Can I Have Both OCD and a Blog? What a Year of Blogging Has Taught Me

french flag pastel

I’ve been blogging for just over a year now. It may sound like nothing to some, but to me it’s a big deal. Launching a blog was a challenge. It still is. A great one. Now I know we all have our worries when we start to blog – or publish anything online, for that matter. In my case, however, most of the fears were depression- and OCD-related. I thought I’d tell you how much this experience reassured me, in the hope that it may reassure you too. Not necessarily to start a blog, but to open up to others, to face your fears and/or to dare try something new, even though you experience mental health issues.

Letting go: that was the hardest part. Having OCD sometimes coupled with depression, I have a real problem finishing things. I want to work on them over and over again. I find it easier to spend 200 more hours on a project than to actually say: ‘okay, I’m done now, that’s it! Let’s move on…’ Don’t get me wrong: I get tired, very tired indeed. Truth is, I can’t let things go, because I’m never truly satisfied. The reason why I probably loved school and assignments was that there were deadlines. That meant you had to let it go, whether you wanted it or not (I never wanted it). I need deadlines, or I’ll do two allnighters finishing something that’s already finished, or in other words, that never will be. So having a blog represented this huge challenge: I had no real reason to let go before each post: no boss telling me that I should, no lecturer telling me that my writing was overdue. I’d hit ‘publish’ on my own, and that would be it. Well, I’m glad to tell you that if you have OCD and the annoying depressive voice in your brain telling you that a certain piece of writing is crap, you can still one day learn to accept that while nothing will ever satisfy you as ‘finished’, you’ll be able to let it go.

Learning to finish things even though nothing is perfect – or even when there are typos and mistakes in your text: Before having this blog, I could beat myself up over a typo in a non-published article for weeks. Yes, that’s right, over a typo that maybe just my supervisor and a friend would see… Once, true story, I cried over the phone for two hours straight, since I noticed that there were a few typos in the footnotes of a document I had just submitted to my supervisor. I even imagined a plan to get the document and replace it with a new version in his pigeonhole before he arrived at work the next morning. Then I got paranoid about the fact that if the Uni realised I had changed the document, they would fire me and I could never do a PhD ever again, in any university of the world… Anyway, typos and mistakes drive me crazy. I always overreact to them. However, I’ve managed to publish all of these posts here, with and without intentional typos. I remember my psychologist telling me that, one day, I should try and send an email with an intentional typo. I burst into tears before him: ‘I will never be able toOoOoOoO!!!!!’. But that was true: it was a good idea, and I did it. Sometimes, I could only leave an intentional typo for ten minute. I was happy enough – it meant that I had accepted I could put something out there with a mistake, and not die instantly. And now, all the unintentional typos remain, because I don’t want to proofread my texts more than twice. If someone points out a typo, I’d very happily change it, but I won’t do what I did with that stupid thesis – read it about four times just to check commas and accents.

Virtual identity: a tricky one. Having a blog means going public, whether or not you are being honest or developing a new persona. For someone who cares far too much about what other people think, it’s a tough decision. Because just like in life – and again, this applies even if you lie or become someone else in your blog – some people will like you, most will be indifferent, and then some will dislike or hate you. Now I thought that having a blog was an additional difficulty to the whole ‘I care too much’ dilemma. Well, in fact, nothing really changed for me. You fear that people who dislike you will have even more reasons to dislike you – she’s insane, irresponsible, egocentric, etc. But are you sure they really were waiting for more reasons to think they were right? Most of the time, if someone doesn’t like you, you can change all you want, it won’t change until they change too, and accept another truth as being possible. Likewise, people who support you will support you even more if you do a blog or speak up online, as they can make their support public – but it probably means they were supporting you already, maybe they just didn’t know how to show it to you.

Structure: Having a blog gave me the structure I needed, both for depression and OCD. This isn’t true of all sorts of blogs, I believe, but I ensured that mine was supportive of me and – I hope – others. This meant that I refused to write something if only dark thoughts were coming to me. This helped me with my OCD related to responsibility and paranoia. I’m terrified that people could think less of themselves because of something I wrote. I imagine that someone will read a sad post, and immediately harm themselves or commit something irreversible. Yet writing, just as living, is a risk: you can’t decide how others will take it. So I put up a set of boundaries, and accepted that there were reasonable. I have a series of questions I ask myself at the end of each post, and if the post can positively answer most of them (have I been respectful of others in this piece? Have I shown empathy? Have I offered alternatives to dark thoughts?, etc.), then I publish it.

Structure (2): Structure is also there in all its materialism. The problem there is that I still have issues letting go, as I said above… For instance, to encourage me to come back even though I was scared, I wanted to post one screenshot a day, to show a predicted search on duckduckgo. I thought that was structured enough, and when I wouldn’t be able to, I’d just have to accept to skip one or two days… Well, turns out I can’t. I have published precisely 365 screenshots in each language throughout the year. When I couldn’t do one or two, I would do them later… And I couldn’t publish the ones that I was doing at the right time – because I still had these ‘previous ones’ waiting to be published, but it was not the correct day, dammit! That led me to sometimes post 20 screenshots in one go, because it took me all that time to catch up on myself. Anyway, I told you, it might sound like a very stupid problem, but it’s really hard for me. So I’ve decided that’s okay, since I’m not able to do that, I’ll change the structure. I need to get rid of those dates on the duckduckgo diary, and just publish predicted searches. But to make such a change, it had to be a symbolic date (I can’t implement change just whenever I feel like it, it needs to satisfy the very stubborn organisational side of my brain). So I changed after a full year, after day 365. Compromise, I think that’s what it’s called.


In summary, I’ve managed more than I thought I would, even though I still failed at some stuff. If there’s one thing I’ve discovered, it is that taking part in a public discourse can help you develop your resilience, and feel stronger when facing criticism – especially criticism coming from yourself.


Est-ce que je peux avoir des TOC et un blog? Ce que bloguer pendant un an m’a appris

Ça fait maintenant un an que je blogue. Ça peut sembler totalement dérisoire à certains, mais pour moi c’est un truc de dingue. Lancer un blog était un vrai défi. C’en est toujours un. Un défi énorme. Je sais qu’on a tous nos inquiétudes quand on commence un blog, ou quand on commence à poster des trucs sur internet. Dans mon cas, toutefois, la plupart de mes inquiétudes étaient liées à ma dépression ou à mes TOC. J’ai pensé que je pourrais peut-être vous dire à quel point cette expérience m’a rassurée, dans l’espoir que celui puisse aussi vous rassurer. Pas nécessairement dans le but de que vous-même vous mettiez à un blog, mais que vous vous sentiez rassurés pour vous ouvrir davantage aux autres, pour faire face à vos peurs et pour essayer quelque chose de nouveau, alors même que vous avez des problèmes plein la tête.

Lâcher prise : c’était l’élément le plus dur. Comme j’ai des TOC s’accompagnant parfois de dépression, j’ai un mal fou à finir les choses. Je voudrais travailler dessus encore et encore. Je trouve plus facile de passer 200 heures supplémentaires sur un projet plutôt que de dire : « d’accord, ça va maintenant, c’est bon c’est fini ! Passons à autre chose… » Comprenons-nous bien : ça me fatigue, bien sûr que ça me fatigue. Mais la vérité, c’est que je ne peux jamais lâcher prise car je ne suis jamais vraiment satisfaite. C’est certainement l’une des raisons pour lesquelles j’aimais l’école et les examens scolaires : il y avait une date (ou une heure) de rendu. Ça voulait dire qu’il fallait lâcher le morceau, qu’on le veuille ou non (moi c’était toujours non). J’ai besoin de dates butoirs, ou alors j’enchaîne deux nuits blanches pour finir un truc qui est déjà fini, ou, pour le dire autrement, un truc qui ne sera justement jamais fini. C’est pourquoi avoir un blog représentait un défi : je n’avais aucune vraie raison de lâcher prise avant chaque publication sur ce site : pas de chef qui me dise que je dois publier, pas de prof qui me dise que mon travail est en retard et que je dois me décider. Dans ce cas-là, ce serait de mon propre chef que je cliquerais sur « publier », et puis c’est tout. Eh bien, je suis ravie de vous dire que vous pouvez avoir des TOC et cette voix déprimante dans la tête vous disant que ce texte est tout pourri, vous pouvez tout de même un jour, même si vous ne serez jamais pleinement satisfait(e), accepter de lâcher prise.

Apprendre à finir quand quelque chose n’est pas absolument parfait – voire quand votre texte comporte des fautes : Avant d’avoir ce blog, je pouvais me torturer pour des fautes de frappe au sein d’un article non-publié pendant des semaines. Oui, c’est cela même, pour une faute que seulement mon directeur de thèse et peut-être un ami verraient. Une fois, j’ai pleuré pendant deux heures au téléphone sans m’arrêter parce que je m’étais rendu compte que j’avais fait quelques fautes dans des notes de bas de page, au sein d’un document que je venais de rendre à mon directeur. J’ai même commencé à imaginer un plan pour récupérer le document et le remplacer par une autre version dans son casier avant qu’il n’arrive au travail le lendemain matin. Puis je suis devenue paranoïaque, imaginant que si la fac s’apercevait que j’avais échangé les documents, ils me vireraient et que je serais interdite de thèse dans toutes les universités du monde. Bref, les fautes me rendent folle. Je réagis toujours de manière excessive face à elles. Pourtant, j’ai réussi à publier tous ces billets ici, avec et sans fautes volontaires. Je me rappelle mon psychologue me disant que je devrais un jour essayer d’envoyer un email avec une faute d’orthographe volontaire. J’ai éclaté en sanglots devant lui : « mais je pourrais jamaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis !!!!! » Mais il avait raison : c’était une bonne idée, et je l’ai fait. Des fois je ne pouvais laisser une faute volontaire que dix minutes. J’étais contente quand même, puisque ça signifiait que j’acceptais de poster un truc publiquement avec une faute, et que je n’en mourrais pas instantanément. Maintenant, toutes mes fautes involontaires restent là, parce que je ne veux pas relire mes textes plus de deux fois. Si quelqu’un me fait remarquer une faute, je suis très heureuse de la corriger, mais je ne ferai pas ce que j’ai fait avec cette stupide thèse : la lire quatre fois juste pour vérifier les virgules et les accents.

L’identité virtuelle : pas évidente. Tenir un blog implique de s’exprimer publiquement, que l’on soit honnête sur qui l’on est ou que l’on s’invente un personnage. Pour quelqu’un pour qui compte beaucoup trop le regard des autres, c’est une décision difficile. Parce que tout comme dans la vie (et encore une fois, je souligne que cela s’applique que l’on mente ou que l’on soit sincère) certains vous aimeront bien, la majorité vous seront indifférents et certains ne vous aimeront pas, voire vous détesteront. Je pensais donc qu’avoir un blog ajouterait une difficulté supplémentaire au côté « le jugement des autres compte beaucoup pour moi ». Mais en fait, rien n’a réellement changé. On craint que les gens qui ne nous aiment pas aient encore plus de raisons de nous détester – elle est tarée, irresponsable, égocentrique, etc. Mais êtes-vous sûrs que les gens qui ne vous aiment pas attendent vraiment d’autres exemples pour penser qu’ils ont raison ? La plupart du temps, si quelqu’un ne vous apprécie pas, vous pouvez changer du tout au tout, rien ne changera vraiment tant que ce quelqu’un n’aura pas changé lui-même, en acceptant qu’il puisse y avoir une autre vérité. Inversement, les gens qui vous soutiennent vous soutiendront d’autant plus quand vous vous exprimerez publiquement, puisqu’ils pourront eux aussi rendre leur soutien public. Mais ça veut certainement dire qu’ils vous soutenaient déjà, peut-être qu’ils ne savaient juste pas comment le montrer.

Structure : avoir un blog m’a donné la structure dont j’avais besoin, à la fois concernant la dépression et les TOC. Cela n’est pas vrai de toutes les formes de blog, il me semble, et c’est pourquoi j’ai fait en sorte de créer un espace qui m’aide, et qui, je l’espère, puisse aussi aider les autres. Ça signifie que je refusais de poster quelque chose si seulement des pensées noires me venaient en tête. Ce refus m’a aidé vis-à-vis de mon TOC lié à la responsabilité et à la paranoïa. J’ai terriblement peur que des gens se dévalorisent du fait de quelque chose que j’ai écrit. J’imagine que quelqu’un lira un billet triste, et se fera du mal ou commettra l’irréparable. Or écrire, tout comme vivre, est un risque : on ne peut pas décider de comment les autres le prendront. Alors j’ai mis en place certaines limites, que je considérais comme étant raisonnables. J’ai une série de questions que je me pose à la fin de chaque billet, et si ce billet peut répondre de manière affirmative à la plupart (ai-je fait preuve de respect envers les autres dans ce texte ? Ai-je fait preuve d’empathie ? Ai-je offert des alternatives aux pensées noires ?), alors je le publie.

Structure (2) : la structure est également là dans toute sa matérialité. Le souci ici c’est que j’ai du mal à lâcher le morceau, comme je l’ai dit plus haut… Par exemple, afin de m’encourager à revenir sur le blog même en ayant peur, je voulais publier une capture d’écran par jour, pour montrer une recherche sur duckduckgo. Je pensais que c’était suffisamment structuré, et qu’ainsi quand je ne pourrais pas le faire un jour ou deux, j’accepterais simplement de sauter quelques jours. Bon, ben il se trouve que je ne peux pas. J’ai publié précisément 365 captures d’écran dans chaque langue au cours de l’année. Quand j’en manquais une ou deux, je les faisais plus tard… et je ne pouvais donc pas publier celles du bon jour, du jour actuel, puisque j’avais encore les précédentes à publier, mais que ce n’était plus le jour correspondant, bordel ! Cela m’a amenée à parfois publier 20 captures d’écran de suite, parce que c’est le temps qu’il me fallait pour me rattraper moi-même. Bref, je vous avais bien dit que cela pouvait paraître idiot, mais je trouve ça vraiment difficile. Alors j’ai décidé que d’accord, puisque je ne supportais pas ça, j’allais changer de structure. J’ai besoin de virer ces dates du journal duckduckgo, et de simplement publier des recherches internet. Mais pour que je puisse faire ce changement, il fallait que ça soit une date symbolique (je ne peux pas faire de changement juste quand ça me chante, parce que cela doit obéir à cette partie têtue du cerveau qu’est la tendance à l’organisation). J’ai donc appliqué ce changement après une année complète, précisément 365 jours. Un compromis, je crois que c’est comme ça que ça s’appelle.


Pour résumer, j’ai réussi à faire plus que je ne l’aurais cru, même si j’échoue encore à certaines choses. S’il y a une chose que cette expérience bloguesque m’a apprise, c’est que participer à la parole publique peut aider à renforcer notre capacité à la résilience, et à nous sentir plus fort quand on doit faire face aux critiques – en particulier celles qui viennent de nous-mêmes.

Top

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s