How Others Can Help Us To Break Free From Denial… Without Being Judgemental

french flag pastel

I’ve been taught never to start an essay with ‘for years’ or ‘for decades, etc.’ That’s why I’ll start like that. I’m such a rebel.

For years, I’ve felt real compassion for people who were dealing with mental health issues. I mean, I truly was compassionate. I thought: poor them, it must be awful to live such an existence, and what’s even worst, most of the time they don’t even know they have a condition… That’s denial. It must be so painful.

Yeah, right.

For instance: workaholism. Oh lord, did I think they made poor choices, those who lived that way! I watched documentaries on this spreading illness, with stress and competition factors brought to us by buzzwords such as ‘success’ and ‘achievements’. And I thanked god all the time for not suffering from such an addiction to work. I just loved my job so much. It was completely different, you see. I cared so much about my students and colleagues. It wasn’t an addiction, no, it was dedication.

Then one day one of my flatmates, a very clever and friendly guy, suggested I could be a workaholic. I mean, he didn’t say it like it was even the focus of the conversation… It was as if he was stating the obvious, so why elaborate? It was something like this: ‘as a workaholic yourself, surely you know that…’ followed by words I can’t remember. Because the word ‘workaholic’ took all the available room in my brain at that very moment.

I thought to myself: What did he just say?! But I’m so not a workaholic! I love what I’m doing, that’s sooo different!

Alright then. Let’s apply this logic to another addiction, just to see how well it works.
– You’re an alcoholic.
– Not at all, I just love alcohol!
– Wait… I… Okay, nevermind.

I didn’t want to believe it. A workaholic is someone who’s no longer in control. I couldn’t NOT be in control. I wanted to have an interesting job is all.

And what’s being in control anyway? If it means you can stop when you want, well, then… I can’t really answer, because I never wanted to stop.

In fact I had forgotten what ‘to want’ meant. Was it when you were so tired that you finally fell asleep on the keyboard? Was it when you were not really enjoying that seventh meal of the day, because you had been awake for 32 hours and you needed more and more food to keep going?

‘No, I’m not a workaholic.’
That’s what my brain kept repeating.

Just as someone who transfers alcohol in innocent containers so that family members don’t notice, I always tried to wrap up my work in some other cool activities. I wasn’t reading more critical analysis of literature, I was being a voracious reader. I wasn’t avoiding watching TV and going out, I’d just much prefer being on my own for days and week, contemplating my laptop. Because, see, I wasn’t typing for 18 hours straight, I was just being over-inspired.

Damn you, inspiration.

Inspiration was my word for ‘I literally can’t stop, I swear I don’t remember how to.’ I might as well pretend I liked it.

Months later, my other flatmate, himself a very clever and friendly guy, suggested to watch movies. Or maybe it was me who suggested that. Anyway, movies were on the to-enjoy list for the evening.

I said to him: ‘do you mind if I come to the living room with my laptop, I just have a few editing to do on an article, it’ll only take 20 minutes?’ It was something like 10pm.

In the background was French movie La Haine, a masterpiece. That we watched on my recommendation… Or that one of us was watching anyway…

When I was done with editing – done for the day, as the day after was spent undoing everything I had done by editing some more – it was about 2am. My flatmate was exhausted.

Bless him, he waited all this time with me, and he wasn’t even angry.

La Haine was over. We wanted to watch Seven. We said we would watch Seven.
We didn’t watch Seven.
I did though.
I did watch it because I felt so incredibly guilty. Why was it that I was surrounded by great people wanting to share real experiences and conversations, people I enjoyed so much spending time with, and that I had to hide behind a huge pile of repetitive tasks?

My flatmate fell asleep on the couch.

I apologised to him so many times the day after. He said it was okay, ‘don’t worry!’ Of course, because he’s a great guy. But it wasn’t okay. It wasn’t okay at all to be unable to spend one freaking evening without working for hours.

Now that I’ve had a real breakdown and completely changed the way I live and consider daily experiences, I realise how lucky I was to meet such people. My flatmates. Because they knew it wasn’t okay, but at the same time they didn’t try to convince me of anything. They told me that I should care more about myself, care less about getting everything perfect for the job, but they’ve never been judgemental towards me and my shitty lifestyle.

Again, perhaps because they’re smart and kind people, they knew that I wouldn’t listen anyway, as I was completely blind to my own reflection in the mirror.

I’ve lived with them for about a year. And they’ve been more important to me than they probably think they have. Because they’ve shared my life on this last run. The one before I completely fell apart.

They’ve been honest, yet never hurtful. They’ve told me I was working too much, because I was. But they never said: ‘what you’re doing is the dumbest thing I’ve ever seen! You don’t even enjoy life! You workaholic people are stupid.’

Most working days, I was coming home between 7 and 8pm, then 8 and 9pm, then 9 and 10pm. And it’s only because the building needed to be locked up at 10pm that I left. I would have stayed there the whole night, maybe. I don’t know. I don’t want to know.

So yeah, I was a workaholic. I thought I was so different. I couldn’t be a workaholic, because I loved my job, AND I chose what I did, AND I had a great manager and supportive supervisors, AND my colleagues were helpful, AND the workplace was set in such a beautiful landscape, AND it was to be expected to have long days because I was an early-career academic, AND it will all eventually calm down, AND intellectual work isn’t as exhausting as manual jobs anyway, AND I was privileged to even be in such a position, AND I didn’t like resting that much, AND I’ve always loved reading, so why would it matter if I read for work instead of my own pleasure, AND I could go on and on but you get the idea.

You need no reason when what you’re doing is right. That’s the difference. Now my day is no longer filled with self-justifications. Having to struggle with your own ethics and values says a lot about where you are in life.

I would never have judged anyone with a lower position on the social scale.

I never considered salary, career and promotion as goals in my life.

I’d always said that people who spend their life at work would regret it one day.

Yet I was doing all of this, because, you know: it was different. But it wasn’t. Whatever your job, if you can’t ever stop, yes, you’re a workaholic. Just as you’re an alcoholic whatever the alcohol you chose to fill yourself with, if you can’t stop drinking. You can’t say: ‘oh, yes, but wait, it’s the intellectual side I’m interested in’, or ‘it makes me smarter’…

I’m not saying you should work less. I’m not even saying you should drink less. Honestly, I don’t know. Everyone does what is right for them. However, just as with alcoholism, workaholism doesn’t affect just you. It affects your family, friends, partners, colleagues… How different are you with them only because of your addiction?

I don’t think I’ve been a great flatmate. I was absent most of the time, and when I was at home I was in my room typing away or doing some work-related admin.

The day one of my flatmates moved out, I didn’t say goodbye to him in the evening, since I was literally stuck on campus, doing my usual OCD routine. Which was worsened by the fact that I really want to see my flatmate before he left. Therefore I couldn’t see him. Makes sense, doesn’t it?

The two men I told you about here, they’ve been great flatmates, probably because they’re great human beings. I could have learned a lot more from them if I hadn’t avoided existing so much, that’s true. But I’ve learned an awful lot with them already.

For instance, for the first time in years, because I wasn’t living alone, it didn’t really feel okay to work all the time. It felt weird.

That’s why even though it’s been fifteen months already since we last lived together, I still feel their presence everytime I enjoy a movie. Without any laptop, without editing, but with the whole evening for myself.

So now they know it.


Comment les autres peuvent nous aider à quitter le déni… sans pour autant nous juger.

On m’a appris à ne jamais commencer une rédac ou une dissert par les mots: “depuis plusieurs années /des décennies, etc.” C’est pour ça que je commencerai précisément par là. C’est que je suis tellement une rebelle…

Depuis plusieurs années déjà, je ressens une réelle compassion pour les gens qui souffrent de troubles intérieurs (en anglais on dit « mentaux », mais en français ça fait tellement lourd, tellement médicamenteux, je change pour le cliché. J’hésite quand même.) Ce que je veux dire, c’est que j’ai vraiment compati. Je me disais : les pauvres, ça doit être horrible de vivre comme ça, et ce qui est encore pire, c’est que la plupart du temps ils ne se rendent pas même compte qu’ils ont un problème mental. C’est du déni. Ça doit être tellement douloureux.

Ouais, d’accord, c’est ça…

Par exemple : la dépendance, l’addiction au travail. Combien j’ai pu penser qu’ils faisaient erreur, ceux qui vivaient de cette manière… Je regardais des documentaires sur cette maladie de plus en plus courante, le stress et la compétition étant deux facteurs que nous ont joyeusement amenés les mots du moment, “succès” et “réussite”. Et je remerciais le ciel de ne pas souffrir moi-même d’une telle dépendance au travail. J’aimais tellement mon boulot. C’était complètement différent, voyez-vous. Je me sentais tellement investie dans le parcours de mes étudiants, dans le quotidien de mes collègues. Ça n’était pas une dépendance, non pas du tout, c’était du dévouement.

Et puis un jour un de mes colocataires, un gars très intelligent et tout autant sympa, a suggéré que j’étais peut-être une droguée du travail. En fait, il ne l’a même pas dit comme si c’était ça le point central de la conversation. C’était comme s’il constatait des évidences, alors à quoi bon creuser, argumenter ? C’était un truc dans ce style : « en tant que droguée du travail, tu dois bien savoir, toi, que… ». Ont suivi des mots dont je ne me souviens pas le moins du monde. Parce que, là, le mot « droguée du travail » avait pris toute la place disponible dans mon cerveau.

Je me suis dit : attends, il vient de dire quoi, là ? Mais je ne suis tellement pas une droguée du travail ! J’adore ce que je fais moi, c’est complèèèèèètement différent !

Ouais, okay. Essayons d’appliquer cette logique à une autre dépendance, juste pour voir à quel point c’est efficace et sensé.
– Tu es alcoolique.
– Pas du tout, j’aime juste beaucoup l’alcool!
– Ah ouais!Okay, au temps pour moi.

Je ne voulais pas y croire. Une droguée du travail, c’est quelqu’un qui ne peut plus se contrôler. Non, ça ne pouvait pas être ça dans mon cas. Je voulais avoir un boulot qui m’intéressait, c’est tout.

Et qu’est-ce que ça veut dire, de toute façon, se contrôler ? Si ça veut dire que tu peux arrêter quand tu en as envie, ben… Je ne pouvais pas savoir, parce que je n’avais jamais eu vraiment envie d’arrêter.

En fait j’avais oublié ce que « vouloir » voulait dire. Est-ce que ça voulait dire quand on est tellement crevée qu’on s’endort sur le clavier ? Est-ce que ça voulait dire ne plus vraiment apprécier le septième repas de la journée, parce que ça fait 32 heures qu’on est debout et qu’on a besoin de plus de nourriture pour fonctionner encore ?

« Non, je ne suis pas une droguée du travail. »
C’est ce que mon cerveau répétait sans cesse.

Tout comme quelqu’un qui transvase son alcool dans d’autres bouteilles innocentes pour que les membres de la famille ne se rendent compte de rien, j’essayais toujours d’enrubanner mon travail dans quelque activité récréative. Je ne lisais pas plus d’analyse critique de la littérature, j’étais juste une lectrice dévoreuse de livres. Je n’évitais pas de regarder la télé et je n’évitais pas de sortir, je préférais juste de loin être seule pendant des jours et des semaines, à contempler mon écran d’ordi. Parce que je ne tapais pas à l’ordi 18 heures de suite, non non, j’étais juste ultra-inspirée.

Inspiration, je t’emmerde.

L’inspiration, c’était mon mot pour: « je ne peux littéralement plus m’arrêter, je vous jure que je ne me rappelle plus comment on fait. » Alors tant qu’à le vivre, pourquoi pas faire semblant d’aimer ça?

Quelques mois plus tard, mon autre colocataire, lui-même très intelligent et toujours autant sympa, me suggéra de regarder des films. Ou peut-être que c’est moi qui ai suggéré ça. Peu importe, l’idée c’est que regarder ds films était au programme de cette soirée-là.

Je lui ai dit : « ça t’embête pas si je viens au salon avec mon ordi, j’ai juste deux-trois trucs à modifier dans un article, ça prendra juste 20 minutes ? » Il était à peu près 22h.

Dans le fond du salon passait le film La Haine, ce chef d’œuvre. Qu’on regardait justement sur ma propre recommandation. Ou plutôt que l’un d’entre nous regardait, en tout cas.

Quand j’en eus fini avec mes modifications (enfin, fini pour la journée, puisque le jour d’après a été consacré à défaire tout ce que je venais de faire en re-modifiant encore et encore), il était 2 heures du matin. Mon coloc était épuisé.

J’étais – je suis encore – tellement touchée. Il avait attendu tout ce temps-là avec moi, et il n’était pas même fâché.

La Haine, c’était fini. On voulait regarder Seven. On avait dit qu’on regarderait Seven.
On n’a pas regardé Seven.
Moi j’ai regardé.
J’ai regardé Seven parce que je me sentais d’une culpabilité tellement puissante. Comment ça se faisait que j’étais entourée de gens géniaux qui voulaient partager de vraies expériences, de vraies conversations, des gens avec qui j’aimais tellement passer du temps, et que je devais toujours me cacher derrière une haute pile de tâches répétitives, qui n’en finissait jamais ?

Mon coloc s’est endormi sur le canapé.

Je lui ai demandé pardon tellement de fois le lendemain. Il a dit que c’était pas grave, « t’inquiète pas » ! Bien sûr, parce que c’est tellement un chouette gars. Mais non, en fait, le truc, c’est que c’était grave. C’était grave de ne pas pouvoir passer un seul putain de soir sans bosser pendant des heures.

Maintenant que j’ai complètement craqué, et complètement changé la manière dont je vis et dont j’envisage ces expériences quotidiennes, je me rends compte à quel point j’ai eu de la chance de rencontrer des gens comme ça. Mes colocataires. Parce qu’à la fois ils savaient que c’était grave, non, c’était pas « rien », mais qu’ils n’essayaient pas de me convaincre de quoi que ce soit. Ils m’ont dit que je devrais faire davantage attention à moi, ne pas vouloir toujours à tout prix faire mon boulot parfaitement, mais ils n’ont jamais jugé négativement, avec supériorité, ni ma personne ni mon mode de vie merdique.

Encore une fois, parce que ce sont des gars intelligents et bienveillants, ils savaient sûrement que de toute façon que je n’écouterais pas, puisque j’étais aveugle de mon propre reflet dans le miroir.

J’ai vécu avec eux pendant un an à peu près. Et ils ont été plus importants pour moi qu’ils pensent sûrement l’avoir été. Parce qu’ils ont partagé ma vie dans cette dernière course-là. Celle avant que je ne craque vraiment de partout.

Ils ont été honnêtes, mais jamais blessants. Ils m’ont dit que je travaillais trop, parce que je travaillais trop. Mais ils ne m’ont jamais dit : « ce que tu fais, c’est le truc le plus débile que j’ai jamais vu de ma vie ! Vous, les drogués du boulot, vous êtes tellement tarés. »

La plupart des jours où je travallais, j’arrivais à la maison entre 19h et 20h, puis entre 20h et 21h, puis entre 21h et 22h. Et c’est seulement parce que le bâtiment devait être fermé et mis sous alarme à 22h que je partais. Je serais restée là-bas toute la nuit, peut-être. Je sais pas. Je veux pas savoir.

Alors ouais, j’étais une droguée du travail. Je pensais être tellement différente. Je ne pouvais pas être une droguée du boulot, parce que j’aimais mon boulot, ET que je l’avais choisi, ET que j’avais un super directeur et de supers chefs, ET que mes collègues étaient tellement encourageants, ET que l’endroit où on bossait, c’était tellement beau, ET qu’il fallait bien s’y attendre à ce qu’il y ait de longues journées parce que je venais de commencer ma « carrière » dans le milieu universitaire, ET que ça se calmerait avec le temps, ET que le travail intellectuel n’est pas aussi épuisant que le travail physique de toute façon, ET que j’étais privilégiée d’avoir cette position quoi qu’il en soit, ET que finalement, moi j’aimais pas trop me reposer, alors tu vois ça tombait bien, ET que j’avais toujours aimé lire, alors pourquoi ça changerait quelque chose de lire pour le boulot plutôt que pour son plaisir personnel, ET je pourrais ne jamais m’arrêter mais je pense que vous avez compris l’idée générale

Quand ce qu’on fait est la bonne chose à faire, on n’a besoin d’aucune raison. C’est ça, la différence. Maintenant mes journées ne sont plus remplies d’auto-justifications. Avoir à lutter sans arrêt contre sa propre éthique et ses propres valeurs en dit long sur la vie que l’on s’est fondée.

Je n’aurais jamais jugé quelqu’un qui aurait été sur un échelon social perçu comme inférieur.

Je n’ai jamais pensé que le salaire, la carrière ou les promotions faisaient partie des objectifs de la vie.

J’avais toujours dit que les gens qui passaient leur vie au boulot le regretteraient de toute façon un jour ou l’autre.

Et pourtant je faisais moi aussi tout ça, parce que, vous voyez: j’étais différente. Mais en fait je ne l’étais pas pour un rond. Quel que soit notre poste, si on ne parvient jamais à s’arrêter, c’est qu’on est drogué du travail. Tout comme on est alcoolique quel que soit l’alcool avec lequel on choisit de se remplir, si on n’arrive pas à arrêter. On ne peut pas dire : « nan mais attends, c’est le côté intellectuel de la chose qui m’intéresse », ou « comme ça je me couche moins con »…

Je ne dis pas que vous devriez travailler moins. Franchement, je ne dis même pas que vous devriez moins boire. Honnêtement, qu’est-ce que j’en sais ? Chacun fait ce qui est juste pour soi. Néanmoins, tout comme l’alcoolisme, la dépendance au travail n’a pas seulement une influence sur nous. Ça a une influence sur notre famille, nos amis, nos partenaires, nos collègues… En quoi notre addiction change-t-elle le rapport qu’on a avec eux ?

Je ne pense pas avoir été une bonne colocataire. J’étais absente la plupart du temps, et quand j’étais à la maison j’étais enfermée dans ma chambre à taper à l’ordi ou à finir une quelconque tâche administrative.

Le jour où l’un des colocs a déménagé, je ne lui ai pas dit au revoir le soir, parce que j’étais vissée à la fac, en train de répéter mes rites de TOC. Rites qui se trouvaient empirés par le fait que je voulais vraiment voir mon coloc avant qu’il ne parte. Donc je n’ai pas pu le voir. C’est logique, hein ?

Les deux hommes dont je vous ai parlé là ont été des colocs géniaux, sûrement parce que ce sont des êtres humains géniaux. J’aurais pu encore plus apprendre d’eux si je n’avais pas autant évité d’exister, c’est vrai. Mais j’ai déjà appris un paquet de trucs avec eux.

Par exemple, pour la première fois depuis des années, parce que je ne vivais plus seule, ça ne me parassait pas aussi normal qu’avant de travailler tout le temps. Je me sentais bizarre, quelque part.

C’est pour ça que même si ça fait quinze mois déjà qu’on n’a plus vécu ensemble, je sens encore leur présence à chaque fois que je regarde un bon film. Un film sans mon ordi, sans modifications à apporter à un article, mais avec au contraire toute la soirée vraiment pour moi.

Et maintenant ils le savent.

Top

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s