en regardant une vidéo de 4 minutes, non? Mais oui. J’en suis capable. Je suis juste un autre type de machine. Qui doit arrêter d’actionner les mauvais boutons. Ou alors, comprendre que je les actionne quand inconsciemment, j’en ressens le besoin. Vivre un deuil n’a pas à rentrer dans nos emplois du temps à la fois chargés et parfaitement calibrés. Ressentir le deuil, c’est aussi accepter de le laisser parfois saigner sur nos jours.

“Pour l’heure le jour saigne
colorant la nuit
Et tu n’es pas là
Pour le traverser avec moi.
Ma garde baissée,
Le sol s’ouvrant sous mes pas,
Je m’habituais tout juste à être aimé.e de toi”

Top

0

New Diagnosis

IMG_20191213_112238504_HDR

french flag pastel

There are results you fear more than others.

On Thursday night, I was rushed to the hospital. Hours earlier, my GP had asked me to see him, after my blood results had returned: it wasn’t said on the phone nor on the letter, but they were “quite alarming”, he confirmed when I met him. My blood sugar level was 17, when it should have been less than 5.4. A urine sample confirmed that my ketones level was 2.2, instead of an acceptable 0.6. I hadn’t even heard of ketones until that day. When the doctor said, « Your body has gone into starvation mode », I said, « Well I sure haven’t! » And I laughed. He didn’t.

– No, really. You need to go to the hospital right now for an assessment.
– And that would be to assess…?
– Do you have a history of diabetes in your family?

From then on it all went really fast, and a bit surreal. I was to go home, prepare an overnight bag in case the hospital wanted to keep me, wait for the ambulance. He said the words: « You’re diabetic ». Wait, am I? I would know it if I was, wouldn’t I? Wait! Wouldn’t I?

When the ambulance arrived, one of the two paramedics was quite surprised to see me « so well ». I tried to make a few jokes, to avoid showing I was uncomfortable myself. I didn’t tell him the reason I couldn’t drive was OCD. I just said as I always do, “I’m sorry I don’t drive”. He was cross someone had called an ambulance for me, when I could have gone in a car. I apologized again. He said it wasn’t my fault, but I was the one listening to him as he explained that I was “taking the space of a sick patient”. After that, we didn’t talk very much. Especially after he asked me about current medication as he was filling in a form on his Ipad, and I said Fluoxetine.

– And why are you taking it?
– OCD and depression.

I didn’t talk about the guilt.

At the hospital we went from service to service to see where I should go.

– You’ve got a bad foot?
– That? Oh, no, it’s nothing! Just a foot drop.
– Isn’t it why you’re here?
– No, it’s my blood.

They asked me to sit down in A&E. A little over two hours later, a nurse came to get me. I had tried to read a novel after seeing a sign on the wall: “4-5 hours on 12/12/19 @ 17.00 to be seen by a doctor from time of arrival.”

As blood formed droplets on my fingertips, people were voting for the future of the UK. The future of the NHS. I was worried. I had been for weeks. And now even this new diagnosis (I wasn’t sure: was it for certain yet? Were we still wondering if I had diabetes or was it a done deal?) wasn’t pushing the fear away. Quite the contrary: sat on a public hospital chair, being careful not to put blood everywhere, it was getting closer and closer. There I was, a European immigrant to the UK, waiting to be assessed for free by a medical system which had known cuts after cuts over the last few years.

My blood sugar level had increased. In French, when we worry, we say that we “make bad blood” (“se faire du mauvais sang”). I no longer wanted to laugh, though, sitting on a chair in this overcrowded ward. Half an hour passed. Or was it an hour? Minutes after they had admitted me in a cubicle for more blood tests, I could hear them talk behind the blue curtain: “It’s way too high. She needs to be seen by the doctor.” The nurse looked at my other arm, found a vein. It was only salted water, I was told.

It was about 10pm and the first estimates were in: Conservative 368, Labour 191. I switched off the phone screen. I didn’t feel like commenting at all. It was a done deal. If it turned out to be type 1, it’d have always been.

After three hours in the ward, I was moved to a different cubicle.

– So, you’re diabetic?
– Apparently so.
– You didn’t know?
– I definitely didn’t know.
– Why did you see your GP?
– Because of a foot drop. I’m also very dehydrated. I might have been drinking between 4 and 5 litres of water a day since September.
– Can you walk for me?

I walked for them.

Polling stations were now closed. It was 1am.

– At least I can confirm the results are back, and you’ve haven got Diabetic ketoacidosis.
– Oh, that’s good!
– You’re familiar with Diabetic ketoacidosis?
– Well, I’ve been reading the NHS website as I was waiting…

I was brought a bed. A stretcher, actually. I so wanted to lie down. Nurses could see this as I was shrinking on my chair, doing nothing – couldn’t read, nor my book or my phone. They spent their time apologizing: “Sorry you had to wait for so long, it’s so busy tonight. We have a bed shortage.” Like the man in the ambulance, it was my turn to say: “It isn’t your fault. Please don’t worry. It isn’t your fault.” The nurse injected insulin into my body for the very first time.

Votes were still being counted as I lay below the aggressive light of the ward. After one hour, I was given two blankets. I put one over my head to make it dark. The man waiting on another stretcher, next to me, said: “Well, now I’ve seen it all!” Later, he would give me money, asking me to go to the cafe (he couldn’t walk) and bring £70 worth of cake and biscuits for all the nurses. “It’s Christmas, after all.” The biscuits were tree-shaped and had red and gold topping. Tinsels had been stuck to the walls.

Every hour and a half since arrival, a nurse would check my temperature (36.4), my blood pressure (I have no idea what it was), my blood sugar level, sometimes my ketones level too (now 3.1). When my blood sugar level reached 25.8 around 3am, they said we needed to do it again, to make sure. It was too high, far too high. The new reading was 26.4. “If it isn’t better in one hour, we’ll need to give you more insulin”. I dropped in and out of sleep. It got better (19), and at about 5am I was moved to the Medical Assessment Unit. I wanted to walk, but they said: “No no no, stay on the stretcher.” Watching the ceiling unfold, I listened to the nurses’ conversation, and obviously didn’t understand who they were talking about, but someone had lost their baby. Sadness came to sit on my chest.

The new location was a lot more comfortable: there was a proper bed, and the lights were dim. I changed into the night gown they gave me, and tried to sleep.

From 7am onwards, I spent the day being seen by medical staff. I had my first education about diabetes. First, an expert came to explain what it was, remind me of the pancreas’ role, and why they thought there – as did my GP – that I was a type 1. Then another doctor came to explain how to use an insulin flexpen, and the reader I’ll be given to test my blood sugar level. I was given needles. Lancets. A yellow safe box to dispose of them. Another expert came to give me a whole pile of leaflets. One of them read: “Diabetes and emotional well-being”. There was some sort of magazine, too: “Everyday life with Type 1 diabetes”.

– So, that’s a bit of a shock, isn’t it?
– It is, I suppose.
– How do you feel about it all?
– Absolutely fine, thank you.
– Mmh. Are you sure?
– Yes, I am.
– You’re going to be okay.
– Oh, I know.
– Don’t worry.

Between discussions and blood controls, I watched my Facebook and Twitter timelines. The people of the UK had spoken, and I wasn’t best pleased with what they had to say – nor were most of my friends. I wasn’t alone. And Q. had said he would come straight after work if I needed to.

A newly diagnosed diabetic immigrant in a British hospital, I could finally go outside to smoke a cigarette, the first one in 14 hours. On my way to the main entrance, I noticed a plaque:

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of
the National Health Service
and
the official opening of
Derriford hospital
on 22nd August 1988
by
the Prime Minister
the right honourable
Margaret Thatcher, FRS MP

Speaking of important dates, it was now Friday 13th.

 


 

Nouveau diagnostic

Il y a des résultats qu’on redoute plus que d’autres.

Jeudi soir, j’ai été amenée d’urgence à l’hôpital. Quelques heures plus tôt, mon généraliste m’avait demandé de venir le voir après que mes analyses de sang étaient revenues : on ne me l’avait pas dit au téléphone ou sur la lettre, mais ils étaient « plutôt inquiétants », a-t-il annoncé quand je l’ai vu. Mon taux de glycémie était de 17, alors qu’il aurait dû être de moins de 5,4. Un examen d’urine confirma une présence de corps cétoniques de 2,2, au lieu d’un taux maximal de 0,6. Je n’avais jamais entendu parler de corps cétoniques jusqu’à ce jour. Quand le médecin m’a dit : « Votre corps s’est mis en mode ‘famine’ », j’ai répondu : « Ah bah pas moi, en tout cas ! », et j’ai ri. Lui non.

– Non, vraiment, vous devez aller à l’hôpital tout de suite pour de plus amples examens.
– Et qu’est-ce qu’on cherche, en fait ?
– Il y a des personnes diabétiques, dans votre famille ?

À partir de ce moment-là, c’est allé très vite. Et c’était un peu irréel. Je devais rentrer chez moi, préparer un sac pour la nuit au cas où on voudrait me garder à l’hôpital, et attendre l’ambulance. Il prononça les mots : « Vous êtes diabétique. » Attendez, vous êtes sûr ? Ça se saurait, si je l’étais non ? Attendez ! Ça se saurait, non ?

Quand l’ambulance est arrivée, un des deux ambulanciers a été très surpris de me voir « si en forme ». J’ai essayé de faire quelques blagues, pour ne pas montrer que je me sentais moi-même mal à l’aise. Je ne lui ai pas dit que la raison pour laquelle je ne conduisais pas, c’était les TOC. J’ai juste dit, comme je le fais toujours, « Excusez-moi, je ne conduis pas ». Il était énervé que quelqu’un ait appelé une ambulance pour loi, alors que j’aurais pu y aller en voiture. Je me suis excusée encore. Il a dit que ça n’était pas de ma faute, mais c’était bien moi qui l’écoutais me dire que je prenais « la place d’un patient malade ». Après ça, on n’a plus vraiment parlé. Surtout après qu’il m’a demandé de préciser les médicaments que je prenais actuellement, pour un formulaire qu’il remplissait sur son Ipad. J’ai dit de la Fluoxétine.

– Et pourquoi vous en prenez-vous ?
– TOC et dépression.

Je ne lui ai pas dit, pour la culpabilité.

À l’hôpital, nous sommes allés de service en service pour voir où je devais aller.

– Vous avez mal au pied?
– Ça ? Oh non, c’est rien, juste un steppage.
– C’est pas pour ça, que vous êtes ici ?
– Non, c’est à cause de mon sang.

On m’a demandé de m’asseoir aux urgences. Un peu plus de deux heures plus tard, une infirmière venait me chercher. J’avais essayé de lire un roman après avoir vu sur une ardoise, au mur : « 4 à 5 heures d’attente le 12/12/19 @ 17h avant de voir un médecin, à partir de votre heure d’arrivée ».

Alors que le sang perlait au bout de mes doigts, les gens votaient pour le futur du Royaume-Uni. Pour le futur de la NHS, le système britannique de Sécurité Sociale. J’avais peur. J’avais peur depuis des semaines. Et maintenant, même ce nouveau diagnostic (j’avais un doute : c’était sûr, du coup ? Est-ce qu’on se demandait encore si j’avais du diabète ou était-ce une affaire déjà réglée ?) ne repoussait pas cette peur-là. Au contraire : assise sur la chaise d’un hôpital public, attentive à ne pas mettre du sang partout, cette peur-là se faisait plus pressante. J’étais là, immigrée européenne au Royaume-Uni, attendant d’être traitée gratuitement par un système médical qui avait, ces dernières années, connu coupe budgétaire après coupe budgétaire.

Mon taux de glycémie avait augmenté. Je comprenais sous un jour nouveau l’expression « se faire du mauvais sang ». Je n’avais plus envie de rire, pourtant, assise sur cette chaise d’une salle bondée. Un demi-heure passa. Ou était-ce une heure ? Quelques minutes après m’avoir reçu dans un nouveau box, je les entendais parler derrière le rideau bleu : « C’est beaucoup trop élevé. Elle doit voir un docteur. » L’infirmière regarda ensuite mon autre bras, y trouva une veine. C’était simplement de l’eau salée, apparemment.

Il était à peu près 22h et on donnait les premières estimations. Parti conservateur 368, parti travailliste 191. J’éteignis l’écran de mon téléphone. Je n’avais même pas envie de commenter ça. L’affaire était réglée. Si c’était du type 1, ça avait même toujours été déjà réglé.

Après trois heures dans la salle, on m’amena à un autre box.

– Donc vous êtes diabétique ?
– Apparemment, oui.
– Vous ne le saviez pas ?
– Vraiment pas, non.
– Pourquoi êtes-vous allée chez votre médecin ?
– Parce que j’ai un steppage. Et je suis très déshydratée. Depuis septembre je dois boire 4 à 5 litres d’eau par jour.
– Pouvez-vous me montrer comment vous marchez ?

Alors j’ai marché.

Les bureaux de vote étaient bel et bien fermés. Il était 1h du matin.

– Au moins je peux vous confirmer que les résultats nous sont parvenus, et vous ne faites pas d’acidocétose diabétique.
– Ah, ça, c’est bien !
– Vous savez ce que c’est ?
– Disons que j’ai lu des trucs sur le site de la NHS en attendant…

On m’amena un lit. Un chariot brancard, en fait. J’avais tellement envie de m’allonger. Les infirmières le voyaient bien, alors que je me tassais de plus en plus sur ma chaise, lasse – je ne parvenais pas à lire, ni mon livre ni mon téléphone. Elles passaient leur temps à s’excuser : « Désolée de vous faire attendre si longtemps, il y a tellement de patient·e·s ce soir. Nous n’avons plus aucun lit de libre. » Comme l’ambulancier, c’était à mon tour de dire : « Vous n’y êtes pour rien. Ne vous inquiétez pas. Vous n’y êtes pour rien. » L’infirmière m’injecta de l’insuline dans le corps pour la toute première fois.

On comptabilisait encore les bulletins de vote à l’heure où je m’allongeais sous la lumière blafarde de la grande salle. Au bout d’une heure, on m’amena deux couvertures. J’en mis une sur ma tête pour qu’il fasse sombre, et l’homme sur le brancard à côté du mien déclara : « Ah ben j’aurais tout vu ! » Plus tard, il me donnerait de l’argent et me demanderait d’aller au café (il ne pouvait pas marcher) pour acheter £70 de gâteaux et de biscuits pour les infirmières. « C’est noël, après tout ! » Les biscuits avaient une forme de sapin et étaient décorés de rouge et d’or. Aux murs pendaient des guirlandes.

Chaque heure et demie, depuis mon arrivée, une infirmière avait vérifié ma température (36,4), ma tension (aucune idée de combien elle était), mon taux de glycémie, et parfois mon taux de corps cétoniques (à présent 3,1). Quand mon taux glycémique atteint 25,8 vers 3h du matin, elle me dit qu’il fallait le reprendre pour être bien sûres de ça. C’était trop élevé, bien trop élevé. La machine affiche 26,4. « Si ça ne s’améliore pas dans l’heure qui vient, on devra vous redonner une piqûre d’insuline. » Je restais vaguement assoupie. Le taux s’améliora (19), et vers 5 heures du matin on m’emmena dans une autre unité, la Medical Assessment Unit. Je voulais marcher pour y aller, mais on me dit: “Non non non, vous restez allongée là.” J’écoutais les infirmières discuter alors que se déroulait le plafond, et bien sûr je ne comprenais pas de qui elles parlaient, mais quelqu’un avait perdu son bébé. Le chagrin vint s’asseoir sur ma poitrine.

Le nouvel endroit où on m’amenait était bien plus confortable : il y avait un vrai lit, et la lumière était tamisée. Je passai la chemise de nuit qu’on m’avait donnée, et essayai de dormir.

À partir de 7h, je passais la journée à rencontrer le personnel médical. On m’apprit des choses sur le diabète. D’abord, un expert vint m’expliquer ce que c’était, me rappela le rôle du pancréas, m’expliqua pourquoi ils pensaient là-bas, comme mon généraliste, que j’étais de type 1. Puis une doctoresse vint m’expliquer comment utiliser un flexpen pour l’insuline, et la machine qu’on me donnerait pour contrôler mon taux de glucose. On me donna des aiguilles pour les piqûres, pour les prélèvements du sang. Une boîte jaune sécurisée pour les jeter. Une autre experte vint me donner une grosse pile de dépliants. Sur l’un deux, on lisait « Diabète et bien-être psychologique ». Il y avait aussi une sorte de magazine : « Le diabète de type 1 au quotidien ».

– Alors, c’est un peu un choc pour vous, non ?
– Oui, un peu.
– Comment vous vivez cette annonce ?
– Je la vis bien, merci.
– Mmh. Vous êtes sûre ?
– Oui oui.
– Ça va aller, vous aller voir.
– Oh, je sais bien.
– Ne vous inquiétez pas.

Entre les discussions et les contrôles sanguins, je consultais mes comptes Facebook et Twitter. Le peuple britannique s’était prononcé, et tout comme la plupart de mes ami·e·s, j’étais tout sauf heureuse de ce qu’il avait dit. Je n’étais pas seule. Q. avait dit qu’il viendrait tout de suite après le boulot si j’avais besoin.

Immigrante récemment diagnostiquée diabétique dans un hôpital britannique, je pus enfin aller fumer une cigarette dehors, la première en 14 heures. Sur mon chemin, je croisai cette plaque :

En commémoration du 40e anniversaire de la
NHS
et
de l’inauguration officielle de
l’hôpital de Derriford
le 22 août 1099
par la Première Ministre
la très honorable
Margaret Thatcher, FRS MP (Membre de la Société Royale)

En parlant de dates importantes, nous étions maintenant vendredi 13.

Top

0

Watching Notre Dame burn

french flag pastel

Notre Dame de Paris is on fire. The spire collapsed moments ago.

Like many people in France and worldwide, I’m watching the news unfold, the pictures getting tweeted, as I’m trying process what’s happening, and what it means. (How can I ever escape this need for meaning?)

It’s my worst nightmare, and it is happening.

As horrific as it is right now, in fairness the nightmare wasn’t necessarily about Notre Dame. In any building I enter, I’m terrified a fire will break out due to my negligence – or worse – due to an subconscious desire to destroy things and injure people… That’s my OCD, and it can prevent me from doing and enjoying anything, even the safety of my home, for months. Nowhere is safe anymore, when it’s particularly severe. So many vivid images of people crying out for help, encircled by flames – and I watch them, helpless, I watch them die, I watch the world disappear. It’s the stuff my days are made of. So I blink, real hard, to make it all go away. I say it aloud a few times. Like a magic formula. I ask someone to check after me. I ask my partner: ‘Did I switch off the gas?’
‘Yes you did.’
‘But did I really, really switch it off?’
‘You did.’
‘I’d better check though.’

I know it’s selfish, so terribly self-centered. A major monument of history is rapidly being destroyed under our eyes, under the now darker sky of Paris as times goes by, and I’m thinking about my own petty obsessions. My own debilitating guilt. To tell you the (ridiculous, I know) extent of my sense of guilt: I’m in Blois righ now, miles away from Paris, but I keep thinking I might well be responsible for part of it. Did I do anything bad today? Had any disrespectful thoughts? Was I offensive to anyone?

Some will be quick to point out that to feel guilty regarding anything linked to catholicism is hahaha so fitting. Please, pardon me as I’m not laughing.

Because you see, the fire seems, like in my worst nightmares, to have happened accidentally. One day, we’re likely to understand what has happened. From what I read online, it could be due to an accident linked to the current building works within the cathedral. There’s going to be guilt… Overwhelming guilt… And because people like to have someone to blame, some will probably say some very nasty stuff on Twitter, because they have nothing better to do… I’m thinking about that person, these people, anyone, who’s going to have to struggle with it. Who’s already watching this on their screen, the live destruction of one of France’s most famous landmarks, thinking: ‘Oh god oh god oh god I know it’s me! I shouldn’t have let this [fill as appropriate] on…’

Yes I’m hoping no one will be injured in any way. But I’m also hoping, just as much, that these people who’ve been working on the site are going to get support and help. Flames and guilt can be equally destructive.

Just like every day, with my brain squeaking from its very own inferno, all I can do is pray.

Please protect the people.
Please protect the people.
Please. Protect. The people.


Voir brûler Notre Dame

Top

Notre Dame de Paris brûle. Le flèche s’est effondrée il y a peu.

Comme beaucoup de gens en France et à l’étranger, je regarder les infos arriver, les photos se succéder sur Twitter, pendant que je tente de comprendre ce qui est en train de se passer, ce que ça signifie. (Comment sortir de ce besoin incessant de signification?)

C’est mon pire cauchemar, et il est en train de se réaliser.

Aussi abominable que cela soit maintenant, pour être honnête ce cauchemar n’est pas nécessairement lié à Notre Dame. Dans chaque bâtiment où j’entre, j’ai peur qu’un incendie se déclare suite à ma négligence, voire pire, à mon désir inconscient de détruire des choses et de blesser des gens… Ce sont mes TOC, et ils peuvent m’empêcher de faire ou d’apprécier quoi que ce soit, même dans en sécurité chez moi, des mois durant. Je ne me sens plus en sécurité nulle part, quand les troubles sont particulièrement aigus. Toutes ces images, tellement réelles, de gens criant à l’aide, encerclés par les flammes, et je les regarde mourir, je regarde le monde disparaître. C’est de cette étoffe-là que sont faits mes jours. Alors je cligne des yeux très fort, pour que tout s’en aille. Je le dis à voix haute plusieurs fois. Comme une formule magique. Je demande à quelqu’un de vérifier derrière moi. Je demande à mon compagnon: “Est-ce que j’ai bien fermé le gaz?
– Oui, tu l’as fermé.
– Mais est-ce que je l’ai vraiment fermé?
– Oui.
– Je devrais sûrement aller vérifier.”

Je sais comme c’est égoïste et terriblement nombriliste. Un monument majeur de l’histoire est en train d’être rapidement détruit sous nos yeux, sous le ciel maintenant assombri de Paris alors que les heures avancent, et je pense à mes petites obsessions personnelles. Pour vous dire le niveau (ridicule, je sais) de mon sentiment de culpabilité: je suis actuellement à Blois, donc à des kilomètres de Paris, mais je n’arrête pas de penser que j’en suis peut-être responsable au moins en partie: est-ce que j’ai fait quelque chose de mal aujourd’hui? Eu des pensées irrespectueuses? Est-ce que j’ai heurté quelqu’un?

Certains n’hésiteront pas à me faire rapidement remarquer que se sentir coupable pour quelque chose en lien avec le catholicisme est hahaha tellement drôle. Pardon si je ne rigole pas, là.

Parce que voyez-vous, cet incendie semble, comme dans mes pires cauchemars, être d’origine accidentelle. Un jour, on comprendra sûrement ce qui s’est passé. De ce que je lis sur Internet, ça pourrait être du à un accident lié aux travaux actuels dans les combles de la cathédrale. Il y aura des gens qui se sentiront coupable… Une culpabilité écrasante… Et parce que les gens aiment avoir quelqu’un à blâmer, certains diront certainement des choses atroces sur Twitter, puisqu’ils n’ont rien de mieux à faire… Je pense à cette personne, à ces gens, quels qu’ils soient, qui vont avoir à y faire face. À ce quelqu’un qui regarde en ce moment même les infos sur son écran, la retransmission en direct de la destruction d’un des plus importants monuments de Paris, en pensant: “oh mon dieu oh mon dieu oh mon dieu, je sais que c’est moi! Je n’aurais pas dû laisser [remplissez à votre guise] allumé…”

Oui, j’espère que personne ne sera blessé, d’aucune façon. Mais j’espère aussi, j’espère tout autant, que les gens qui ont travaillé sur le site seront soutenus et pris en charge. Les flammes et la culpabilité peuvent détruire autant.

Comme tous les jours, mon cerveau grinçant de son propre enfer, tout ce que je peux faire, c’est prier.

Je vous en prie protégez-les.
Je vous en prie protégez-les.
Je vous en prie. Protégez. Les…

Top

0

When rush hour is in your brain

 

french flag pastel

I hate my brain so much. Almost as much as this insufferable afternoon. Sudden change of plans 4 times in one hour, feeling like you’re not finishing anything you’ve started, rushing everywhere, concentrating so damn hard on fighting the tears in response to the nasty voices in your head saying you’re letting everyone down… My nightmare scenario. I won’t be travelling again that far for a while…. More importantly, tonight I’ll be needing calm and alone time. I’ll feel better soon so don’t want anyone to worry, but this is why I still carry Diazepam with me everywhere I go. Thank god (and science) for Diazepam.


Ton cerveau à l’heure de pointe

Je déteste mon cerveau, presqu’autant que cet après-midi ingérable. Devoir changer son itinéraire quatre fois en une heure, sentir qu’on ne finit rien de ce qu’on a commencé, courir partout, utiliser toute sa concentration à ne pas chialer en entendant dans sa tête ces foutues voix qui te disent que tu fous tout le monde dans la merde… Mon scénario cauchemar. Laissez-moi vous dire que je ne vais pas faire de grand trajet pendant un petit moment… Et ce soir, je vais avoir besoin de calme et de solitude. Que personne me s’inquiète, ça va vite aller mieux, mais voilà pourquoi je me balade encore avec mon Diazepam de partout. Que dieu (et la science) bénisse(nt) le Diazepam.

Top

3

On Failing

french flag pastel

Because I have two books published, and have received awards, funding, and invitations at various events for my writing, it is quite common for people to see me as someone who always – or at least very often – succeeds. I’m extremely happy about any of my accomplishments, but although I would love this success story to be true, it simply isn’t.

At least there isn’t in the UK this toxic idea that France still encourage so readily: that writers are inspired geniuses, who just sit there for a while, wait for some divine inspiration to strike, and then write their whole new book in a week, or a new poem in 20 minutes, and it’s read worldwide at once, and we’re all in awe of such great minds. Well, I don’t know about other people, and I’m sure it’s different for everyone, but I sure have to work very hard every time I write a text, however short. I work for hours, weeks, on a piece of just 20 lines. The heartbreaking thing being that I may have worked for hours for a text that is just, well… not good. And I know I won’t be using it. So it ends up in the bin. And I start all over again.

When I do find the text good, though, after my perfectionism has visited numerous times, I usually want to use it for something. To publish it somewhere. Easy, you think? Haha. I wish. No, I mean, I truly wish, I’m not going to lie. I’d love to have that amount of social recognition that means every single thing you write is going to be accepted in acclaimed magazines as soon as you email the editor. I would even love to be famous enough to know that every single book I write is going to be a best-seller. Not because of the fame or applause, but because I could actually make a living out of my writing, and never need another job ever again. That’s my absolute fantasy: write and read all day. No need for an idyllic location or overflowing bank account, just write whenever I like.
That is so not my situation, however. I write because I can’t imagine a single week without writing. Like I can’t imagine not reading for more than two days in a row. And because I want my texts to exist for others too, I try to get my text published. And it’s a hard, competitive, often discouraging process.

It’s a bit like your stats on your blog. I love my blogs, and because I’m active on social media, I’m sure some people think my blogs are read every day by hundreds of people. Hahaha! They’re so not! And that’s okay. But honestly, we need to stop that obsession and shame about blog stats: sometimes, my blogs aren’t visited by a single person for days. Sometimes, I get one visit in a full week. Nonetheless, I still love blogging, and will keep doing it. Of course I’d love to be read more often, by more people. I mean, come on, why would you use blogging if that wasn’t to find readers? But I’m fine with things as they are, and I want to reassure the many bloggers or social media fans I’ve met: the vast majority of blogs have an extremely small number of readers. And it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t exist.


I want to say all this because I often read interviews where writers say: ‘this is the very first time I enter a competition, so I couldn’t really believe it when I was told I got the first prize and later sold 300,000 copies of my book, now translated in 28 languages.’ These people are amazing and I’m truly happy for them! Actually, I usually read their work, because I think it must be exceptional on some level to have been spotted on their very first try. But that’s not me. I have sent my writing to so many competitions, magazines, journals, without even being shortlisted. I know I shouldn’t say this. Because the first thing you’d think, then, is: ‘well, that just means your writing wasn’t good enough’. I honestly think sometimes, it was true, and I worked again on my piece and made it way better. But I think that most of the times, rejection came for many, many other reasons: there are so many entries, and so many brilliant entries, even when you entered with your best piece it may not be spotted among the hundreds of submissions. And another judge may have shortlisted you, but not that one. All of this to say, my work has been rejected dozens of times. Maybe hundreds if I count every competition I entered since I was 14, every publisher I contacted, every journal I emailed my poems to. I just keep working.

So when I announce some great news on social media, it means that it’s one of these rare occurrences when I received an email starting with: ‘Congratulations’. And I’m bursting with joy and gratefulness, honestly I am. I then try to give a real existence to every single piece of work that manages to get out there. Because we all know a text is nothing if not read. So after having worked on getting a piece published, I work on getting this text to potential readers. And because I don’t believe in straightforward, opportunistic self-publicity, it takes an incredibly high amount of time, energy, and patience. But that’s okay. It’s all part of the job, and it’s a job I just wish I could do more.


You see, we’re quite far from the story people usually expect me to tell: ‘Oh, I sent it to that one publisher, they thought it was the most amazing thing they had read since Flaubert, so they decided to publish my text and offer me a five-digit salary’.

Yet I’m not finished. I like to be challenged and try new things, therefore I send a lot of emails, letters, and parcels – many places still don’t accept electronic submissions. More often than not, what I get is a simple type-thing rejection. ‘We are sorry to let you know that after careful consideration…’ And every single time, I have to deal with disappointment. It doesn’t get any easier. Every single time, I’m deeply disappointed, because of course I wouldn’t even consider submitting something if I didn’t believe in it. If I didn’t believe it could get read, selected, published, I wouldn’t waste anyone else’s time. So the thing I’ve done most, as a writer, is learn to live with disappointment and multiple failures. These days, the word ‘failure’ is not particularly trending. We want to make it more positive, ‘oh, but you learnt something from it’. Hell, yeah, but mostly, the lesson was about being disappointed again. Of course I keep going. Of course. But every single time, sorry if I appear childish or arrogant, it hurts. You may know on a rational level not to take things personally, but especially if you feel down at that time, that all sounds like a beautiful lie. I don’t show it because you don’t have time to really show it, you need to work on your writing.


I’ve talked mainly about writing, but it was the same for job applications. I have a PhD, so you see, it’s something people usually associate with an extremely successful life. Though I’ve been rejected many times for positions I really thought I could get, and god knows I doubt myself. I’ve been to interviews and thought it went really well for once, only to have the rejection email waiting three hours later in my inbox. That was freaking hard. Much more so than the writing, because it was of course a question of financial necessity, there: I needed to work, if only just to pay my rent. And yet: ‘no’, ‘no’, ‘no’, ‘no’. Sometimes ‘yes’, but mostly: ‘no’.

So I want to destroy a few myths here.
1. Most people, even the most successful ones, are not successful all the time. Of course they live with rejection. Probably a lot of them, actually. The only thing is: they don’t talk about it.
2. You can’t always turn a failure into something positive. And that’s fine, because it’s not supposed to be. Sometimes, it just sucks. Awesome people around you, I’m sure, will be happy to hear you say just that, and won’t insist on your ‘looking on the bright side’.
3. But in order to sometimes succeed, to get your art and ideas considered, you need to be prepared for rejection. Not as in ‘oh I don’t care, resentment and bitterness is something I never feel’ (who are these people?!), but ‘one day, it will work, because I’ll bloody work for it until it works’.


I don’t believe in inspiration as the main source of writing, or success. I believe in dedication, focus, tenacity. Sorry, it certainly doesn’t sound as romantic. I know I still have many failures ahead of me. I’d love not to, but I’m not naive. I won’t pretend it won’t hurt. I know that every single time it will be painful. But hey, I’ll keep going, and want to encourage you to do the same, because I suspect we are in fact the vast majority. Nothing unusual here, so keep trying.


À propos de l’échec

Parce que j’ai publié deux livres, et que j’ai reçu des distinctions, des bourses et des invitations à divers événements du fait de mon écriture, il est relativement courant que les gens me voient comme quelqu’un qui réussit toujours (ou du moins très souvent) ce qu’elle entreprend. Je suis infiniment heureuse de chaque chose que j’ai accomplie, mais bien que j’aimerais que cette histoire de succès soit la mienne, ça n’est absolument pas le cas.

Au moins, il n’y a pas au Royaume-Uni cette idée toxique qu’on encourage si volontiers en France : celle selon laquelle les écrivain·e·s ne sont que des génies inspirés, qui s’assoient juste un moment, attendent l’inspiration divine, et hop écrivent leur nouveau livre en une semaine, ou un nouveau poème en 20 minutes, et ce texte est lu dans le monde entier dans la foulée, et nous voilà en admiration béate devant de si grands esprits. Alors, je ne sais pas pour les autres, et je suis sûre que ça dépend tout simplement des gens, mais en tout cas pour ma part je dois travailler dur et longtemps à chaque fois que j’écris un texte, même s’il est court. Je travaille pendant des heures, des semaines, sur un texte de vingt lignes. Et le pire, c’est qu’il est possible que j’aie passé tout ce temps sur un texte qui n’est tout simplement… pas bon. Et je sais que je n’en ferai rien. Il part à la poubelle, et je recommence à nouveau.

Quand je pense que le texte est bon, cependant, après que mon perfectionnisme soit venu me rendre ses fréquentes visites, généralement j’espère en faire quelque chose. Le publier quelque part. Facile, vous dites ? Haha. J’aimerais bien. Non, je suis sérieuse là, j’aimerais vraiment, je ne vais pas mentir. J’aimerais beaucoup avoir ce niveau de reconnaissance sociale qui fait que chaque chose qu’on écrit sera accepté dans les magazines les plus reconnus, dès que son éditeur·trice reçoit notre courriel. J’aimerais même être suffisamment célèbre pour savoir que n’importe quel livre que je publierai sera un best-seller. Ni pour la gloire ni pour les lauriers, mais parce que je pourrais alors en vivre, d’écrire, et que je n’aurais plus jamais besoin d’avoir un autre emploi à côté. C’est mon grand fantasme : écrire et lire toute la journée. Pas besoin d’un lieu paradisiaque ou d’un compte en banque plein à craquer, juste pouvoir écrire quand je le souhaite.

Or ça n’est pas, mais alors pas du tout, ma situation. J’écris car je ne peux pas imaginer une seule semaine sans écrire. Comme je ne peux imaginer ne pas lire plus de deux jours de suite. Et parce que je veux que mes textes existent pour d’autres, j’essaie que mes textes soient publiés. Et c’est un processus difficile, compétitif, et souvent décourageant.


C’est un peu comme les statistiques d’un blog. J’adore mes blogs, et parce que je suis active sur les réseaux sociaux, je suis sûre que certain·e·s s’imaginent que mes billets sont lus tous les jours par des centaines de gens. Alors là, hahaha ! Pas du tout, désolée. Mais ça n’est pas grave. Honnêtement, il faut vraiment qu’on arrête avec cette obsession et cette honte que l’on s’inflige concernant les statistiques de lecture : parfois mes blogs ne comptent pas même une seule visite pendant plusieurs jours. Parfois, j’atteins une unique visite sur toute la semaine. Pourtant, j’aime blogguer et continuerai à le faire. Bien sûre que j’aimerais être lue plus souvent, par plus de gens. Pourquoi est-ce qu’on ouvrirait un blogue, si ça n’était pas pour trouver un lectorat ? Mais je suis contente des choses telles qu’elles le sont aujourd’hui, et je veux rassurer les nombreux bloggueurs·euses et fans de réseaux sociaux que j’ai recontré·e·s : la vaste majorité des blogues ont un nombre de lecteurs·trices extrêmement restreint. Et ça ne veut pas dire qu’ils ne devraient pas exister.


Je tiens à dire tout ça car je lis souvent des entretiens où des écrivain·e·s déclarent : « c’est la première fois que je participe à un concours, alors vraiment je n’arrivais pas à y croire quand on m’a dit que j’avais gagné le premier prix, et qu’ensuite mon livre s’était écoulé à 300 000 exemplaires et avait été traduit en 28 langues. » Ces gens sont géniaux et je suis, du fond du cœur, ravie pour eux ! D’ailleurs, généralement je vais lire leurs écrits, parce que je me dis qu’ils sont forcément exceptionnels pour avoir été repérés comme ça, du premier coup. Mais en tout cas, ça n’est pas mon histoire. J’ai envoyé mes écrits à de nombreux concours, magazines, journaux, sans même faire partie de la pré-sélection. Je sais que je ne devrais pas dire ça. Car du coup, la première chose que vous allez vous dire, c’est : « oui, ben ça veut juste dire que tes textes n’étaient pas aussi bons que ça. » Je pense sincèrement que parfois oui, c’était le cas, et ça m’a poussée à retravailler un texte pour le rendre meilleur. Mais je pense que dans la majorité des cas, je n’ai pas été retenue pour tout un tas d’autres raisons : il y a tellement de candidatures, et d’excellentes candidatures, même quand on envoie son meilleur texte il est possible qu’il ne soit pas repéré parmi ces centaines de candidat·e·s. Et un autre juge vous aurait peut-être sélectionné·e, mais celui-là·celle-là, non. Tout ça pour dire que mon travail n’a pas été retenu des dizaines de fois. Et peut-être même des centaines, si je prends en compte tous les concours auxquels j’ai participé depuis mes 14 ans, toutes les maisons d’édition que j’ai contactées, tous les magazines auxquels j’ai envoyé mes poèmes. Je continue de travailler.

Alors quand j’annonce une bonne nouvelle sur les réseaux sociaux, ça veut dire que c’est là l’une de ces rares fois où j’ai reçu un courriel qui commençait par: “Félicitations”. Et j’explose de joie et de gratitude, vraiment. Ensuite, j’essaie de donner une existence réelle à chacun des textes qui atteint la publication. Parce qu’on sait tou·te·s qu’un texte n’est rien s’il n’est pas lu. Donc après avoir travaillé pour qu’un texte soit publié, je travaille pour qu’il trouve ses potentiel·le·s lecteurs·trices. Et comme je ne crois pas à l’autopromotion directe et opportuniste, ça prend énormément de temps, d’énergie et de patience. Mais ça ne fait rien. Ça fait partie du boulot, et c’est justement un boulot que j’aimerais tellement faire à plein temps.


Vous voyez, on est bien loin de l’histoire que les gens s’attendent généralement à ce que je raconte : « Oh, j’ai envoyé ça à une maison d’édition, qui a pensé que c’était la chose la plus extraordinaire qu’ils·elles avaient lu depuis Flaubert, donc ils·elles ont décidé de publier mon texte et de me donner un salaire à 5 chiffres. »

Et je n’ai même pas fini. Comme j’aime expérimenter et essayer des choses nouvelles, j’envoie énormément de courriels, de lettres, de colis (beaucoup d’endroits refusent encore les envois électroniques). La plupart du temps, ce que je reçois en retour, c’est une lettre-type de refus. « Nous sommes au regret de vous dire qu’après avoir lu avec attention… » et chaque fois, il me faut faire avec cette déception. Ça ne devient pas plus facile avec le temps. Chaque fois, je suis profondément déçue, parce qu’évidemment il ne me viendrait même pas à l’esprit de proposer quelque chose si je n’y croyais pas. Si je ne croyais pas que ce texte pouvait être lu, sélectionné, publié, je ne me permettrais pas de demander à quelqu’un d’y consacrer au moins un peu de son précieux temps. Finalement, la chose que j’ai faite le plus souvent, en tant qu’écrivaine, c’est apprendre à vivre avec la déception et les nombreux échecs. À notre époque, le mot « échec » n’est plus vraiment tendance. On veut lui donner un air positif, « oh, mais tu as dû apprendre de cette expérience ». Alors d’accord, j’ai appris, mais généralement l’apprentissage se limitait surtout à être une fois de plus déçue. Bien sûr que je continue quand même. Bien sûr. Mais à chaque fois, et désolée si je parais infantile ou arrogante, à chaque fois ça fait mal. On a beau savoir qu’il ne faudrait pas, d’un point de vue rationnel, prendre les choses personnellement, ça a tout l’air d’un mensonge bien déguisé dans ces moments où on se sent déprimé·e. Je ne le montre pas car évidemment on n’a pas le temps de le montrer, il faut se remettre à bosser son écriture.


J’ai surtout parlé d’écriture, ici, mais c’était pareil pour mes demandes d’emploi. J’ai un doctorat, ce qui est généralement quelque chose que les gens associent à une vie de réussite. Pourtant je n’ai pas été retenue plein de fois pour des emplois dont je me sentais vraiment capable, et dieu sait si je peux douter de moi. J’ai été invitée à des entretiens, en suis ressortie en pensant que pour une fois, ça s’était très bien passé, tout ça pour trouver le courriel de rejet de candidature attendant bien tranquille trois heures après dans ma boîte mail. Bordel, c’était dur. Bien plus que l’écriture, parce que bien sûr il s’agissait là de nécessités financières : je devais absolument trouver un emploi, ne serait-ce que pour payer le loyer. Et pourtant : “non”, “non”, “non”, “non”. Parfois “oui”. Mais la plupart du temps: “non”.


Alors je voulais m’en prendre à quelques mythes, ici.
1. La plupart des gens, même ceux qu’on considère comme ayant le plus de succès, n’ont pas de succès tout le temps. Évidemment que ces gens doivent gérer les refus. Probablement pas mal de refus, d’ailleurs. La seule chose, c’est qu’ils n’en parlent pas.
2. On ne peut pas toujours faire d’un échec quelque chose de positif. Et ça n’est pas grave, parce que ça n’est pas comme ça que ça marche. Parfois, ça casse juste vraiment les coui**es. Et les gens formidables qui vous entourent seront, j’en suis convaincue, absolument capables de vous entendre dire simplement ça, et n’insisteront pas pour que « vous voyiez les choses du bon côté ».
3. Mais pour réussir parfois, pour que votre travail et vos idées soient prises en compte, vous devez vous préparez au refus. Non pas dans le sens « oh, ça m’est égal, moi le ressentiment et l’amertume, ce sont des choses que je ne ressens jamais » (non mais ça existe, des gens comme ça ?!), mais dans le sens : « un jour, ça marchera, parce que je compte bien bosser jusqu’à ce que ça marche ».


Je ne crois pas à l’inspiration comme source majeure d’écriture, ni de réussite. Je crois au dévouement, à la concentration, à la ténacité. Désolée, ça ne fait pas aussi romantique. Je sais que j’ai encore plein d’échecs à venir. J’aimerais vraiment que ça ne soit pas le cas, mais je ne suis pas naïve. Je ne vais pas faire semblant que ça ne m’atteindra pas. Je sais qu’à chaque fois, ça fera mal. Mais je continuerai malgré tout, et je veux vous encourager à faire de même, parce que quelque chose me dit que nous représentons la majorité. Il n’y a rien de particulièrement rare là-dedans, alors continuez d’essayer.

Top

1

How Academia Actively Encourages the Development of Mental Illness

french flag pastel

Once upon a time, I worked in academia. Not for long. Just the time to teach while I was doing my PhD, then work as a language assistant for a year and a half. Therefore I haven’t been inside academia for quite some time now. Since the end of 2013, to be exact. And yet, and yet… that’s one topic that’s constantly on my mind.

It’s hard for me to write about it, because the imposter syndrome is still there; who am I to talk about this anyway? In addition, I fear that people may conflate some general reflection about academia with targeted accusations of specific people and institutions. Let me thus say it loud and clear: all in all, I haven’t been unlucky in my academic background. Clearly, some people I met along the way helped me – for a time at least – not to drown. I can’t help it, though. I need to talk again about this edifying fact: everyday, in the UK (where I’m writing) and elsewhere (should you want to comment too about your own environment), people working in academia are shamelessly encouraged to develop mental illness. I know it’s a strong accusation. And I mean every word of it. It’s true of other sectors, and this might serve as a wider critique of today’s working condition everywhere, but I’m talking about the one I know best.


Let’s start with this, because it so often is the reason why people don’t speak out: academia still appears to an outsider (or an academic-to-be) to be a very privileged area, characterized by extremely high salaries, equally high social status, and incredibly good work conditions. Yet I haven’t met any of these people. Not that the rich, upper-class, relaxed academics don’t exist. Of course they do. I don’t know, maybe they’re one hundred in the country. All the people I know working in academia have at least failed to meet part of those expectations. But because this still seems like a dream job for so many, they don’t let themselves question it and feel inclined to actually thanking those who exploit them – it’s so lucky, to be there. And that’s true, it is, there are so few positions. Many of them have been surviving for years (often before they give up, exhausted, and chose another career) from one precarious contract to another precarious contract. Not only has job security become unachievable, but these people are being poorly paid. For instance, it has become common practice to pay lecturers nine months a year, even though they can’t work elsewhere for the remaining three months due to research commitments and other admin duties. Even worse: many (if not most of) contracts are for a few hours a week only (check jobs.ac.uk and you’ll see the 0.1FTE…). This means that people are actually paying for the privilege of working in academia, since they know any gap in their CV is too high a risk to take, and they should accept any position regardless. Competition has never been so rough: hundreds of CVs are received for a single position, leading people to be in a constant competition with themselves and their peers. They can’t move places, as they don’t know how long they’ll be working somewhere. When they start to work at some University, because the contract is fixed-term, they haven’t even prepared their classes for the year that they already need to start sending in applications for what’s next. Their relationships (friends, family, significant others) are totally destroyed by the lack of certainty they live in that has become routine practice. In no other sector do you apply to jobs so widely geographically due to the poor prospects of the job market. In no other sector does an employee pay such high amounts to attend conferences they need intellectually and professionally. And the good working conditions usually only mean that yeah, that’s correct, academics can usually ‘decide’ where and when to work. Though by where and when, we mean: in their office when they’re lucky enough to have one, or to share one, and all the time of course, because hey, work-life balance has never been such an utopia in academia.

The above paragraph will I hope have reassured you: it’s not because you’re in academia that you should be thankful for people exploiting you and capitalizing on stretching your working hours and adding to your workload until you collapse.
I live with OCD and depression, and although academia didn’t create those conditions, it certainly help them flourish. It could have the same negative effect on mental health conditions including, but not limited to: anxiety, addictions, mania, paranoia, phobias, bipolar disorder, low self-esteem, self-harm, extreme fatigue, sleep problems, eating disorders, and suicidal thoughts. This is true of both staff and students. And we need to address this as a matter of emergency.

For students, the growing financial pressures are putting them in a position where they can’t afford to fail. They simply can’t. Which is a problem, you see, because failing is part of any educational programme. Not because some should, but because it’s okay if some do. That’s why in theory you can re-sit an exam, re-do a year, etc. But how can students even consider that, when merely completing a degree will leave them in debt for, at the very least, 10 years? Have you ever asked an anxious person how they deal with such pressure? When they’re scared about re-payment before they’ve even spent the credit they’ve been given?

Graduate students also generally have an additional teaching workload, and some admin to do. This is all fair enough, as this is supposed to help them get a job afterwards. But on top of growing teaching demands due to financial departmental restrictions, they’re being told that they should prioritise publishing. They need to publish. Publish or perish, but really it’s not even a choice. It’s: publish, period. It’s a well-known fact that you won’t get an academic job nowadays unless you’ve published what was beforehand considered good enough for a lecturer with ten-year experience.

For teaching staff, the pressure is getting ridiculous to the point that I sometimes wonder, horrified, if we aren’t being filmed for a reality show about how little sleep a lecturer can work under before turning into a zombie… Honestly. Again, contrary to what popular imagery would have you believe, the life of a teaching and/or researching academic is ridiculously packed: they get asked to do more and more; never, ever, the whole time I’ve been there and beyond, have I seen things ‘taken off’ from their shoulders in compensation. It only goes that way: more, more, more. They are supposed to: bring more money (yes, this first) through funding and partnerships, teach more, be evaluated more often by more people, do more presence hours, do more student support, deal with more difficult situations (some created by the very structure of academia today), be more present on campuses, write more, grade more papers, write more feedback, publish more, supervise more, organise more events, promote their institutions more, engage with the public more. Now bear in mind that anyone coming from what I’ll call a non-traditional background for academia will generally work ten times harder to prove they deserve to be there: gender, race, class, disability, are all factors which impact your need to work harder to prove (mostly to yourself) that you’re not an imposter.


It’s funny how phrases like “work-life balance” have become trendy in today’s hypocritical work circles. Don’t get me wrong: work-life balance is not an empty phrase, it’s so important. But tricking staff in believing they are cared for because you invite them to an afternoon on “work-life balance” is morally and logically wrong. You might as well give them a free afternoon. That’s honestly what they need. And even then, they’d probably lock themselves in trying to finish that paper with a two-weeks past deadline. Because academics are always behind schedule. If they’re not, they’re made to feel that way: what is it they’re not doing to have any free time? There’s always more you can do, in an environment defined by the absence of boundaries between private and professional life.

Choosing academia is to choose a life perpetually defined by deadlines. A life when you can never truly feel like you’re done for the day/for the week/ for the month. You live with the constant feeling that you should be working. You think about it in bed, and during weekends. Holiday? Haha. Don’t even go there. Do you mean that time of year where academics answer their emails at 6am in the hotel room before heading, filled with guilt, to the beach?


Sure, there are people who don’t work much in academia. And I’ll tell you who they are. They won’t even be ashamed, they’re actually quite proud of it: these are entitled people. People who’ve never even once considered the fact that maybe, they should work to get (and remain) there. It was a given. Usually thanks to factors they have no merit for (being born in the appropriate class, in the appropriately affluent country, helps an awful lot).


And that’s why it’s so risky. Of course these entitled people would tell me, and other staff, ‘not to worry’. It’s because they hardly ever do. But imagine being anxious to start with. And having every single one of your action and non-action evaluated by your boss, your peers, people funding you. Imagine when every single article, to get a good evaluation in the REF (Research Excellence Framework), which you need to secure a job and good working relationships, needs to be of exceptional standards, in an exceptional journal, at an exceptionally timely moment. Imagine being constantly asked to imagine what could go wrong in a class, being asked to analyse your failures before you even failed: imagine someone already drawn to paranoia or phobia filling out risk assessment after risk assessment, being told they need to adapt their 50-minute class to 14 different learning styles, change activities every five minutes to keep everyone’s attention. Now, imagine you do all this with OCD, an illness that in itself is about checking, checking again, and never trusting yourself to make things right. Imagine doing this with anxiety, waking up at night thinking: ‘what if this student makes an appeal because of the grade I gave them?’ Imagine having depression and low-self esteem and thinking: ‘who am I to even judge them?’ while grading paper. And imagine never having a proper, long break, like anyone deserves. Some time where nothing massively important needs to be put ‘on hold’. Some time where your mind can actually rest, since it’s on so much pressure all year round.


I’ve drowned completely. I really have. Not just because of all this, but yes, partly because of all this. It was never enough. Even when supported by the kindest, most humane and understanding people, I couldn’t see myself as anything else than a failure. Because I’ve been lucky enough to benefit from incredible support, the least I can do is say what people in this area don’t dare to say. I know how it is. While working in academia, you never want to be heard saying that you’re unsure of yourself, that you may need a break. You think that everybody else will think you don’t measure up to the task. You fear you’ll never been given responsibilities and promotion if you do say that. You believe you’ll lose all credibility towards colleagues and students alike if you let your quality standards go down, if – god forbid, you publish a frankly poor piece. What will happen to your next funding application then? Well, I no longer care about any of that. I have nothing to lose, everything to win. Each person who knows they’re not alone feeling in this is a victory. Every person who start thinking: ‘wait… Are we making this right?’ is a victory.

Never lose sight of the fact that most lecturers and teachers become so precisely because they care about the impact they have on students. Someone who doesn’t care won’t care any more because you pressure them; they just don’t. But anyone who does care, from the beginning, don’t need to feel that oppressed. They will be piling up things to do, reports to write, duties to perform until one day they’ll collapse – this may be when they retire, taking the form of regrets, as not all exhausted people burn out.


So let me please address all these people deciding the fate of Universities, students and academics: don’t lose the best, most dedicated and kind staff because you fail to see they’re reaching their limits. And above all, don’t pretend you don’t see it. We all do.

Too many friends risk loosing themselves to extreme exhaustion. I will hold you accountable.


Quand le système universitaire favorise le développement de troubles psychologiques

Il y a de cela longtemps déjà, j’ai travaillé dans le milieu universitaire. Pas pendant longtemps, juste celui de donner des cours en faisant mon doctorat, et ensuite de travailler en tant qu’assistante de langue pendant un an et demi. De ce fait, je n’ai pas été dans le système universitaire depuis un moment déjà. Depuis fin 2013, pour être exacte. Et pourtant, pourtant… c’est un sujet qui ne quitte jamais mon esprit.

C’est difficile pour moi d’écrire là-dessus, car le syndrome de l’imposteur rôde encore ; qui suis-je, de toute façon, pour parler de ça ? J’ai également peur que des gens prennent une réflexion globale sur le système universitaire pour des accusations dirigées vers des cibles (personnes ou institutions) spécifiques. Laissez-moi donc être claire dès le départ : en définitive, je n’ai pas été malchanceuse dans mon parcours à l’Université. Indéniablement, certaines personnes croisées sur mon chemin m’ont même aidée, au moins pour un temps, à tenir bon. Mais je ne peux pas lutter contre ça : il me faut parler encore de ce fait édifiant : chaque jour, au Royaume-Uni (où j’écris) et ailleurs (si vous désirez commenter à propos de votre propre environnement), on encourage les universitaires à développer des troubles psychologiques. Je sais que c’est une accusation grave. J’ai bien pesé tous mes mots. C’est vrai de tous les secteurs, et cela peut être une manière de contribuer à la critique du monde du travail actuel en général, mais je parlerai ici de ce que je connais le mieux.

Commençons par ce qui empêche généralement les premiers et premières concerné.e.s de parler : le monde universitaire apparaît encore, pour un regard extérieur (ou aux yeux d’un.e universitaire en devenir), comme une sphère éminemment privilégiée, caractérisée par des salaires extrêmement élevés, un statut social pareillement élevé, et des conditions de travail incroyablement bonnes. Pourtant, je n’ai rencontré aucun de ces gens-là. Non pas que la catégorie de riches bourgeois universitaires détendus n’existe pas. Bien sûr qu’elle existe. Ils sont peut-être, je ne sais pas, cent en tout dans le pays. Tous les gens que je connais qui travaillent dans le monde universitaire ne satisfont pas plusieurs de ces critères, mais comme ce travail fait rêver, ils ne se permettent pas de le critiquer et ont tendance à vouloir jusqu’à remercier ceux qui les exploitent, tant ils considèrent cela comme une chance (c’est une chance, en un sens, les places sont tellement rares). Beaucoup de ces gens que je connais survivent depuis des années (avant, souvent, de laisser tomber, épuisé.e, et changer de carrière) de contrat précaire en contrat précaire. Non seulement la sécurité de l’emploi est devenue inatteignable, mais ces gens-là sont très mal payés. Par exemple, il est devenu courant de ne payer ses maître.sse.s de conférence que neuf mois par an, bien que ces mêmes personnes ne puissent pas travailler ailleurs les trois mois restants, en raison d’engagement de recherche ou de tâches administratives. Pire : beaucoup (si ce n’est pas la majorité) des contrats représentent un très faible nombre d’heures (allez voir sur jobs.ac.uk, le sité spécialisé dans les emplois universitaires au Royaume-Uni, et vous verrez tous les temps partiels de 10% qu’on vous propose). Cela signifie que ces gens acceptent en fait de payer pour avoir le privilège d’être employé par une université, puisqu’ils savent bien que faire un trou dans leur CV est un risque trop élevé à prendre, et qu’ils devraient accepter n’importe quelle offre d’emploi. La compétition n’a jamais été si rude : des centaines de CV affluent pour un seul poste ouvert, ce qui amènent les gens à être constamment en compétition envers leurs pairs et eux-mêmes. Ils ne peuvent pas déménager, puisqu’ils ne savent pas pendant combien de temps ils travailleront à un endroit précis. Quand ils commencent à travailler pour une fac, parce que le contrat est à durée déterminée, ils n’ont pas encore préparé leurs cours de l’année qu’il leur faut commencer à postuler pour après. Leurs relations (amicales, familiales, amoureuses) sont totalement détruites par cette instabilité, devenue courante, dans laquelle ils sont obligés de vivre. Dans aucun autre secteur on n’est amené.e.s à postuler avec une si large ouverture géographique en raison du peu de poste disponibles sur le marché du travail. Dans aucun autre secteur l’employé.e ne paye de sa poche des sommes astronomiques pour assister à des colloques qui lui sont intellectuellement et professionnellement nécessaires. Et les conditions de travail favorables veulent généralement dire, ahem, qu’ils/elles peuvent choisir où et quand travailler. Mais par où et quand, ce qu’on veut dire, c’est en fait : dans leur bureau quand ils/elles ont la chance d’en avoir un ou d’en partager un, et tout le temps bien sûr, car l’équilibre vie personnelle-vie professionnelle n’a jamais été une utopie aussi remarquable dans le monde universitaire.

Le paragraphe ci-dessus vous aura je l’espère rassuré.e : ce n’est pas parce que vous travaillez dans le monde universitaire que vous devriez vous sentir reconnaissant.e envers les personnes qui vous exploitent, et qui comptent étirer vos heures de travail et alourdir votre charge de travail jusqu’à ce que vous vous effondriez.

Je vis avec des TOC et des épisodes de depression, et bien que le monde universitaire n’ait pas créé ces troubles, elle leur a en tout cas permis de s’épanouir tout-à-fait. Ce système pourrait avoir la même influence négative sur des troubles tels que (liste non-exhaustive) : l’anxiété, les dépendances, les phases maniaques, la paranoïa, les phobies, les troubles bipolaires, le manque d’estime de soi, les scarifications et autre punitions auto-imposées, l’extrême fatigue, les problèmes de sommeil, les troubles alimentaires et les pensées suicidaires. Cela s’applique aux employé.e.s comme aux étudiant.e.s. Et il nous faut urgemment nous pencher sur ce problème.

Pour les étudiant.e.s, les pressions financières de plus en plus lourdes les mettent dans une position où ils/elles n’ont plus droit à l’erreur. C’est tout simplement inabordable. Ce qui est un problème, voyez-vous, car l’échec fait partie de tout programme d’éducation. Non pas parce que certain.e.s devraient échouer, mais parce que si ça arrive, ça ne devrait pas être un problème. C’est pourquoi on peut en théorie aller au rattrapage, refaire une année, etc. Mais comment les étudiant.e.s pourraient-ils/elles même envisager ça, quand le simple fait de passer un diplôme les laissera de toute façon endetté.e.s pour au moins dix ans ? Avez-vous dejà demandé à une personne anxieuse comment elle se sentait, face à ce genre de pression ? Quand elle a peur des remboursements avant même d’avoir dépensé l’argent dont on lui a fait crédit ?

Les étudiant.e.s de master et de doctorat se voient généralement imposer une charge d’enseignement ainsi qu’une charge administrative. C’est important, car cette expérience est supposée les aider à trouver un travail par la suite. Mais en plus d’une charge d’enseignement de plus en plus lourde, due au budget resserré des universités, on leur rappelle constamment que leur priorité doit être de publier leur recherche. Il leur faut publier. « Publish or perish », comme on dit en anglais, publie ou péris, mais franchement ça n’est même plus un choix : publie, c’est tout. Il est maintenant bien connu que personne ne trouve de travail sans avoir au minimum ce qu’avant, on aurait attendu de publications d’un.e enseignant.e-chercheur.se avec dix ans d’expérience.

Pour le personnel d’enseignement, la pression qu’on lui met est devenu si ridicule que des fois je me demande, horrifiée, si l’on n’est pas en fait dans une télé-réalité qui s’intéresse à : combien d’heures un.e enseignant.e peut-il tenir avec si peu de sommeil avant de se transformer en zombie… Honnêtement. Encore une fois, contrairement à ce que voudrait nous faire croire l’imagerie populaire, la vie d’un.e. enseignant.e ou non chercheur.se est infiniment remplie : on exige qu’ils/elles fassent toujours plus, et plus encore ; pourtant, tout au long de mon expérience parmi elles et eux et au-delà, je n’ai jamais vu qu’on leur enlevait du coup des épaules une charge correspondante. Ça ne fonctionne que dans ce sens-là : plus, plus, plus. Voici les exigences : ramener plus d’argent (oui, on commence par ça) grâce à des demandes de subventions et de partenariats, enseigner plus d’heures, être soi-même noté.e plus souvent et par plus de gens, faire plus d’heures de présence au bureau, davantage soutenir les étudiants, gérer des situations plus difficiles (certaines créées, justement, par le système même de l’Université aujourd’hui), être davantage présent.e sur place à la fac, écrire plus, noter plus de copies, écrire davantage de corrections, publier davantage d’articles et de livres, davantage promouvoir son institution, aller encore plus à la rencontre du grand public. Et gardons à l’esprit que n’importe qui arrive avec ce que j’appellerai un profil peu traditionnel pour ce monde universitaire a des chances de travailler jusqu’à dix fois plus pour prouver (avant tout à eux.elles-mêmes) qu’ils/elles ne sont pas des imposteurs.

C’est marrant comme des phrases type “équilibre vie personnelle-vie professionnelle » sont devenues à la mode dans les milieux du travail hypocrites de notre époque. Comprenez-moi bien : l’équilibre vie personnelle-vie professionnelle n’est pas une expression vide de sens, elle est même capitale. Mais faire croire à ses employé.e.s qu’on s’inquiète pour leur santé en les invitant à une après-midi autour de la question « équilibre vie personnelle-vie professionnelle », c’est un échec du point de vue moral comme du point de vue logique. Accordez-leur plutôt un après-midi de congé. C’est ça dont ils/elles ont vraiment besoin. Mais même dans ce cas-là, il y a fort à parier qu’ils/elles s’enfermeraient au bureau pour finir cet article qui a déjà deux semaines de retard. Parce que les universitaires sont toujours en retard sur leur planning. Et s’ils.elles ne le sont pas, on s’avisera de le leur faire ressentir comme tel : qu’est-ce qu’ils.elles ne font pas qui leur permette d’avoir du temps libre ? Il y a toujours quelque chose d’autre à faire, dans un environnement défini par une absence de frontières entre vie personnelle et vie professionnelle.

Choisir une carrière universitaire, c’est choisir une vie entièrement définie par les deadlines. Une vie où on ne peut jamais vraiment penser : ok, là, c’est bon pour aujourd’hui/pour la semaine /pour le mois. On y vit avec le sentiment constant qu’on devrait être encore en train de travailler. On y pense dans son lit, on y pense les week-ends. Les vacances ? Hahaha. Laissons tomber. Vous voulez dire ce moment de l’année où les universitaires répondent à leurs emails à 6h du matin depuis leur chambre d’hôtel, avant de se rendre, rongés par la culpabilité, à la plage ?

Évidemment qu’il y a des gens qui évoluent dans le monde universitaire et qui ne bossent pas des masses. Je vais même vous dire qui ils sont. Ils n’en auraient pas même honte, ils en sont plutôt fiers : ce sont les gens qui pensent que le fait qu’ils soient là n’est que justice. Des gens qui n’ont jamais imaginé, pas même une fois dans leur vie, qu’ils auraient à travailler pour en arriver là. C’était une évidence de départ. Généralement due à des facteurs pour lesquels ils n’ont aucun mérite (être né dans ma bonne classe sociale, dans un pays suffisamment riche, est d’une aide précieuse).

Et voilà pourquoi c’est un pari risqué. Bien sûr, ces gens dont la présence ne semble que justice ont pu me dire, et ont dit aux autres : « non mais t’inquiète pas. » Parce que, en effet, ils ne s’inquiètent jamais. Mais imaginez être une personne anxieuse dès le depart. Et voir que chacune de vos actions, comme de vos non actions, est évaluée par vos chefs, vos pairs, les gens qui vous financent. Imaginez quand chaque article que vous écrivez, pour être bien noté lors de l’évaluation nationale du REF (Research Excellence Framework), évaluation qui compte autant pour votre sécurité de l’emploi que pour entretenir de bonnes relations de travail, doit être perçu comme étant de qualité exceptionnelle, au sein d’un journal lui-même exceptionnel, à un moment particulièrement exceptionnel, tenez. Imaginez qu’on vous demande constamment : « d’accord, et donc, qu’est-ce qui pourrait mal se passer pendant ce cours ? », qu’on vous demande d’analyser vos échecs avant même que vous ayez échoué : imaginez une personne ayant déjà une propension à la paranoïa ou aux phobies remplir dossier après dossier d’évaluation des risques, entendre qu’elle doit adapter son cours de 50 minutes à 14 manières profil d’apprenants différents, et changer d’activité toutes les cinq minutes pour conserver l’attention de tous.tes. Maintenant, imaginez que vous faites tout ceci alors que vous avez des TOC, une maladie qui est de toute façon une maladie de la répétition, encore et encore, une maladie qui vous convainc que vous ne pourrez jamais rien faire comme il faut. Imaginez la personne anxieuse se réveiller la nuit en pensant : « et si cet.te étudiant.e faisait appel de la note que je lui ai donné.e ? » Imaginez vivre avec une dépression et un manque d’estime de soi et penser : « qui suis-je pour les juger, de toute façon ? » en corrigeant des copies. Et imaginez ne jamais bénéficier d’une vraie longue pause, pause que tout le monde mérite. Un moment enfin où rien d’extrêmement important n’ait besoin d’être mis « sur pause ». Un moment où l’esprit puisse véritablement se reposer, puisqu’il est si constamment sollicité tout le reste de l’année.

Je me suis complètement noyée. Vraiment. Pas juste à cause de ça mais oui, en partie à cause de ça. Ça n’était jamais assez. Même lorsque j’étais soutenue par les gens les plus bienveillants, les plus humains et les plus compréhensifs, je n’arrivais pas à me considérer comme autre chose qu’une looseuse. Parce que j’ai eu la chance de recevoir un soutien formidable, le moins que je puisse faire à présent, c’est de dire ce que les gens de ce milieu n’osent pas dire. Je connais l’histoire. Pendant qu’on est prof à l’université, on ne veut surtout pas qu’on nous entende douter de nous-même, ou désirer une pause. On se dit que tout le monde pensera qu’on n’est pas taillé.e pour ça. On a peur qu’on ne nous donne plus jamais de responsabilités et de promotion, si l’on en parle. On pense qu’on perdrait toute crédibilité envers ses collègues et ses étudiant.e.s si on laissait pour un instant nos exigences se relâcher un peu, voire, quelle horreur, si on publiait un article vraiment pas terrible. Qu’est-ce qui se passerait lors de notre prochaine demande de financement ? Personnellement, je n’en ai plus rien à cirer, de tout ça. Je n’ai rien à perdre, j’ai tout à gagner. Chaque personne qui se rend compte qu’elle n’est pas seule là-dedans, c’est une victoire. Chaque personne qui se met à penser : « attends deux minutes… est-ce qu’on pourrait pas changer quelque chose, là ? », c’est une victoire.

Ne perdez pas de vue que la plupart des maître.sse.s de conférence et enseignant.e.s le deviennent précisément parce qu’ils considèrent l’influence qu’ils ont sur les étudiant.e.s comme une priorité. Quelqu’un qui s’en fout de toute façon, ne s’en foutra pas moins car vous lui mettrez la pression ; ce quelqu’un s’en fout, c’est tout. Mais qui qui ne s’en fout pas, depuis le premier jour, ne mérite pas de se sentir pareillement oppressé.e. Il/elle accumulera de toute façon les choses à faire, les rapports à rédiger, les tâches à accomplir jusqu’à un jour s’écrouler. Cet écroulement peut n’arriver qu’à la retraite, sous la forme de regrets lancinants, cas tous les gens ne vivent pas un burn-out.

Laissez-moi donc m’adresser ici aux gens qui décident du destin des universités, des étudiant.e.s et des universitaires : ne perdez pas vos meilleurs éléments, vos éléments les plus dévoués et les plus sympathiques, parce que vous vous ne percevez pas qu’ils/elles ont atteint leurs limites. Et surtout, ne faites pas semblant de ne pas le voir. Nous en sommes tous et toutes témoins.

Trop d’ami.e.s risquent de se perdre par épuisement. Je vous en tiendrai directement pour responsables.

Top

0

Being Your Own Doctor: the NHS and Its Contradictions

french flag pastel

Everywhere I read and am told that I should be the one identifying patterns to protect my mental health. Helped by several therapists, I have now identified a few patterns. I know for a fact that when I become increasingly tired, even though I’m not doing anything exhausting, and that it feels impossible to catch up on my sleep, there’s a high risk I might become overwhelmed by a depressive episode, filled with many more compulsions.

The problem is this: they tell you to identify patterns, but when you do, doctors may actually not give a shit. I’m sorry for all those who do (and they exist, I know), but honestly, my recent medical appointments have been absolutely useless, to say the least.

A few weeks ago, I was getting rather worried: even walking from work had become too demanding, I would just sit and wait for the bus – which is very unlike me. So trying to be responsible, I made an appointment with the doctor. I explained the extreme tiredness, the waking up with nightmares every night, the exhaustion worsening in the mornings, the shaking, the putting-on weight, the not really caring about things any more … and I said that honestly, I was concerned. I don’t like to go to the doctor, like most of us. If I’m there, facing what I know is often a bit of: ‘nah, you’re fine, don’t worry, just go home and wait for it to go away’, it’s because I know there’s a risk of a severe episode. So they told me: we’re going to do a blood test. I said ‘yes please’, because I know they want to get that reassurance first. I was very upfront about being on an almost vegan diet for three years now – so we could straight away check for any deficiencies. The tested me for iron, vitamin B12, among other things.

Today I got the results. And they’re all good. And the doctor couldn’t understand that I wasn’t jumping through the roof with excitement, apparently.
– So yeah, all good! That’s great!
– Okay… But… You see, I’m still concerned about… depressive mood… and my OCD seems to be worsening a lot when I feel that exhausted, I have to concentrate so much more.
– Nah, you’re still on Fluoxetine, aren’t you?
– Yes, the highest dose, yes.
– That’s okay then.
– ???
– That means your tiredness isn’t medical.
– ???
– There isn’t something medically wrong with you, you see: blood tests are fine and you’re on medication.
– Okay… now… I’m really sorry but you see… I’ve been asked to keep an eye on patterns like this one and I’m very anxious at the minute…
– Well you just need to rest then.
– But… That’s my problem, like I said… I sleep 12 hours straight sometimes, these days, and I don’t feel rested… And I feel really guilty for it.
– No really, that’s okay. That’s great news! Your blood results are all good. Don’t worry.
– Err… okay then.
– Okay bye bye, then!
– … bye… I… I guess?


Just to be clear: I’m not putting this up to call for help. I’m okay, honestly. But I would like other people living with mental illness to know that they’re not alone in being dismissed, even with a history of serious breakdowns. We struggle just to get heard. As long as we’re still functioning (in a very socio-economic way, that is, as it’s all that seems to matter – work and be a social animal), then we’re not a health concern to the NHS. The problem is that we put all our energy, all we have left, into functioning so that nobody notices.

I just wish that instead of running hypocritical campaigns about wellbeing and mindfulness, when you actually went to a doctor, and said, with shame all over your face and your eyes down on your shoes: ‘I know I may seem fine as in… bodily… but… I’m… I’m struggling… I can feel it…’ they wouldn’t just ignore you.

I would like to feel quite angry right now, but you know what? I feel too tired for that. So I’ll just leave it at that. Thank god the fight is worth it, because it’s quite draining. It is worth it, though. It is.


Être son propre docteur: la NHS et ses contradictions

Note: La NHS est l’équivalent au Royaume-Uni de la Sécurité Sociale française.


Partout, je lis et j’entends que je dois être celle qui identifie mes propres variations en termes de santé pour protéger mon équilibre psychique. Aidée de plusieurs thérapeutes, j’ai maintenant réussi à identifier certains schémas. Je sais par exemple que lorsque je suis de plus en plus fatiguée, même en ne faisant pourtant rien d’épuisant, et que je me sens de plus en plus incapable de rattraper mon sommeil, il y a un risque élevé que je me retrouve engloutie par un épisode dépressif, associé à un regain de compulsions.


Le problème, c’est qu’on nous dit d’identifier nos schémas, mais quand on le fait, les docteurs s’en battent parfois complètement le steak. Je suis désolée pour ceux qui en ont vraiment quelque chose à foutre (et bien sûr qu’ils existent) mais honnêtement, mes derniers rendez-vous médicaux ont été complètement inutiles, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire.

Il y a quelques semaines, je m’inquiétais : même rentrer du travail était devenu trop difficile, je m’asseyais et j’attendais le bus (ce qui ne me ressemble vraiment pas). Pour agir de façon responsable, j’ai pris rendez-vous chez le docteur. J’ai expliqué la fatigue extrême, les réveils en pleine nuit au milieu de cauchemars, l’épuisement pire le matin, les tremblements, la prise de poids, le fait que je commençais à me foutre un peu des choses, au fond… et j’ai admis qu’honnêtement, je m’inquiétais. Je n’aime pas aller chez le docteur, comme la plupart d’entre nous. Si je suis là, à faire face à ce que je sais être un récurrent potentiel de « naaaan, ça va, ne vous inquiétez pas, rentrez chez vous et attendez que ça passe », c’est que je pense qu’il a un réel risque d’épisode moins bien. Bref, le docteur a dit : on va faire une prise de sang. J’ai dit « oui, merci », parce que je sais qu’ils cherchent d’abord à rassurer de ce côté-là. J’ai donc dit d’emblée au médecin que ça faisait quasi trois ans que je mangeais végétalien, pour qu’on puisse vérifier sans tarder de potentielles carences. Il a opté entre autres pour des tests de fer et de vitamines B12.

Aujourd’hui, j’ai eu les résultats. Et ils sont tous bons. Et la doctoresse [en Angleterre on change très souvent de docteur, car on prend celui qui a de la place] ne comprenait pas que je ne crève pas le plafond de joie, apparemment.
– Voilà, c’est tout bon ! C’est génial !
– Oui… Mais… Vous voyez, je suis toujours inquiète par rapport à cette… humeur dépressive… et mes TOC ont l’air d’empirer beaucoup quand je me sens si fatiguée, je dois me concentrer tellement plus.
– Nan, vous prenez bien de la Fluoxétine, c’est ça ?
– Oui, la dose maximale.
– C’est bon alors.
– ???
– Ça veut dire que votre fatigue n’est pas médicale.
– ???
– D’un point de vue médical, il n’y a rien qui ne va pas chez vous, vous voyez : les résultats de la prise de sang sont bons et vous prenez des médicaments.
– Oui… mais… euh… je suis vraiment désolée… On m’a dit de bien faire attention aux schémas comme celui-là et je suis très anxieuse, actuellement…
– Il faut vous reposer.
– Mais… c’est ça mon problème, comme je vous disais… des fois je fais des nuits de 12 heures en ce moment et je ne me sens pas plus reposée… Et après je m’en veux beaucoup.
– Nan, ne vous inquiétez pas. C’est une très bonne nouvelle! Vos résultats sanguins sont bons.
– Euh… d’accord…
– Voilà, alors au revoir !
– Euh… au revoir.. .?


Pour être bien claire: je ne publie pas ce billet pour appeler à l’aide. Honnêtement, ça va. Mais je voulais que d’autres gens qui vivent avec des troubles psychologiques et/ou des angoisses sachent qu’ils ne sont pas les seuls à être ignorés, même en ayant un passif marqué de dépressions nerveuses. C’est encore difficile d’être écouté.e. Du moment qu’on fonctionne encore (dans un sens très socio-économique, puisqu’apparemment c’est le seul truc qui compte – travailler et être un animal social), alors nous ne sommes pas perçus comme à risque par la NHS. Le souci, c’est qu’on met justement toute notre énergie, toute celle qui nous reste, à fonctionner normalement pour que personne ne remarque rien.

J’aimerais qu’au lieu de faire des campagnes publiques hypocrites sur le bien-être et la mindfulness, quand on se rende chez un docteur, et qu’on dise, la gueule pleine de honte et le regard sur les chaussures : « Je sais que j’ai l’air d’aller bien… je veux dire… au niveau du corps… mais… je… je galère en ce moment… je… je le sens. », on ne nous renvoie pas ce dédain.


J’aimerais me sentir très en colère là tout de suite, mais vous savez quoi ? Suis trop crevée pour ça. Alors je m’arrête ici. Heureusement que le combat en vaut la chandelle, parce qu’il est éreintant. Mais bien sûr qu’il en vaut la chandelle. Aucun doute là-dessus.

Top

0

Towards, Perhaps, A Better Understanding of Happiness

french flag pastel

For Ange.


We encourage such a cartoonish depiction of happiness. Don’t get me wrong. I did too. Even though I had no idea what it was – I was too busy wondering how to get there to actually define it – it was absolutely clear that it would involve: a quasi-constant smile, calm, serenity, the total absence of worry or pain.

I have none of these things. Yet, I can now say it with more certitude than ever: fuck yeah, I am happy.

For one thing, I’ve met people who helped me understand that happiness doesn’t always have to include a 24/7 blissful smile. I must confess, in my family we like it to be part of the package. So I didn’t know how to react when I would ask my partner how he felt, and all he answered was: ‘I’m alright.’ You can be sure that straight away, I’d target him with numerous questions: ‘what do you mean just alright? Are you too cold? Too hot? Is the food not good? Oh dear have I done something? Have I upset you? It’s what I said in that shop two weeks ago, isn’t it?’ The look of absolute disbelief on his face: ‘No, I’m fine! I told you, I’m alright. I swear.’

We have SO many different ways to express feelings. It sounds like a freaking cliché, but it’s worth repeating, since we constantly pressure others into complying with our own codes. I’m quite passionate, and always rather extreme. Okay let’s rephrase: honestly, I’m a passionate freak. When I’m happy, I’m quite literally jumping, laughing non-stop, smiling to strangers and finding the very fact that I exist a miracle worth screaming about. I see people being kind to each other and I want to cry with gratefulness. Well, to some people, that’s just too much. Yes it is. I mean, honestly, it probably is. It’s not a sign of wellbeing or happiness. It’s a sign that I should probably cut down on the Prozac, or that I’m faking it completely. But I’m not faking it, and I’ve been like this long before starting any anti-depressants. Equally, you can feel exactly as ecstatic as I do and not show it at all. I’m not saying it’s innate. Some of it surely is due to genes and that, but most of it I believe is environmental and due to the very development of your personality. I have lived in a very openly expressive family. We have a hard time hiding how we feel. Some people have gone through totally different social experiences, and to them, feeling fine is their best definition ever of ‘the world is awesome, I’m so happy to live!’

My friend Ange put it brilliantly: ‘You can only be as happy as your character allows. Something’s not wrong with you because you don’t jump around frantically. A simple, humble smile might be your way.’

Of course if you want to change that way because it feels uncomfortable or difficult to use with other people, feel free to work on it. You don’t have to, though.

It’s a cliché to talk about happiness clichés. Talk about a Catch-22… Yet allow me to join the conversation once more and say it: to hell with all of that, let’s stop policing what it means, and should look like, to feel good. Yes, some of us may need adjusting a little, or a lot. Because at the end of the day, you still want to be able to communicate with the people that matter most. You still want to be understood and respected in all your dimensions. But honestly, outside that circle, who cares? Discuss with your partner, lover, friends and family to honestly describe how you feel and why it may not look like a cover of the magazine Marie-Claire, and if they care – and if you’re not being an asshole about it, I mean, come on – then of course they’ll be okay with how you act and what sort of words you use.

I come from a place where happiness lives on the skin, floats on the crest of words. Some people are as happy as me, and they don’t smile anywhere near half of the time. They don’t have a problem. Neither do I – on that front, I mean.

I don’t know how to define happiness, because once in my life I could have checked pretty much all boxes and still felt shitty as hell. I don’t know how to define happiness, but I know I’m living it right now. And let me tell you: I’m still prone to severe depressive episodes, still struggle with OCD on a daily basis, still bleed internally from grief knowing that some people I loved most will never make it back to earth, and that I will one day no longer be. My body is a permanent existential crisis locus, and yet I’m happy, I know I am, because I want to stay, I would beg anyone and anything to have more time and love to give, take, and steal.

I’m not calm, and I’ve tried mindfulness believe me, I’m not at all serene or “at peace”, my brain is a gigantic self-recreating mess and I feel anger, sadness, despair as much as I feel unfathomable gratefulness, joy and optimism, almost every day. Let’s forget about the box-ticking and the simplifying body-language stereotypes.

Learn to express your own happiness (and equally, sadness) so that people who care can get you, and you can get them. Once upon a time I strongly believed that any silence betrayed discomfort, pain or being bored. I exhausted myself filling in all the gaps when other people were around me. Since I have allowed silence to be part of my communication style, as I’ve wanted it to be all along, I’ve never felt so able to connect with others.

Let’s care about how people feel instead of policing their behaviours, moves and facial expressions. And let’s give us all a break: it’s also okay, not to feel happy. Honestly, you don’t have to in order to have a life worth living. You may never feel as happy as you think you should or could have. It doesn’t even mean you weren’t.


As the great Whitney Houston once sung it: “I wish you joy and happiness, but above all this I wish you: love”. Whitney, if you hear us: thank you.


C’est quoi être heureux ? Tentative d’indéfinition

À Ange

On soutient une définition tellement caricaturale de ce sentiment: être heureux. Comprenez-moi, bien, je l’ai soutenue moi-même. Bien que je n’avais aucune idée de ce que cela voulait dire (j’étais bien trop occupée à savoir comment y parvenir pour m’interroger sur ce que c’était vraiment), il était clair que cela impliquait : un sourire quasi-constant, du calme, de la sérénité, l’absence totale d’inquiétude ou de douleur.

Je n’ai rien de tout ça. Pourtant, je peux dire avec plus de certitude que je n’en ai jamais eue : bordel oui, je suis heureuse.

D’abord car j’ai rencontré des gens qui m’ont permis de comprendre qu’être heureuse, ça n’incluait pas forcément un sourire béat H-24. Je l’avoue, dans ma famille on aime que le sourire fasse partie du lot. Alors je ne savais pas comment réagir quand je demandais à mon copain comment il allait, et qu’il me répondait : « ça va. » Vous pouvez être sûr que tout de suite après, j’enchaînais les questions du style : « juste ‘ça va’ ? T’as froid ? T’as chaud ? La bouffe est pas bonne? Oh bon dieu j’ai fait quelque chose? Je t’ai vexé? C’est ce que j’ai dit dans ce magasin il y a deux semaines, c’est ça? » Son air d’incompréhension absolue: “Non non, ça va! Je te dis, ça va bien. Je te promets.”

On a des manières tellement différentes d’exprimer ce qu’on ressent. C’est vraiment un poncif, mais il faut le répéter, puisqu’on fout la pression à tout le monde pour qu’ils se soumettent à nos propres codes. Je suis plutôt passionnée, et généralement assez extrême. Bon d’accord je reformule : honnêtement, je suis une cinglée de l’enthousiasme. Quand je suis heureuse, je saute quasi littéralement de partout, je rigole sans arrêt, je souris aux inconnus et je trouve que le simple fait que je vive est un miracle suffisant pour le gueuler. Je vois des gens être gentils entre eux et j’ai envie d’en pleurer de gratitude. Bon, pour certains, ça fait un peu beaucoup. Oui, c’est beaucoup. Je veux dire, sincèrement, c’est sûrement trop. Ce n’est pas un signe d’équilibre ou de bonheur. C’est un signe que je devrais probablement diminuer ma dose de Prozac, ou que je simule complet. Pourtant, je ne simule pas, et j’étais comme ça bien avant de prendre des anti-dépresseurs. De même, il est possible que vous vous sentiez aussi extatique que moi et ne le montriez pas du tout. Je ne dis pas que c’est inné. C’est sûrement en partie lié aux gènes et tout ça, mais je pense que l’essentiel vient de notre environnement et du développement de notre personnalité. J’ai vécu dans une famille très ouvertement expressive. On a du mal à cacher ce qu’on ressent. Certains ont vécu des expériences sociales totalement différentes, et pour eux, s’en tenir à se sentir pas trop mal est la meilleure définition qu’ils ont de: “la vie est formidable, je suis trop heureux d’être là ! »

Une amie, Ange, l’a brillamment formulé : « on ne peut qu’être aussi heureux que le permet notre caractère. Ce n’est pas parce qu’on ne saute pas constamment au plafond qu’on a un problème. Un sourire simple, discret, peut être notre façon de l’exprimer. »

Bien sûr, si vous désirez changer ça parce que ça vous met mal à l’aise, ou que ça rend les relations aux autres difficiles, vous pouvez travailler dessus. Mais ce n’est pas une obligation.

C’est un cliché de parler des clichés du bonheur. Tu parles d’un cercle vicieux… Pourtant, permettez-moi de rejoindre la conversation et de le dire : on s’en fout de tout ça, arrêtons de vouloir surveiller ce que ça veut dire, ce à quoi ça doit ressembler, de se sentir bien. Certes, une partie d’entre nous peut avoir besoin de s’adapter quelque peu, ou beaucoup. Parce qu’au bout du bout, ce qui compte c’est d’être en mesure de communiquer avec les gens qui comptent le plus pour nous. On veut être compris et respectés dans toutes nos dimensions. Mais honnêtement, sortis de ce cercle-là, qu’est-ce qu’on en a à secouer ? Parlez avec votre partenaire, votre amant, vos amis, votre famille, et dites-leur honnêtement comment vous vous sentez et pourquoi ça ne ressemble pas à une couverture de Marie-Claire, et s’ils vous aiment (et que vous ne vous comportez pas comme un enfoiré, n’abusons pas), alors bien sûr que votre manière de vous comporter et de parler leur conviendra.

Je viens d’un endroit où le bonheur se vit sur la peau, flotte sur la crête des mots. Certains sont aussi heureux que moi, et pourtant ne sourient pas la moitié de ce temps-là. Ce n’est pas qu’ils ont un souci. Et moi non plus. Enfin, là-dessus, je veux dire…

Je ne sais pas définir le bonheur, parce qu’il m’est arrivé dans ma vie de pouvoir cocher quasi toutes les cases qu’on pense nécessaires, et je me sentais au trente-sixième dessous quand même. Je ne sais pas définir « être heureuse », mais ce que je sais c’est que je le vis actuellement. Et laissez-moi vous dire ça : je suis toujours sujette à de sévères épisodes dépressifs, je me bats avec mes TOC quotidiennement, je saigne de l’intérieur du chagrin de savoir que des gens que j’aimais le plus au monde ne pourront jamais retrouver leur chemin jusqu’à nous, et qu’un jour moi non plus je ne serai plus. Mon corps est un lieu de crise existentielle permanente, et pourtant je suis heureuse, je sais que je le suis, parce que je veux y rester, je supplierai n’importe qui, n’importe quoi, de me laisser encore du temps et de l’amour à donner, à prendre, à voler.

Je ne suis pas calme, et j’ai essayé la mindfulness, je ne suis ni sereine ni « en paix avec moi-même », mon cerveau est un incessant bazar géant, et je ressens de la colère, de la tristesse, du désespoir, autant que je ressens une reconnaissance indescriptible, de la joie et de l’optimisme, tout ça quasiment tous les jours. Oublions les soi-disants critères et autres expressions corporelles stéréotypées.

Apprenez à exprimer votre propre bonheur (et aussi votre tristesse) pour que les gens autour de vous vous comprennent, et que vous les compreniez en retour. Il fut un temps où je pensais dur comme fer que tout silence trahissait de l’embarras, de la douleur ou de l’ennui. Je me suis épuisée à remplir tous ces trous quand j’avais des gens autour de moi. Depuis que j’ai permis au silence de faire partie de mon mode d’expression, comme je l’ai toujours souhaité, je ne me suis jamais sentie si reliée aux autres.

Préoccupons-nous davantage de comment les gens se sentent plutôt que de comment ils se comportent, bougent ou changent leurs expressions du visage. Et aussi, offrons-nous une pause : ca n’est pas forcément grave, ne pas être se sentir heureux. Honnêtement, on n’a pas besoin de ça pour avoir une vie qui vaut d’être vécue. Car peut-être qu’on ne se sentira jamais aussi heureux qu’on le « devrait » ou qu’on le voudrait. Ça ne veut même pas forcément dire qu’on ne l’est pas.
Comme la grande Whitney Houston l’a chanté: “Je te souhaite joie et bonheur, mais surtout, je te souhaite l’amour.” (“I wish you joy and happiness, but above all this I wish you: love”) Whitney, si tu nous entends : merci.

Top