Mistaking decisions for luck

french flag pastel

How many times have I witnessed this?

One or more of your friends are getting ready for a big trip, most likely to a different continent, most likely on their own. They’ve earned for months, sometimes years. They’ve quit their jobs, left the relative stability that comes with a permanent contract. They’ve done extra hours here and there to make it happen. They’ve looked into travel insurance, visa, passport requirements, etc. They’re about to embark on the trip of their lives. They’re happy, excited and scared. They’ve been thinking about it for so long… And then, someone – who probably has the best intentions – comes along, only to say: ‘oh, you’re so lucky!’


I’ve never understood such a statement in that context: ‘You’re so lucky.’

No they’re not. They’re brave, adventurous and they know what they want, that’s what it is. Luck has nothing to do with it.
Sure, some people are luckier than others. Obviously one’s lucky to be able to decide where to go. One can be lucky not to have visa restriction due to geo-politic bullshit. To be healthy enough to not require daily assisted medication. What strikes me, however, is that most of the time, the people saying: ‘you’re lucky’ are just as lucky as the person they’re talking to.

They’re as privileged as them. And by privileged, I mean that they have some of the following characteristics: being white, male, non-disabled, born in a unified country, never having experienced war, or extreme poverty, or daily violence.

I’m one of them. I am lucky. And that’s a very different sort of luck. It’s something I haven’t done anything for, ever. I’ve arrived to the world white, non-disabled and from a Western European country. That’s all it took. Being born there and then.

People talk about luck because that’s reassuring. If I think that someone is having a great life out of luck, I can’t blame myself: there’s absolutely nothing I can do.

When I’m tempted to call someone lucky, I always ask myself: what do you call luck, here? Is it really luck? It can be, when no other factors could have determined it. But if there’s any factor the person has influenced by decision-making, then it’s not luck…

Telling someone who has made many efforts to do something ‘wow, you’re lucky’, it’s a bit like telling them: ‘yeah, in the end, what you do is easy in your position.’ But if that’s so easy, and so desirable, why don’t we all do it, if we are indeed in the same position?

Saying to someone ‘you’re lucky’ really means: I wish I could live like you do.

I can’t quite get something however. You’re saying to your friend who’s getting ready to live in South America for years: ’you’re lucky’. Well, if you think that leaving your job and career stability, saying goodbye to all the people you love and you’re going to miss is luck, then why don’t you do it too?

It can apply to a lot of things.

You’re a teacher – and of course, you’re ALWAYS on holiday. Oh, you’re so lucky.

Well, if you think that having a difficult work-life balance, having to work on weekends and in your tent during the summer, having to pass an extremely difficult and/or long test or degree, dealing with each individual with infinite patience and respect, is luck, then please, by all means, become a teacher.

You work in academia. Or in a powerful company, as an engineer. Or in any high social position in society, whatever the job. You’re so lucky.

Well, if you think luck means not going out for years to study for exams, doing internships where you’re hardly being paid, going from part-time contracts to one-month contracts for years, feeling the constant pressure of million-dollars contracts and objectives, then please be my guest.

Yes, some people are more privileged than others. For instance, the fact that I’m a white girl coming from France made a lot of things really easy for me. I could live in the UK without worrying about pretty much anything. No frequent control by the police, no visa requirement, and positive reactions from most people I’ve met. I wasn’t there to steal their jobs. To them, I was the nice French girl who wanted to go to the pub.

I know many people who’ve made decisions, that others sometimes mistake for luck. To me, they’re just brave people. And not only brave. They’re smart too: they know what they want, so they try to make it happen.

My young brother decided a long time ago he didn’t want to spend his whole life at the workplace, so from the earliest age, he decided that he would work, but not too much. When came the day he had to choose his University degree, he went for one that allowed him to have the time he needed for his hobbies: meeting friends, playing video games, doing sport activities. Because he’s a very clever man, many encouraged him to go for a tougher, higher degree. He would earn more, and get to a manager position. But my brother didn’t want to sacrifice his life for work. He didn’t. And today he’s this incredibly healthy and kind man. Most important of all: he feels good.

Is he lucky? No, he chose wisely.

My older brother didn’t want to go to Uni straight away. He needed to have other experiences before. So he did. He worked for several companies. Not always in relaxing jobs, and some years have been harder than others. Then one day, he decided to go to Uni. It was important for him on many levels, and since I can’t speak for himself I’ll just leave it there… The thing is though, he succeeded. People were really impressed, of course, and he’s felt a real sense of satisfaction and achievement having done this. Although this implied many sacrifices, the first being: attending classes with 20-year old students when society expects you to be all settled down by now. Having a degree never only requires motivation and intelligence, both qualities he had. It may require, here for instance, to go against certain social norms.

Is he lucky? No, he made the decision to go back to school, a decision many wouldn’t make.

Some of my friends have amazing jobs. Or jobs where they earn a lot. Or jobs where they’re basically paid to read and write. Some of my friends/people I know truly have money.

Are they lucky? No. Every day, what they have is the result of all the decisions they’ve made over the years, and that other people didn’t want to make.

Some of my friends travel the world. They meet people from all over the planet. They speak two, three, sometimes five languages. They’ve seen places which never appeared in any movie.

Are they lucky? No, there was always this one day when they chose the unknown rather than the comfortable familiar.

Some of my friends didn’t want to feel submissive. They’ve changed jobs many times, because the concept of hierarchy is not an easy one for them, because there are limits to what they can tolerate from a manager. They’ve ended up with incredible experience, they’ve seen loads of things, and they’re confident in their own value.

Are they lucky? No, they just have clear limits. They admit that having them doesn’t make life easy, and they don’t go for an easy one anyway: they go for a life that suits them.

Some of my friends have great, loving, fun and open-minded partners or lovers. They’ve done what it takes to be with someone as nice as them: they knew how to apologise when they were wrong, they learnt how to make their partner happy, they were willing to compromise.

Are they lucky? No, they don’t own anyone. Their partner or lover can leave any day. If they stay, it’s because they have reasons to stay. – good reasons, I hope, and I think so.

Choosing wisely doesn’t mean making pragmatic choices. If what makes you happy is to never know where to sleep next, that’s okay. Likewise, in order to make decisions, you don’t need to make huge-scale decisions. Deciding of your life doesn’t mean taking a flight to Japan tomorrow for ten years. Maybe it means leaving next to your parents’ house, where you’ve grown up, so that they’ll have time to see their grandkids.

I can’t not repeat it again, because life’s unfair in itself. Some people are luckier than others. That’s a fact. But even then, people still make decisions.

What matter are the decisions you make, and why.

I don’t like to say: ‘you’re lucky.’ I say: ‘wow. Well done. Congrats. I’m really happy for you if you’re happy this way’. Because to win the lottery, I’d have to start buying scratchcards. If I don’t, I won’t feel unlucky when the name of the winner will appear on the television screen. Maybe I’ll want to buy tickets then, but that just how decision-making works…

Oh and because I’d love to buy a flat in New York, to read all in day in Brooklyn, Manhattan, and in a cliché.


Confondre décisions et chance

Combien de fois ai-je été témoin de ça ?

Un – ou plusieurs – amis s’apprête à partir pour un grand voyage, probablement sur un autre continent, probablement tout seul. Il ou elle a économisé pendant des mois, parfois des années. Il ou elle a quitté son travail, laissé la relative stabilité qu’accompagne un CDI. Il ou elle a fait des heures sup’ ici et là pour permettre aux choses de se faire. Il ou elle s’est renseigné(e) sur les assurances voyages, les visas, les règles en matière de passeports, etc. Il ou elle est sur le point de démarrer le voyage de sa vie. Il ou elle ressent de la joie, de l’impatience, de la peur. Il ou elle y a pensé pendant tellement longtemps… Et là, quelqu’un – pourtant sûrement bien intentionné – se ramène, et lui dit : « oh, comme t’as de la chance ! »


Je n’ai jamais compris ce genre de déclaration dans ce contexte : « t’as de la chance ! »


Non, ce n’est pas de la chance qui a mené cette personne ici. C’est son courage, son esprit aventureux, et le fait qu’elle sache ce qu’elle veut. La chance n’a rien à voir là-dedans.

Bien sûr, certains sont plus chanceux que d’autres. Evidemment que quelqu’un a de la chance de pouvoir décider où aller. Quelqu’un peut avoir la chance de ne pas avoir de restriction liée au visa en raison de conneries géo-politiques. La chance d’être suffisamment en bonne santé pour ne pas avoir besoin d’une aide médicale tous les jours. Ce qui me frappe, pourtant, c’est que la plupart du temps, les gens qui disent : « t’as de la chance » ont autant de chance que les gens à qui ils s’adressent.

Ils sont aussi privilégiés qu’eux. Et par privilégiés, j’entends qu’ils ont plusieurs des caractéristiques suivantes : être blanc, être un homme, ne pas être handicapé, être né dans un pays unifié, n’avoir jamais connu la guerre, ni l’extrême pauvreté, ni la violence quotidienne.

Je suis l’une d’entre eux. J’ai de la chance. Et ça, c’est une forme de chance bien différente. C’est une chose pour laquelle je n’ai jamais, jamais rien eu besoin de faire. Je suis venue au monde blanche, pas handicapée et dans un pays d’Europe occidentale. C’est tout ce que ça a nécessité. De naître là, et à ce moment-là.

Les gens parlent de chance parce que c’est rassurant. Si je me dis que quelqu’un vit une vie géniale par chance, je n’ai rien à me reprocher : il n’y a rien que je puisse y faire.

Quand je suis tentée de dire que quelqu’un a de la chance, je me pose toujours la question : qu’est-ce que tu appelles de la chance, ici ? Est-ce vraiment de la chance ? ça peut l’être, quand aucun autre facteur n’a été déterminant. Mais si un facteur a pu être influencé par le processus décisionnel de la personne, alors ça n’est pas de la chance…

Dire à quelqu’un qui a fait énormément d’efforts pour faire quelque chose : « whaou, t’as de la chance », c’est un peu comme leur dire : « ouais, finalement, ce que tu fais c’est facile quand on est à ta place ». Mais si c’est si facile que ça, et si attractif, pourquoi est-ce qu’on ne le fait pas tous, si on est de fait dans une position similaire ?

Dire à quelqu’un “t’as de la chance” signifie: j’aimerais vivre comme toi.

Il y a quelque chose que je ne comprends pas, cependant. On dit à un ami qui s’apprête à vivre en Amérique du Sud pendant des années : « t’as de la chance ». Mais si on pense que quitter son travail et la stabilité qui va avec, dire au revoir à tous les gens qu’on aime et qui vont nous manquer, ça n’est que de la chance, pourquoi on ne le fait pas tous ?

Ça peut s’appliquer à plein de choses.

Tu es professeur. Et bien sûr, tu es TOUJOURS en vacances. Oh, t’as tellement de la chance.

Okay. Alors si vous pensez qu’avoir une frontière floue entre travail et vie privée, devoir travailler les week-ends et sous votre tente l’été, devoir passer un concours ou un diplôme long et/ou difficile, devoir trouver pour chaque individu suffisamment de patience et de respect , c’est de la chance, alors je vous en prie, devenez professeur.

Tu travailles à la fac. Ou dans une entreprise puissante, où tu es ingénieur(e). Ou dans n’importe quelle haute position sociale, quel que soit le boulot. T’as tellement de la chance.

Okay. Alors si vous pensez qu’avoir de la chance, c’est ne pas sortir pendant des années pour reviser pour ses examens, faire des stages où on est à peine payé, aller de contrat à temps partiel en CDD d’un mois, ressentir constamment la pression de contrats et d’objectifs qui pèsent plusieurs millions d’euros, alors, je vous invite chaleureusement à faire la même chose.

Oui, certains ont plus de chance que d’autres. Par exemple, le fait que je sois une femme blanche, venant de France, a rendu bien des choses plus faciles pour moi. J’ai pu habiter au Royaume-Uni sans trop me soucier de quoi que ce soit. Pas de contrôles policiers fréquents, pas de nécessité de visa, et des réactions positives de la part de la plupart des gens que j’ai rencontrés. Pour eux, je n’étais pas là pour voler leur travail. Non, j’étais la gentille Française qui voulait aller au pub.

Je connais beaucoup de gens qui ont pris des décisions que d’autres prennent souvent pour de la chance. Pour moi, ce sont juste des gens courageux. Et pas seulement. Des gens intelligents, aussi, qui savent ce qu’ils veulent, et qui font ce qu’il faut pour y arriver.

Mon petit frère a décidé il y a longtemps déjà qu’il ne voulait pas passer sa vie sur son lieu de travail, alors, dès son plus jeune âge, il a décidé qu’il travaillerait, mais pas trop. Quand est venu le jour de choisir ses études supérieures, il a choisi une voie qui lui permettait d’avoir du temps pour ses différents loisirs : voir ses amis, jouer à des jeux vidéos, faire du sport. Parce que c’est un homme brillant, beaucoup l’ont encouragé à se lancer dans un diplôme plus exigeant, plus élevé : il gagnerait plus, et finirait dans une position de directeur. Mais mon frère ne voulait pas sacrifier sa vie pour son travail. Alors il ne l’a pas fait. Et aujourd’hui, mon jeune frère, c’est cet homme incroyablement équilibré et gentil. Et surtout : il se sent bien.

Est-ce qu’il a de la chance ? Non, il a choisi avec sagesse.

Mon grand frère n’a pas voulu aller à la fac directement. Il avait besoin de vivre d’autres expériences d’abord. Alors il les a vécues. Il a travaillé pour plusieurs entreprises. Pas toujours pour des boulots relaxants, et certaines années ont été plus dures que d’autres. Et puis un jour, il a décidé d’aller à la fac. C’était important pour lui à plusieurs niveaux, et comme je ne saurais parler en son nom, je n’en dirai pas davantage. Mais le fait est qu’il a réussi. Les gens ont été très impressionnés, bien sûr, et il a ressenti un vrai sentiment de satisfaction et d’accomplissement en faisant ça, même si cela a impliqué des sacrifices, le premier étant d’assister à des cours au milieu d’étudiants de 20 ans quand la société attend de toi que tu sois déjà installé dans la vie, à ton âge… Un diplôme ne demande jamais que de la motivation et de l’intelligence, deux qualités que mon frère avait déjà. Ça peut demander, comme ça l’a demandé dans ce cas par exemple, d’oser se confronter à certaines normes sociales.

Est-ce qu’il a de la chance ? Non, il a pris la décision de retourner à l’école, une décision que beaucoup ne prendraient pas.



Certains de mes amis ont des boulots géniaux. Ou des boulots où ils gagnent beaucoup d’argent. Ou des boulots où on les paie, grosso-modo, à lire et écrire. Certains de mes amis ont vraiment de gros moyens financiers.

Est-ce qu’ils ont de la chance ? Non. Tous les jours, ce qu’ils ont, c’est le résultat de toutes les décisions qu’ils ont prises au cours des années, et que d’autres n’auraient pas voulu prendre.

Certains de mes amis parcourent le monde. Ils rencontrent des gens venant de partout. Ils parlent deux, trois, parfois cinq langues. Ils ont vu de leur yeux des lieux qu’on n’a jamais vus dans aucun film.

Est-ce qu’ils ont de la chance ? Non. Il y a toujours eu ce jour où ils ont choisi l’inconnu, plutôt que le cadre familier rassurant.

Certains de mes amis ne voulaient pas se sentir soumis. Ils ont changé de boulot de nombreuses fois, parce que le concept de hiérarchie n’est pas facile à accepter pour eux, parce qu’il y a des limites à ce qu’ils peuvent tolérer de la part d’un supérieur. Ils ont fini par avoir une expérience immense, ils ont vu plein de choses différentes, et ils ont confiance en leur propre valeur.

Est-ce qu’ils ont de la chance ? Non, ils ont juste des limites claires. Ils admettent que ces limites ne leur rendent pas la vie plus simple. Ce qui tombe bien, car ça n’est pas une vie simple qu’ils recherchent, mais une vie qui leur conviennent.

Certains de mes amis sont avec des partenaires ou des amants géniaux, aimants, marrants et ouverts d’esprit. Ils ont fait ce qu’il fallait pour être avec des gens si chouettes : ils ont su s’excuser quand ils avaient tort, ils ont appris à rendre l’autre heureux, ils ont été prêts à faire des compromis.

Est-ce qu’ils ont de la chance ? Non. Ils ne possèdent définitivement personne. Leur partenaire ou amant peut s’en aller à tout moment. S’ils restent, c’est qu’ils ont des raisons de rester. De bonnes raisons, j’espère, mais je pense que oui.

Choisir avec sagesse ne signifie pas faire des choix pragmatiques. Si ce qui vous rend heureux c’est de ne pas savoir où vous dormirez la nuit prochaine, pas de souci. Dans le même ordre d’idée, prendre des décisions ne signifie pas prendre des décisions à l’échelle planétaire. Décider de votre vie ne veut pas dire prendre un avion pour le Japon demain, et y rester dix ans. Peut-être que pour vous, ça serait d’habiter à côté de la maison de vos parents, ou vous avez grandi, pour qu’ils voient grandir leurs petits-enfants.

Je ne peux pas ne pas le répéter, parce que la vie est injuste en elle-même. Certains ont plus de chance que d’autres. C’est un fait. Mais même dans ces cas-là, les gens prennent des décisions.

Ce qui compte, ce sont les décisions qu’on prend, et pour quelles raisons on les prend.

Je n’aime pas dire : « t’as de la chance ». Je dis : « Whaou. Bien joué. Félicitations. Je suis vraiment heureuse pour toi si ça te rend heureux. » Parce que pour gagner au loto, il faudrait déjà que j’achète un billet pour y jouer. Si je n’en achète pas, je ne me sentirai pas malchanceuse quand mon nom n’apparaîtra pas sur l’écran. Peut-être que j’aurais envie d’acheter des billets, à ce moment-là, mais ça, c’est juste la manière dont marche le processus de décision…

Oh et aussi parce que j’adorerais m’acheter un appartement à New York, pour lire toute la journée à Brooklyn, à Manhattan. Dans un cliché, quoi.

Top

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Mistaking decisions for luck

  1. I used to believe that everyone around me was lucky, that they were all so lucky to have the money and position to do so much. Far too late did I realise that none of it was luck, or fate for that matter. Those people chose to make changes and they became the people I knew (and still know) because of it.

    There is no luck, it’s purposeful choices that make great things happen.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you very much for your comment, Dale. What I really like about what you’re saying here is how not believing in luck didn’t make you a pessimist, on the contrary: it empowered you! I really admire this.

    The only thing that is luck or bad luck, I’d say, is how whatever you do, sometimes, you sadly meet an asshole… And you’re not responsible for their behaviour, so there, there’s truly nothing you can do if they act violently or agressively… Still, even in that case, we can collectively impact the bad luck factor by raising awareness about violence, domination, etc. What individuals can’t do, people together can.

    Like

  3. Sometimes it’s so hard to see what role luck plays in things. I definitely consider myself lucky, but you’re right, most of where we end up comes from the decisions we make about how to live our lives and take advantage of our lucky circumstances.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very much Silvia for reading and commenting. I totally agree with what you’re saying: I’ve always considered myself very lucky, because there are many things for which I have to be grateful and for which I’m not responsible… – being born in a loving family and without major health problem, etc. It’s important to remember that we’re lucky when we are. But as you said, it’s as important to remember to take advantage of lucky circumstances when we can! Wishing you all the best, and thanks again!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s