‘I’m Not Crazy!’ OCD, Depression and the Fear of Being a Freak

french flag pastel

How many people have you met, who’ve replied to your suggestion of maybe talking about their mental health issues to a specialist by saying: ‘oh but I’m not crazy, you know, I don’t need any doctor!’? This implies that those who seek help may well be really crazy. And that the minute you admit to perhaps having a problem, you’re in fact proving that you’re crazy.

I wouldn’t call anyone seeking help a crazy person. In fact, sounds to me like it’s a very rational and logical thing to do.

And yet I must admit I wasn’t ready to allow myself to seeking help.

I didn’t use the line ‘I’m not crazy’ to defend myself. By the way I’ve never thought that only if you were crazy did you need help. However, it took me years to finally get that help I could never have done without. So why is that?

Well it pains me to say it, but maybe, without me even knowing, I was maintaining myself within the ranks of ‘normal people’ by not going to see some sort of psychiatrist or psychologist. Really, it wasn’t something intentional. But the more I’ve thought about it, the less I could deny it. I can swap words and say that it’s because I wanted to be amongst the strong rather than the weak ones… This doesn’t sound any better, does it?

I used to say, too: ‘I’ve got no problem talking about OCD (I didn’t acknowledge my depression for years, but OCD I did), ask me whatever you want! Sure, I’m not ashamed, I’m really open about it!’ Oh yeah… are you, really? So yes I was open if someone asked me specifically: ‘so, do you check the papers you’re grading twenty times to make sure you didn’t write any offensive and insulting comment?’ But really, who’s going to ask that, especially if they don’t have OCD and therefore can’t even comprehend the question… Why would you think you’ve written something you didn’t want to write???

I was open about OCD, while developing very complex rituals so that people wouldn’t know I have OCD in the first place.

How many times have I told my friends: just go, I’ll meet you there, because I knew I’d need 15 minutes to check the door? How many times have I pretended that I needed to get back home to look for something I had forgotten, while really I just needed to walk again on the same path to un-do all bad thoughts I’d had on the way out? And how many times, when I suddenly needed to check something behind me, have I pretended: ‘oh, I thought I’d seen someone I know.’ When really, I needed to look at that window again to make sure its lines were not uneven, and stay very well structured in my mind. – by the way, don’t worry if that doesn’t make too much sense. It’s just that for me, it feels ‘right’ to do things over and over. There are many ways to make them pass for healthy, relaxed behaviour.

Was I that open about OCD? Can I honestly say that I could have said whatever, and that it didn’t bother me at all? Then why, when I had to take sick leave, which would turn into resignation and a career change, did I hide from my closest colleagues what I was really facing? The response is simple: ‘well, if I tell them that… What are they going to think of me? Aren’t they going to be scared of me now? And uncomfortable in every one of our interactions?’ Which really, is just another way of saying: please please please don’t think I’m crazy, I’m just having a bad time lately…

I’m not having a bad time lately. I’m having OCD for life. Now wait: not being able to completely cure something doesn’t mean life has to be extra-hard. For the first time in my life I don’t need to hide it, and even though I still have to fight it, it is a lot less tiring than it used to be. Because at least I’ve removed from myself the burden of pretending I had no issues.

Sure, it’s scary, and you don’t have to be open about it if you don’t want to be. What’s more, there are still many risks to openness. You can miss career opportunities (who will give greater responsibilities to someone like me?), or at least fear that you will, you can encounter people who pretend they understand and laugh at you in your back. – Walls are thin, you guys.
But what I’m trying to say is that asking for help has nothing to do with admitting you’re crazy. I won’t pat you on the back and say that you’re not. I’d just say that it depends what the meaning of that word is. I’m very much aware of the social stigma some words may carry, I’m not denying you the chance to escape them. The truth is: people who’d think you’re crazy, they probably already think you are, so don’t worry about convincing them.

Here’s another perspective: are you crazy for having the flu or a cold? I don’t think so. It’s your body reacting to a situation it can’t deal with, at least momentarily. Well, my OCD and depression gave me the same sort of signs in relation to my mind, I just didn’t want to listen. I was doing too much, putting far too much pressure on myself, I wanted to succeed on all fronts, all the time, and be kind, and beautiful, and intelligent, and a nice girlfriend, and great in bed, and a fantastic cooker yet a very modern independent woman… I think what was crazy is the fact that I’ve thought for even one minute that I could do all of this without suffering a great deal. I can’t. I’ve decided I no longer can, neither do I need to, and man!… does that feel good.

I’m telling you what’s crazy: it’s the fact that we’re so sure we shouldn’t be. I’m not romanticizing mental illness, it’s such a pain to live with. It’s not cool, and it doesn’t make you an artist, far from it. But it seems to me like a logical way your mind sometimes finds to react when you no longer pay attention to other signs.

So I was supposed to deal with so many different stuff – self-imposed tasks, but not only – in so little time, accept that the separation between my private life and my job would forever be nonexistent, and that there was a way I could cope with it normally, smiling and all??? Well, the life I was living was not normal in terms of what is recommended in terms of self-preservation. It was normal with regard to social norms. Big difference. Social norms are crazy. Let me tell you that.

So you’re in your kitchen crying your eyes out because a boy – or a girl – or anyone in between – has cheated on you for the umpteenth time. And you think: I must be crazy to cry like that, after all we’ve only been going out for only two weeks. Rationally, you fear that something doesn’t make sense. And yet think back, rationally: what have everyone told you about relationships, like, ever? That without them you weren’t anything, you were worthless. We build up a society in which each of us has to be perfect, and then we can’t understand that none of us fits in, and that it feels like a mini-tragedy every time we fail.
I no longer care. I’m crazy if you wish, I’m not if you prefer not to call me that. But I sure am no longer ashamed that people might think I am, have been, or will be.

You know what, as evidence of the fact that you’re not as crazy as you think you are, I’ll tell you a few things that I do, or used to do. And remember, that while dealing with all that what-the-fuck shit, I still had – and have a very normal life, a very normal job, and very normal social relationships.

I begged someone to take a two-hour train and metro trip to check that I hadn’t left the light on in my studio. In my phone I have pictures of the oven and cooker on different days and from different angles, because after 30 minutes I still couldn’t decide whether or not the gas was really off but I had to go. So I took pictures that I could check in the train, then in the airport, then while flying, then in a different country. Sometimes people had to come help me get out my flat because I was terrified of leaving. I get extremely anxious when I lock a door, and I can’t talk or not focus only on the very action of locking while I’m doing it, otherwise the anxiety will linger for hours. I count in my head when I check stuff. I fear that if I haven’t washed my hands properly after having food, someone will come behind me and touch the same book or object I’ve touched, and then die because they have an allergy to a nut or a veg or anything that I ate. I used to smell the inside of my bins to make sure there wasn’t a fire. And when I check a clock or a light, I need to nod my head three times, or four depending of what seems right at the time, so that I can consider things checked. Otherwise it is just half-checked. Every morning I need to look inside my toaster to make sure there are no flames, and after that I put my hand down on three different parts of the toaster – always the same ones – to double-check. Then I check the windows, the tap and the gas in a very specific way. Like in my bedroom, I can only start checking things from right to left. And if for some reason something captures my attention during this highly ritualized look around, I need to re-do the all thing, or someone will die and some people will forever miss a dear member of their family and I will go to prison. I’ve also re-opened many envelopes, as I feared that there were drugs in them (drugs I don’t even take, so who knows how they could have ended up there, but there you go…), or poison, or a confidential letter about a friend, or I needed to read the postcard again to make sure I didn’t write: ‘fuck you assholes’ to people I truly love and respect. I can’t put letters in a postal box without looking back as I’m leaving, to ensure I haven’t dropped them outside of the box.

Call me crazy if you like, call me normal if you wish, I equally don’t care. I’ve got issues, like we all do, and I swear I’m never accepting again that normality is a miserable life of self-shame and guilt. There are so many ways to find help (medical and non-medical, literature is awesome at that too, and listening to the Spice Girls while eating chips), so just be confident that you will find the one that suits you.


« Mais j’suis pas folle ! » TOC, dépression, et la peur d’être tarée
Combien de gens avez-vous rencontrés, qui ont répondu à votre suggestion d’aller peut-être voir quelqu’un pour parler de leurs problèmes psychologiques, par un : « ah non mais je ne suis pas fou/folle, hein, je n’ai pas besoin de docteur ! » Ce qui implique que ceux qui demandent de l’aide doivent donc être réellement fous. Et qu’à la minute où l’on admet que l’on a un souci, on prouve en fait qu’on est taré. CQFD.
Je n’appellerais certainement pas quelqu’un qui demande de l’aide un ou une taré(e). En fait, ça m’a même l’air d’être un acte assez rationnel et logique.

Pourtant je dois admettre que je n’étais pas prête à m’autoriser moi-même à chercher de l’aide.
Je n’utilisais pas la phrase « je ne suis pas folle » pour me défendre. D’ailleurs je n’ai jamais cru que seul un fou pouvait demander de l’aide. Cependant, ça m’a pris des années à accepter de chercher l’aide sans laquelle rien ne se serait arrangé. Pourquoi ça ?
Ça me fait mal de le reconnaître, mais peut-être que sans même que je m’en rende compte, je me maintenais dans les rangs des gens « normaux » en n’allant pas voir un psychiatre ou un psychologue. Je crois pas que ça ait été intentionnel. Mais plus j’y pense, moins je peux le nier. Je peux bien changer les mots et dire que je voulais appartenir aux forts plutôt qu’aux faibles… Mais je ne crois pas que ça soit tellement mieux…
Je disais aussi: “ah nan mais j’ai aucun problème à parler de mes TOC (pendant des annés je n’ai pas admis ma dépression, mais mes TOC, si), demande-moi ce que tu veux ! » Ah oui, t’es si ouverte que ça, vraiment ? Alors oui, j’étais ouverte si quelqu’un me demandait très précisément : « alors, est-ce que tu vérifies les copies que tu corriges une vingtaine de fois pour être sûre que tu n’as pas écrit une insulte quelque part en commentaire ? » mais bon, qui allait me demander ça, surtout parmi les gens qui n’ont pas de TOC et qui ne peuvent donc déjà même pas comprendre le fondement de la question ? Pourquoi est-ce que tu écrirais quelque chose que tu n’as pas envie d’écrire ???

J’étais ouverte concernant mes TOC, tout en développant quantité de rituels complexes pour que les gens ne remarquent pas qu’en fait j’en avais.

Combien de fois ai-je dit à mes amis : allez-y, je vous rejoins là-bas, parce que je savais qu’il me faudrait 15 minutes supplémentaires pour vérifier la porte ? Combien de fois ai-je prétendu devoir rentrer à la maison chercher un truc que j’avais oublié, alors qu’en fait je voulais juste refaire le chemin à l’envers pour défaire toutes les mauvais pensées que j’avais eues durant le trajet aller ? Et combien de fois, alors que j’avais soudain besoin de vérifier quelque chose derrière moi, ai-je dit : « oh, je croyais avoir vu quelqu’un que je connaissais » ? Alors qu’en fait, je voulais juste revoir un truc que j’avais vu, cette vitrine par exemple, pour que ses lignes restent bien droites et structurées dans ma tête. Par ailleurs, ne vous inquiétez pas si cela ne veut pas dire grand-chose pour vous. C’est juste que pour moi, refaire les mêmes choses encore et encore paraît rassurant, et qu’il existe de nombreuses façons de faire passer ce comportement comme étant sain et détendu.
Est-ce que j’étais si ouverte que ça à propos des TOC ? Puis-je vraiment affirmer que j’aurais pu dire n’importe quoi, et que je m’en fichais ? Alors pourquoi est-ce que quand j’ai été en arrêt maladie, qui s’est ensuite transformé en démission et en changement de carrière, ai-je caché à mes collègues les plus proches la vraie raison de mon absence ? le réponse est simple : « ben, si je leur dis ça… Qu’est-ce qu’ils vont penser de moi? Est-ce que je ne vais pas les faire un peu flipper maintenant ? Est-ce qu’ils ne vont pas se sentir mal à l’aise lors de toutes nos interactions ? » ce qui revient en fait à dire : s’il vous plaît s’il vous plaît s’il vous plaît ne pensez pas que je suis folle, je traverse juste une mauvaise passe ces derniers temps.

En vrai je ne traverse pas une-mauvaise-passe-ces-derniers-temps. J’ai des TOC à vie, nuance. Attendez : ne pas être capable de complètement guérir de quelque chose ne signifie pas que notre vie sera forcément terriblement difficile. Pour la première fois de ma vie je n’ai pas à le cacher, et même si je dois encore me battre contre, c’est beaucoup moins fatigant que ça ne l’était. Parce qu’au moins, je me suis débarrassée de ce fardeau de devoir prétendre que je n’avais aucun souci.
Bien sûr, c’est flippant, et vous n’avez pas à être ouvert là-dessus si vous ne le souhaitez pas. De plus, il y a pas mal de risques à être ouvert là-dessus. Certaines opportunités professionnelles peuvent ne pas se présenter (qui donnerait davantage de responsabilités à quelqu’un qui flippe comme moi ?), ou en tout cas on en a peur, on peut aussi rencontrer des gens qui font semblant de vous comprendre et qui rigolent de vous dans votre dos. – les gars, les murs sont pas si épais que ça.
Mais ce que j’essaie de dire c’est que demander de l’aide n’a rien à voir avec le fait d’admettre ou non que vous êtes fou. Je ne vais pas vous tapoter gentiment le dos en vous disant que vous ne l’êtes pas. Je dirais juste que ça dépend du sens qu’on donne à ce mot. Je suis parfaitement consciente du stigma que peuvent porter de pareilles étiquettes, alors je ne vais pas vous enlever la possibilité d’en échapper. La vérité, cela dit, c’est que les gens qui penseraient que vous êtes fou le pensent sûrement déjà, alors les convaincre ne doit certainement pas vous inquiéter.

Prenons la chose sous un autre angle: est-ce que vous êtes fou d’attraper la grippe ou un rhume ? je ne pense pas, non. C’est votre corps qui réagit à une situation qu’il ne peut pas contrôler, en tout cas momentanément. Mes TOC et ma dépression m’ont donné le même genre de signes, mais concernant mon esprit, et j’ai juste voulu ne pas écouter. Je faisais trop de choses, je me mettais trop la pression, je voulais réussir en tous domaines, tout le temps, et être gentille, et belle, et intelligente, et une gentille petite-amie, et super au lit, et une super cuisinière et en même temps une femme indépendante tellement moderne… Je crois que ce qui était fou, c’est d’avoir pensé même une seconde que je pourrais faire tout ça sans souffrir énormément pour y arriver. En fait, je ne peux pas faire tout ça. Et je n’ai pas besoin de faire tout ça. Et putain !… quest-ce que ça soulage !
Je vais vous dire ce qui est fou: c’est qu’on soit tellement persuadés qu’il ne faille pas l’être, fou, justement. Je ne veux pas rendre les problèmes d’ordre psychologique romantiques et attirants. Ce n’est pas une attitude cool, et ça ne fait pas de quelqu’un un artiste incompris, loin de là. Mais ça me paraît être une réaction plutôt logique quand on ne prête plus attention à d’autres signes.
J’étais donc censée accomplir un nombre énorme de tâches – tâches que je m’imposais parfois toute seule, parfois pas – en un temps relativement court, accepter que la frontière entre ma vie professionnelle et ma vie privée soit inexistante, et qu’il y ait un moyen de faire tout ça en souriant et en sifflotant ? La vie que je menais n’était pas normale vis-à-vis des fondements essentielles de la préservation de soi, mais elle l’était vis-à-vis de normes sociales. Nuance. Ce sont les normes sociales qui sont dingues, je vous le dis.
Vous êtes en train de pleurer de toute vos forces dans la cuisine parce que ce gars, ou cette meuf, ou n’importe qui au milieu, vous a trompé pour la énième fois. Et vous vous dites : Je dois être taré(e) d’en pleurer autant, après tout on n’était ensemble que depuis deux semaines. Rationnellement, vous sentez qu’un truc ne tient pas debout. Mais repensez un autre truc, pour voir : qu’est-ce qu’on vous a toujours dit à propos des relations ? Que sans elles, sans copain ou copine vous n’étiez rien, vous n’aviez aucune valeur. On érige une société dans laquelle chacun d’entre nous doit être parfait, et ensuite on s’étonne qu’aucun d’entre nous ne rentre dans ce moule-là, et chaque fois qu’on échoue c’est une mini-tragédie.

Maintenant je m’en tape. Je suis folle si vous voulez, je ne le suis pas si vous préférez ne pas me nommer ainsi. Mais ce qui est sûr, c’est que je n’ai plus honte de ce que les gens peuvent penser que je suis, ou ai été, ou serai.
Je vais même vous dire, pour vous prouver que vous n’êtes pas aussi fou ou folle que vous pensez l’être, quelques-uns des trucs que je fais, ou que je faisais. Et souvenez-vous, en lisant ça, que malgré tous ces trucs complètement barrés, j’avais et j’ai pourtant une vie très normale, avec un boulot très normal, et des relations sociales très normales elles aussi.
J’ai supplié quelqu’un de faire un trajet de deux heures en train et en métro pour vérifier que je n’avais pas laissé la lumière allumée dans mon studio. Dans mon téléphone, j’ai des photos du four et de la cuisinière, à des jours et sous des angles différents, qui datent de ces fois-là où même après 30 minutes devant, je n’arrivais toujours pas à savoir si le gaz était ouvert ou fermé, mais que je devais partir quand même. Alors je prenais des photos que je pourrais continuer de vérifier dans le train, à l’aéroport, dans l’avion, et puis dans un autre pays. Parfois des gens ont dû venir m’aider à sortir de mon appartement car j’étais terrifiée à l’idée de sortir. Je suis extrêmement anxieuse quand je dois fermer une porte à clef, et je ne peux pas parler ou faire autre chose que de me concentrer uniquement sur le geste de fermer au moment où je le fais, autrement l’angoisse restera dans mon ventre pendant des heures. Je compte dans ma tête quand je vérifie des trucs. J’ai peur que si je ne me lave pas parfaitement les mains après avoir mangé un truc, quelqu’un posera sa main sur le même livre ou le même objet que j’ai touché et mourra car il ou elle est allergique aux noix, aux légumes ou à n’importe quoi que je mange. Je reniflais l’intérieur de ma poubelle pour être sûre qu’il n’y avait pas de feu à l’intérieur. Quand je vérifie une horloge ou une lumière, je dois hocher ma tête trois ou quatre fois selon le moment, et ce n’est qu’avoir fait ça qui m’aide à me convaincre que j’ai vérifié. Sinon ça n’est vérifié qu’à moitié. Tous les matins je dois regarder à l’intérieur du grille-pain pour être sûre qu’il n’y ait pas de flammes, et après ça je pose ma main à trois endroit différents, toujours les mêmes, pour être vraiment vraiment sûre. Ensuite je vérifie les fenêtres, le robinet et le gaz selon un processus bien spécifique. En effet, tout comme dans ma chambre, je ne peux vérifier les choses que de la droite vers la gauche. Si pour une raison quelconque quelque chose a attiré mon regard pendant ce balayage visuel hautement ritualisé, je dois tout recommencer, ou alors quelqu’un mourra et des gens auront perdu pour toujours un membre de leur famille qu’ils aimaient et j’irai en prison. J’ai aussi rouvert beaucoup d’enveloppes, parce que j’avais peur qu’il y ait de la drogue dedans (de la drogue que je ne prends pas moi-même, allez donc savoir comment elle aurait atterri là, mais bref), ou du poison, ou une lettre confidentielle à propos d’un ami, ou alors il me fallait relire la carte postale encore pour être sûre que je n’avais pas écrit : « allez vous faire foutre bande de connards » à des gens que j’aime et que je respecte. Je ne peux pas poster des lettres sans me retourner pour vérifier que je ne les ai pas fait tomber à côté de la boîte.

Apprelez-moi folle si vous voulez, appelez-moi normale si vous préférez, dans les deux cas je m’en fous. J’ai des problèmes, comme on en a tous, et je jure que je n’accepterai plus jamais que la vie soit faite de cette longue chaîne de dégoût de soi, de honte et de culpabilité. Il y a tellement moyens de chercher de l’aide (médicale ou non, la littérature est géniale à cet égard par exemple, ou écouter les Spice Girls en mangeant des frites), alors soyez sûrs que vous trouverez l’aide qui vous convient à vous.

Top

Advertisements

Can I Have Both OCD and a Blog? What a Year of Blogging Has Taught Me

french flag pastel

I’ve been blogging for just over a year now. It may sound like nothing to some, but to me it’s a big deal. Launching a blog was a challenge. It still is. A great one. Now I know we all have our worries when we start to blog – or publish anything online, for that matter. In my case, however, most of the fears were depression- and OCD-related. I thought I’d tell you how much this experience reassured me, in the hope that it may reassure you too. Not necessarily to start a blog, but to open up to others, to face your fears and/or to dare try something new, even though you experience mental health issues.

Letting go: that was the hardest part. Having OCD sometimes coupled with depression, I have a real problem finishing things. I want to work on them over and over again. I find it easier to spend 200 more hours on a project than to actually say: ‘okay, I’m done now, that’s it! Let’s move on…’ Don’t get me wrong: I get tired, very tired indeed. Truth is, I can’t let things go, because I’m never truly satisfied. The reason why I probably loved school and assignments was that there were deadlines. That meant you had to let it go, whether you wanted it or not (I never wanted it). I need deadlines, or I’ll do two allnighters finishing something that’s already finished, or in other words, that never will be. So having a blog represented this huge challenge: I had no real reason to let go before each post: no boss telling me that I should, no lecturer telling me that my writing was overdue. I’d hit ‘publish’ on my own, and that would be it. Well, I’m glad to tell you that if you have OCD and the annoying depressive voice in your brain telling you that a certain piece of writing is crap, you can still one day learn to accept that while nothing will ever satisfy you as ‘finished’, you’ll be able to let it go.

Learning to finish things even though nothing is perfect – or even when there are typos and mistakes in your text: Before having this blog, I could beat myself up over a typo in a non-published article for weeks. Yes, that’s right, over a typo that maybe just my supervisor and a friend would see… Once, true story, I cried over the phone for two hours straight, since I noticed that there were a few typos in the footnotes of a document I had just submitted to my supervisor. I even imagined a plan to get the document and replace it with a new version in his pigeonhole before he arrived at work the next morning. Then I got paranoid about the fact that if the Uni realised I had changed the document, they would fire me and I could never do a PhD ever again, in any university of the world… Anyway, typos and mistakes drive me crazy. I always overreact to them. However, I’ve managed to publish all of these posts here, with and without intentional typos. I remember my psychologist telling me that, one day, I should try and send an email with an intentional typo. I burst into tears before him: ‘I will never be able toOoOoOoO!!!!!’. But that was true: it was a good idea, and I did it. Sometimes, I could only leave an intentional typo for ten minute. I was happy enough – it meant that I had accepted I could put something out there with a mistake, and not die instantly. And now, all the unintentional typos remain, because I don’t want to proofread my texts more than twice. If someone points out a typo, I’d very happily change it, but I won’t do what I did with that stupid thesis – read it about four times just to check commas and accents.

Virtual identity: a tricky one. Having a blog means going public, whether or not you are being honest or developing a new persona. For someone who cares far too much about what other people think, it’s a tough decision. Because just like in life – and again, this applies even if you lie or become someone else in your blog – some people will like you, most will be indifferent, and then some will dislike or hate you. Now I thought that having a blog was an additional difficulty to the whole ‘I care too much’ dilemma. Well, in fact, nothing really changed for me. You fear that people who dislike you will have even more reasons to dislike you – she’s insane, irresponsible, egocentric, etc. But are you sure they really were waiting for more reasons to think they were right? Most of the time, if someone doesn’t like you, you can change all you want, it won’t change until they change too, and accept another truth as being possible. Likewise, people who support you will support you even more if you do a blog or speak up online, as they can make their support public – but it probably means they were supporting you already, maybe they just didn’t know how to show it to you.

Structure: Having a blog gave me the structure I needed, both for depression and OCD. This isn’t true of all sorts of blogs, I believe, but I ensured that mine was supportive of me and – I hope – others. This meant that I refused to write something if only dark thoughts were coming to me. This helped me with my OCD related to responsibility and paranoia. I’m terrified that people could think less of themselves because of something I wrote. I imagine that someone will read a sad post, and immediately harm themselves or commit something irreversible. Yet writing, just as living, is a risk: you can’t decide how others will take it. So I put up a set of boundaries, and accepted that there were reasonable. I have a series of questions I ask myself at the end of each post, and if the post can positively answer most of them (have I been respectful of others in this piece? Have I shown empathy? Have I offered alternatives to dark thoughts?, etc.), then I publish it.

Structure (2): Structure is also present here in all its materialism. The problem is that I still have issues letting go, as I said above… For instance, to encourage me to come back even though I was scared, I wanted to post one screenshot a day, to show a predicted search on duckduckgo. I thought that was structured enough, and when I wouldn’t be able to, I’d just have to accept to skip one or two days… Well, turns out I can’t. I have published precisely 365 screenshots in each language throughout the year. When I couldn’t do one or two, I would do them later… And I couldn’t publish the ones that I was doing at the right time – because I still had these ‘previous ones’ waiting to be published, but it was not the correct day, dammit! That led me to sometimes post 20 screenshots in one go, because it took me all that time to catch up on myself. Anyway, I told you, it might sound like a very stupid problem, but it’s really hard for me. So I’ve decided that’s okay, since I’m not able to do that, I’ll change the structure. I need to get rid of those dates on the duckduckgo diary, and just publish predicted searches. But to make such a change, it had to be a symbolic date (I can’t implement change just whenever I feel like it, it needs to satisfy the very stubborn organisational side of my brain). So I changed after a full year, after day 365. Compromise, I think that’s what it’s called.


In summary, I’ve managed more than I thought I would, even though I still failed at some stuff. If there’s one thing I’ve discovered, it is that taking part in a public discourse can help you develop your resilience, and feel stronger when facing criticism – especially criticism coming from yourself.


Est-ce que je peux avoir des TOC et un blog? Ce que bloguer pendant un an m’a appris

Ça fait maintenant un an que je blogue. Ça peut sembler totalement dérisoire à certains, mais pour moi c’est un truc de dingue. Lancer un blog était un vrai défi. C’en est toujours un. Un défi énorme. Je sais qu’on a tous nos inquiétudes quand on commence un blog, ou quand on commence à poster des trucs sur internet. Dans mon cas, toutefois, la plupart de mes inquiétudes étaient liées à ma dépression ou à mes TOC. J’ai pensé que je pourrais peut-être vous dire à quel point cette expérience m’a rassurée, dans l’espoir que celui puisse aussi vous rassurer. Pas nécessairement dans le but de que vous-même vous mettiez à un blog, mais que vous vous sentiez rassurés pour vous ouvrir davantage aux autres, pour faire face à vos peurs et pour essayer quelque chose de nouveau, alors même que vous avez des problèmes plein la tête.

Lâcher prise : c’était l’élément le plus dur. Comme j’ai des TOC s’accompagnant parfois de dépression, j’ai un mal fou à finir les choses. Je voudrais travailler dessus encore et encore. Je trouve plus facile de passer 200 heures supplémentaires sur un projet plutôt que de dire : « d’accord, ça va maintenant, c’est bon c’est fini ! Passons à autre chose… » Comprenons-nous bien : ça me fatigue, bien sûr que ça me fatigue. Mais la vérité, c’est que je ne peux jamais lâcher prise car je ne suis jamais vraiment satisfaite. C’est certainement l’une des raisons pour lesquelles j’aimais l’école et les examens scolaires : il y avait une date (ou une heure) de rendu. Ça voulait dire qu’il fallait lâcher le morceau, qu’on le veuille ou non (moi c’était toujours non). J’ai besoin de dates butoirs, ou alors j’enchaîne deux nuits blanches pour finir un truc qui est déjà fini, ou, pour le dire autrement, un truc qui ne sera justement jamais fini. C’est pourquoi avoir un blog représentait un défi : je n’avais aucune vraie raison de lâcher prise avant chaque publication sur ce site : pas de chef qui me dise que je dois publier, pas de prof qui me dise que mon travail est en retard et que je dois me décider. Dans ce cas-là, ce serait de mon propre chef que je cliquerais sur « publier », et puis c’est tout. Eh bien, je suis ravie de vous dire que vous pouvez avoir des TOC et cette voix déprimante dans la tête vous disant que ce texte est tout pourri, vous pouvez tout de même un jour, même si vous ne serez jamais pleinement satisfait(e), accepter de lâcher prise.

Apprendre à finir quand quelque chose n’est pas absolument parfait – voire quand votre texte comporte des fautes : Avant d’avoir ce blog, je pouvais me torturer pour des fautes de frappe au sein d’un article non-publié pendant des semaines. Oui, c’est cela même, pour une faute que seulement mon directeur de thèse et peut-être un ami verraient. Une fois, j’ai pleuré pendant deux heures au téléphone sans m’arrêter parce que je m’étais rendu compte que j’avais fait quelques fautes dans des notes de bas de page, au sein d’un document que je venais de rendre à mon directeur. J’ai même commencé à imaginer un plan pour récupérer le document et le remplacer par une autre version dans son casier avant qu’il n’arrive au travail le lendemain matin. Puis je suis devenue paranoïaque, imaginant que si la fac s’apercevait que j’avais échangé les documents, ils me vireraient et que je serais interdite de thèse dans toutes les universités du monde. Bref, les fautes me rendent folle. Je réagis toujours de manière excessive face à elles. Pourtant, j’ai réussi à publier tous ces billets ici, avec et sans fautes volontaires. Je me rappelle mon psychologue me disant que je devrais un jour essayer d’envoyer un email avec une faute d’orthographe volontaire. J’ai éclaté en sanglots devant lui : « mais je pourrais jamaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis !!!!! » Mais il avait raison : c’était une bonne idée, et je l’ai fait. Des fois je ne pouvais laisser une faute volontaire que dix minutes. J’étais contente quand même, puisque ça signifiait que j’acceptais de poster un truc publiquement avec une faute, et que je n’en mourrais pas instantanément. Maintenant, toutes mes fautes involontaires restent là, parce que je ne veux pas relire mes textes plus de deux fois. Si quelqu’un me fait remarquer une faute, je suis très heureuse de la corriger, mais je ne ferai pas ce que j’ai fait avec cette stupide thèse : la lire quatre fois juste pour vérifier les virgules et les accents.

L’identité virtuelle : pas évidente. Tenir un blog implique de s’exprimer publiquement, que l’on soit honnête sur qui l’on est ou que l’on s’invente un personnage. Pour quelqu’un pour qui compte beaucoup trop le regard des autres, c’est une décision difficile. Parce que tout comme dans la vie (et encore une fois, je souligne que cela s’applique que l’on mente ou que l’on soit sincère) certains vous aimeront bien, la majorité vous seront indifférents et certains ne vous aimeront pas, voire vous détesteront. Je pensais donc qu’avoir un blog ajouterait une difficulté supplémentaire au côté « le jugement des autres compte beaucoup pour moi ». Mais en fait, rien n’a réellement changé. On craint que les gens qui ne nous aiment pas aient encore plus de raisons de nous détester – elle est tarée, irresponsable, égocentrique, etc. Mais êtes-vous sûrs que les gens qui ne vous aiment pas attendent vraiment d’autres exemples pour penser qu’ils ont raison ? La plupart du temps, si quelqu’un ne vous apprécie pas, vous pouvez changer du tout au tout, rien ne changera vraiment tant que ce quelqu’un n’aura pas changé lui-même, en acceptant qu’il puisse y avoir une autre vérité. Inversement, les gens qui vous soutiennent vous soutiendront d’autant plus quand vous vous exprimerez publiquement, puisqu’ils pourront eux aussi rendre leur soutien public. Mais ça veut certainement dire qu’ils vous soutenaient déjà, peut-être qu’ils ne savaient juste pas comment le montrer.

Structure : avoir un blog m’a donné la structure dont j’avais besoin, à la fois concernant la dépression et les TOC. Cela n’est pas vrai de toutes les formes de blog, il me semble, et c’est pourquoi j’ai fait en sorte de créer un espace qui m’aide, et qui, je l’espère, puisse aussi aider les autres. Ça signifie que je refusais de poster quelque chose si seulement des pensées noires me venaient en tête. Ce refus m’a aidé vis-à-vis de mon TOC lié à la responsabilité et à la paranoïa. J’ai terriblement peur que des gens se dévalorisent du fait de quelque chose que j’ai écrit. J’imagine que quelqu’un lira un billet triste, et se fera du mal ou commettra l’irréparable. Or écrire, tout comme vivre, est un risque : on ne peut pas décider de comment les autres le prendront. Alors j’ai mis en place certaines limites, que je considérais comme étant raisonnables. J’ai une série de questions que je me pose à la fin de chaque billet, et si ce billet peut répondre de manière affirmative à la plupart (ai-je fait preuve de respect envers les autres dans ce texte ? Ai-je fait preuve d’empathie ? Ai-je offert des alternatives aux pensées noires ?), alors je le publie.

Structure (2) : la structure est également là dans toute sa matérialité. Le souci ici c’est que j’ai du mal à lâcher le morceau, comme je l’ai dit plus haut… Par exemple, afin de m’encourager à revenir sur le blog même en ayant peur, je voulais publier une capture d’écran par jour, pour montrer une recherche sur duckduckgo. Je pensais que c’était suffisamment structuré, et qu’ainsi quand je ne pourrais pas le faire un jour ou deux, j’accepterais simplement de sauter quelques jours. Bon, ben il se trouve que je ne peux pas. J’ai publié précisément 365 captures d’écran dans chaque langue au cours de l’année. Quand j’en manquais une ou deux, je les faisais plus tard… et je ne pouvais donc pas publier celles du bon jour, du jour actuel, puisque j’avais encore les précédentes à publier, mais que ce n’était plus le jour correspondant, bordel ! Cela m’a amenée à parfois publier 20 captures d’écran de suite, parce que c’est le temps qu’il me fallait pour me rattraper moi-même. Bref, je vous avais bien dit que cela pouvait paraître idiot, mais je trouve ça vraiment difficile. Alors j’ai décidé que d’accord, puisque je ne supportais pas ça, j’allais changer de structure. J’ai besoin de virer ces dates du journal duckduckgo, et de simplement publier des recherches internet. Mais pour que je puisse faire ce changement, il fallait que ça soit une date symbolique (je ne peux pas faire de changement juste quand ça me chante, parce que cela doit obéir à cette partie têtue du cerveau qu’est la tendance à l’organisation). J’ai donc appliqué ce changement après une année complète, précisément 365 jours. Un compromis, je crois que c’est comme ça que ça s’appelle.


Pour résumer, j’ai réussi à faire plus que je ne l’aurais cru, même si j’échoue encore à certaines choses. S’il y a une chose que cette expérience bloguesque m’a apprise, c’est que participer à la parole publique peut aider à renforcer notre capacité à la résilience, et à nous sentir plus fort quand on doit faire face aux critiques – en particulier celles qui viennent de nous-mêmes.

Top