Taking Care of Others While Taking Care of Yourself: Interacting with Someone Living with Mental Health Issues

french flag pastel

It can come as a surprise, but people living with mental health issues may fear mean and judgmental people almost as much as they fear nice and kind people

Wait… whaaat??? I get why they fear mean people, I hear some of you say, but why on earth would they fear kind people, especially if they need help and support?!

Here are a few reasons why:

1. Because mental health issues often provoke a dramatic raise in guilt. Someone who’s depressed, for instance, may think they’re worthless. Then, when they see kind people giving some of their time to help them, going the extra mile to make them happy… They feel even more worthless, because they think that now not only are they wasting their own time, but they’re wasting their friends’ time and energy too.

2. Because kind people, precisely because they’re kind, are the ones who fear they don’t do things right. Even more so, if their friend is fragile or sick. Someone with depression may know enough about the lack of self-esteem to not wish their friends consistent doubt and self-deprecation. So by avoiding them, they try to not overburden them.

3. Because there’s a huge difference between support, empathy, compassion, and pity. When people want to talk, they don’t necessarily want to whine… Or to say it in other words, they don’t necessarily think they have the worst situation in the world, and they know that anybody could see that. They fear that someone will either go: ‘but how can you not realise you’re very privileged??? You’re so selfish!’(judgmental people), or: ‘oh dear, you’re right, it must be so terribly difficult to be you… I don’t even know how you do it…’ (kind people)

4. Because, well, living with mental health issues certainly doesn’t mean that you’re a kind person yourself. What’s more, these issues can make you irritable, aggressive, self-centered, disrespectful and insensitive at times. So you just want to be left alone as you feel the anger build on.

These are just a few reasons why people living with mental health issues may appear to be avoiding kind people, sometimes.
But then… What can nice people do?

First of all, you can do what you do. That is, if you’re kind and caring, most chances are: what you’re doing is right. Not because you’d get an A+ in a caring-for-friends class, but because there’s no real recipe for doing things right. So amazing news: relax, you’re probably doing a great job, and thanks so much for caring for your friends and/or relatives. You should never need to sacrifice everything you are to help someone. On the contrary, I think it’ll make you… more you.

Second of all, you must always – let me repeat that louder for emphasis – YOU MUST ALWAYS protect and take care of yourself. Firstly because if you’re not well, it’s going to be harder and harder to help others get better. Secondly because your friends and family surely care for your own well-being, but they may be too tired, obsessed or depressed to take notice of mood swings, or any other symptoms which might indicate your own level of stress and anxiety. Thirdly, because you deserve to take care of yourself, and there’s no situation (yep, not a single one) when it is acceptable for someone living with mental health issues to hurt you. I’m not saying you couldn’t understand, maybe you do, and maybe you forgive – that’s your business. But it doesn’t make it okay.

So how do you take care of yourself while caring for someone? Here are a few suggestions.

You can show empathy. That doesn’t mean you have to agree all the time. Let me give you an example. I used to panic when I needed to go outside. Especially if I needed to leave the building on my own. Empathy was what was offered to me by these great friends and relatives around me: ‘yes, I know it’s hard, I can see how much you want to stay in to avoid feeling so scared and threatened’. Nonetheless they still didn’t agree with me, on the view that the world was so scary we’d better forever stay in: ‘but you have to go out. Look, you’ll take our time, but you’ll go.’ They didn’t dismiss what I felt. They didn’t say: ‘you bitch, can’t you see that the light is off? Stop being a fucking moron, you’ve checked the door for ten minutes already, just come in the car or I swear I’ll leave without you!’


Showing empathy doesn’t – does never mean that you should accept everything. There are two main reasons for this;

1. Accepting anything and everything can put you at risk. You could develop your own mental health issues. For instance, someone needs to be constantly reassured (for instance? Me, to some extent…) But to reassure them, you may have to enter a whole different way of thinking, to adopt their point of view. And not for a moment, as it is the case with empathy. But forever. OCD is a brilliant example of this. I feel so much better when someone reassures me. I’d like to spend my days with ten people following me around, assuring me after each action that I have indeed done it: ‘Yes, you’ve locked the door’, ‘yes, the gas is off’, ‘no, you haven’t killed anyone on the way to work’, ‘no, you didn’t say anything nasty to that person, you just said: thank you, have a good day’, ‘yes, the letter was indeed in the envelope, no you don’t need to call the post office to ask them to check’. To someone who’s really resistant to OCD, that’s okay. Now if someone is a bit insecure, I could easily pass on my anxiety to them. It doesn’t mean they would develop OCD, but they can become slave to these rituals, or feel like they’re in charge of protecting me (and they shouldn’t be, because they aren’t). The key is to be able to find a way out when necessary: that’s the difference between someone living with OCD and someone who doesn’t. I need my rituals. I can’t escape them. When I can’t perform them, I do magical thinking instead, I count in my head, etc. Someone without OCD must be able to tell me one day, if they feel like it: ‘sorry, today I can’t reassure you. This is overwhelming, so why don’t we just take a break? Apart from my direct vocal reassurance, what would make you feel better and safer? To be given more time? Fair enough, we can leave later!’ You get the idea. They key is always: I might be helping someone… but do I have a way out when things are overwhelming for me too? Someone or something I can turn myself to?

2. Accepting everything can hurt your feelings. Very much so. It’s common to find, in questionnaires rating the level of depression, a question along the lines of: do you feel more irritable? Have you been more aggressive towards your relatives recently? Do you feel angrier than usual? And also: have you been violent during the past month? Because we must face it one and for all: depression and mental health issues can make us forget about consequences, and about others. It’s tragic, but that’s the truth. And is it that surprising really, when you think that absolutely everyone, every single one of us, has already said in their lives something they didn’t really mean, just because they were upset? Now how about feeling like this constantly? Some people self-sabotage their relationships because they think they’re not worth the help or support they’re receiving. Sometimes, they sabotage relationships because they can’t even think without negative or dark thoughts. So of course their words will reflect this darkness. So what do you do? Well, first of all, remember that any form of violence or manipulation is unacceptable, and that to help someone doesn’t mean to accept everything they say they need. Mind you: they may indeed need it, but you’re under no obligation to provide it. The key here is to never break the communication, as well as not taking things personally. For instance, your partner has been really grumpy for days. Yet you’ve done everything to make them feel better. They still don’t seem to be improving. Well, you have all rights to tell them. Tell them that you hope what you’re doing is helping. If they say that it isn’t, don’t think they’re telling you you’re just useless. They may say that because of the guilt (see above): they’ve noticed that they’re not improving even though you’re doing so much for them, so they feel even more miserable for making you go through all this. They might even say: ‘don’t bother! Nothing helps me anyway!’ They’re not saying that you can’t help, but rather that they don’t know how. To improve, help and support sadly aren’t sufficient. One needs to change their way of thinking. And it’s a long, painful process, not driven only by our own decision-making. If they could think: ‘okay then, I’ll be better tomorrow’, trust me, they’ll do it. They just don’t know how… yet. So keep asking whenever you feel like it: is there anything I can do? And thank you for trying.

However, things can seem very personal sometimes. Aimed at you specifically. You partner screaming at you: ‘why are you always so needy anyway? I don’t care about your work party, actually I never have! Your work is shit and your colleagues are assholes! Go on your own, I don’t care what they’ll say! In that case, whatever the issue your partner or friend is having, you need to tell them that they can’t speak to you like this. Don’t scream back, just explain that you can understand that they wouldn’t want to come if they don’t feel well, but that they shouldn’t say it in such an aggressive way. Because hearing these sorts of things over and over again can also destroy your own self-esteem, and you need it. And you deserve it. Period.


So really, what I guess I’m trying to say is that being kind and supportive doesn’t mean doing everything someone asks you to do. They may not realise how much they ask from you. Talk together. And take moments for yourself. To take a step back, and consider how you feel with your own self.

I’ll finish with an anecdote. Once, in a library, I went to the toilets. A woman there was crying like I’ve rarely seen someone cry. I didn’t know what to do, so I was still hesitant as I was washing my hands. Maybe I even went out of the room and came back, I can’t remember. Anyway the thing is, I eventually asked her: ‘are you okay? Can I help?’ She yelled: ‘Fuck off! I didn’t ask for your help, mind you own business!’ I was terrified. I was shaking all over. I left, and it took me more than an hour to make sense of that scene. Even though it was shocking, I finally put some sense into it. Given the pain (or whatever emotion) this person was going through, no wonder it would have been hard for her to interact with me in any sort of way. I stopped wondering what she may have thought (oh my god, maybe it’s because I hesitated, she thought I didn’t care? Oh god maybe it’s because I seemed inquisitive, she felt threatened…? Oh my god, etc.). Instead, I realised that even though it wasn’t the best moment in my life (no one likes to be talked to that way), it certainly wasn’t her best either. And from regretting to have talked her, I went to being glad that I did. It’s not necessary the immediate outcome that counts. But the fact that maybe one day, someone will ask, and then, she will answer.


Prendre soin des autres tout en prenant soin de soi : communiquer avec quelqu’un vivant une dépression ou des problèmes psychologiques

Ça peut surprendre, mais les gens qui vivent avec des problèmes d’ordre psychologique peuvent craindre les gens méchants-qui-jugent presqu’autant que les gens gentils-qui-aident…

Attends… quoi ??? J’en entends certains de vous dire: je comprends pourquoi ils craignent les gens qui jugent, mais pourquoi craindraient-ils des gens bienveillants? Surtout s’ils ont besoin d’aide ?!


Voici donc quelques réponses possibles:

1. Parce que les problèmes d’ordre psychologique provoquent souvent une explosion de culpabilité. Quelqu’un qui vit avec une dépression, par exemple, peut penser qu’il ne vaut rien. Alors quand il voit des gens bienveillants donner de leur temps pour l’aider, et faire des efforts notables pour le rendre heureux… Il peut se sentir encore plus dénué de toute valeur, parce que non seulement il pense qu’il perd lui-même son temps à essayer d’aller mieux, mais en plus, voici que maintenant ses amis aussi perdent leur temps pour quelqu’un sans valeur comme lui.

2. Parce que les gens gentils, précisément parce qu’ils sont gentils, ont peur de mal faire les choses. D’autant plus si leur ami est fragile ou malade. Quelqu’un avec une dépression en sait certainement assez sur le manque d’estime de soi pour ne pas vouloir imposer à ses amis le doute constant, et l’auto-dénigrement. Alors en les évitant, il tente de ne pas ajouter ce fardeau-là.

3. Parce qu’il y a une différence de taille entre le soutien, l’empathie, la compassion, et la pitié. Quand les gens ont besoin de parler, ça ne veut pas forcément dire qu’ils veulent pleurnicher. Pour le dire autrement, il ne pensent pas forcément être dans la pire situation au monde, et ils se rendent bien compte que tout le monde le sait bien. Ils craignent alors qu’on leur dise soit : « mais enfin, tu ne vois pas à quel point tu es privilégié ??? T’es tellement égoiste ! » (les gens qui jugent), soit : « oh oui, tu as raison, ça doit être tellement difficile d’être toi… je ne sais même pas comment tu fais… » (les gens gentils)

4. Parce que vivre en ayant des problèmes d’ordre psychologique n’implique pas forcément qu’on est gentil soi-même. Ces soucis peuvent même rendre irritable, agressif, égocentrique, parfois même irrespectueux et sans tact. Alors on peut préférer être seul quand on sent monter la colère.

Voilà juste quelques-unes des raisons pour lesquelles les gens ayant des problèmes d’ordre psychologique paraissent parfois éviter les gens bienveillants.
Mais alors, que peuvent faire ces gens bienveillants ?


Premièrement, vous pouvez faire ce que vous faites. C’est-à-dire que si vous êtes bienveillant et attentionné, il y a des chances pour que ce que vous fassiez déjà soit très bien. Pas parce qu’on vous donnerait forcément un 20/20 en cours de prendre-soin-des-copains, mais parce qu’il n’y a pas de vraie recette pour faire les choses bien. C’est donc une bonne nouvelle : détendez-vous, vous faites sûrement des choses super, et merci, merci infiniment de prendre soin de vos amis et/ou des membres de votre famille. On ne devrait jamais avoir besoin de sacrifier tout ce que l’on est pour aider quelqu’un. Au contraire, j’ai tendance à penser que les aider fait simplement ressortir ce qui fonde une personne.

Deuxièmement, vous devez toujours (laissez-moi répéter ça un peu plus fort histoire qu’on perçoive bien l’importance de la chose) VOUS DEVEZ TOUJOURS vous protégez vous-même et prendre soin de vous. D’abord parce que si vous ne vous sentez pas bien, il deviendra de plus en plus dur de faire en sorte que les autres aillent mieux. Ensuite parce que votre propre bien-être compte sûrement beaucoup vos amis et votre famille, mais qu’ils peuvent être trop fatigués, obsédés par une idée ou déprimés pour remarquer vos sautes d’humeurs, ou tout autre symptôme indiquant votre niveau de stress ou d’anxiété. Enfin, parce que vous méritez de prendre soin de vous, et parce qu’en aucun cas (oui, dans aucun cas possible ou imaginable) il n’est acceptable que quelqu’un qui vivent avec des problèmes d’ordre psychologique vous fasse du mal. Je ne dis pas qu’on ne peut pas comprendre, ni qu’on ne peut pas pardonner : ça, c’est à vous de voir, c’est votre affaire. Mais ça ne le rend pas acceptable pour autant.

Alors comment prendre soin de soi tout en prenant soin des autres? Voici quelques suggestions.

Vous pouvez faire preuve d’empathie. Ce qui ne veut pas dire que vous devez être toujours d’accord avec la personne. Laissez-moi vous donner un exemple. Il fut un temps où je paniquais complètement à l’idée d’aller dehors, de sortir de chez moi. Surtout si je devais quitter la maison toute seule. L’empathie, c’est que m’ont donné de formidables amis et de tout aussi formidables membres de ma famille : « oui, je sais que c’est dur, je vois bien à quel point tu veux rester à l’intérieur pour ne pas avoir si peur, et te sentir si menacée. » Pour autant, ils ne me donnaient pas raison, non ils n’adhéraient pas pour autant à ma vision du monde, qui faisait le monde extérieur si effrayant qu’il me fallait toujours rester chez moi : « mais il faut que tu sortes. T’inquiète, prends ton temps, mais il te faudra sortir. » Ils ne niaient pas ce que je ressentais. Ils ne disaient pas : « mais enfin connasse, tu le vois pas que la lumière est éteinte ? Arrête d’être débile, ça fait déjà dix minutes que tu vérifies la porte, viens dans la voiture ou je te jure je pars sans toi ! »


Faire preuve d’empathie ne signifie pas – ne signifie même jamais – tout accepter. Deux raisons majeures à cela :

1. Accepter tout et n’importe quoi peut vous mettre en danger. Vous pourriez bien en effet développer vos propres problèmes d’ordre psychologique. Par exemple, imaginons quelqu’un qui a constamment besoin d’être rassuré (par exemple ? moi, dans une certaine mesure…). Mais pour les rassurer, on a parfois besoin de pénétrer dans une toute autre logique de pensée, d’accepter un autre point de vue : le leur (exemple: le mien…). Et pas seulement pour un moment défini, comme c’est le cas pour l’empathie. Mais pour toujours. Les TOC en sont un très bon exemple. Je me sens tellement mieux quand quelqu’un me rassure. J’aimerais passer mes jours accompagnée en permanence de dix personnes, et m’assurant après chacun de mes actes que je l’ai bien fait : « oui, tu as fermé la porte », « oui, tu as fermé le gaz », « non, tu n’as tué personne en allant au travail », « non, tu n’as rien dit de déplacé à cette personne, tu lui as juste dit : merci, passez une bonne journée », « oui, la lettre était bien dans l’enveloppe, non il n’y a pas besoin d’appeler le bureau de poste pour leur demander de vérifier ». Pour quelqu’un de résistant aux TOC, ce n’est pas grave. Mais si ce quelqu’un est lui-même susceptible de douter beaucoup, si lui-même est incertain, je peux facilement lui transmettre mon angoisse. Cela ne signifie pas qu’il développera des TOC lui-même, mais il peut devenir esclave de ces rituels, ou ressentir un devoir de protection envers moi (alors que non, ça n’est pas son rôle). La clé, c’est de pouvoir toujours trouver une porte de sortie quand cela est nécessaire ; c’est en effet la différence entre quelqu’un qui a des TOC, et quelqu’un qui n’en a pas. J’ai besoin de mes rituels. Je ne peux leur échapper. Même quand j’essaie de ne pas y succomber, alors je pratique la pensée magique, je compte dans ma tête, etc. Quelqu’un qui n’a pas de TOC doit être capable de me dire un jour, s’il en a envie ou besoin : « désolé, mais aujourd’hui je ne peux pas te rassurer. C’est trop pour moi en ce moment, alors si on faisait une pause ? A part le fait que je te rassure, qu’est-ce qui pourrait t’aider à te sentir mieux, à te sentir en sécurité ? Que tu prennes plus de temps? Pas de souci, on peut partir plus tard!” Vous voyez le genre. La clé, c’est de se souvenir de ça: d’accord, j’aide quelqu’un, peut-être, mais est-ce que j’ai moi aussi une issue de secours quand les choses me pèsent trop, quand la situation me dépasse ? Quelqu’un ou quelque chose vers qui / vers laquelle je peux me tourner ?

2. Tout accepter peut vous faire très mal. Emotionnellement, c’est très dur à porter. Les questionnaires visant à mesurer le niveau d’une dépression contiennent très souvent des questions du style : vous sentez-vous plus irritable, plus énervé ? Vous êtes-vous montré plus agressif envers vos proches récemment ? Vous sentez-vous davantage en colère ? Et aussi : vous êtes-vous montré violent durant ce dernier mois ? Parce qu’il faut bien regarder la réalité en face une fois pour toutes : dépression et moral atteint peuvent nous conduire à oublier les conséquences, et à oublier les autres. C’est tragique, mais c’est comme ça. Franchement, est-ce si surprenant, quand on réalise que chacun d’entre nous a déjà dit quelque chose qu’il ne pensait pas réellement, quelque chose qu’il aurait préféré ne pas dire, simplement parce qu’il était triste ou vexé ? Qu’est-ce que ça donnerait, alors, de se sentir comme ça en permanence ? Certains sabordent leurs relations parce qu’ils pensent n’être pas dignes de l’aide qu’on leur apporte, ne pas mériter ce soutien-là. Parfois, ils sabordent leurs relations car ils ne parviennent pas même à penser hors idées noires. Alors évidemment que leurs mots reflètent cette noirceur-là. On fait quoi alors? Hé bien d’abord souvenez-vous que toute forme de violence ou de manipulation est inacceptable, et qu’aider quelqu’un ne signifie pas accepter tout ce dont la personne dit avoir besoin. Qu’on se comprenne bien : ne pensez pas qu’elle vous ment, elle peut effectivement avoir besoin de ce qu’elle vous demande ; mais vous n’avez aucune obligation de le lui fournir. La clé ici (bon je me rends compte que ça fait déjà un fameux trousseau…) est de ne jamais rompre la communication, et de ne pas prendre les choses personnellement. Par exemple, votre partenaire râle et s’énerve facilement depuis plusieurs jours. Pourtant vous avez tout fait pour l’aider à se sentir mieux. La situation ne semble pas s’améliorer. Vous avez tous les droits de le dire. Dites-lui que vous espérez que ce que vous faites l’aide. S’il dit que ça ne l’aide pas, n’interprétez pas ça comme un : « tu ne sers à rien ». Il pourrait bien dire cela du fait de sa culpabilité (comme mentionnée ci-dessus) : il a remarqué qu’il ne va pas mieux, alors même que vous faites tellement pour lui, il se sent alors encore plus coupable de vous entraîner là-dedans. Il peut même lui arriver de dire : « non mais laisse tomber ! Rien ne peut m’aider de toute façon ! » Il ne dit pas là que vous ne pouvez pas l’aider, mais plutôt qu’il ne sait pas lui-même comment vous pouvez l’aider. Pour aller mieux, l’aide et le soutien ne sont malheureusement pas suffisants. On doit changer la façon même dont on pense. C’est un long et douloureux processus, qui n’est pas uniquement guidé par notre capacité à prendre des décisions. S’il suffisait à votre partenaire de penser : « d’accord, alors j’irai mieux demain !”, croyez-moi, il le ferait. Mais il ne sait pas comment aller mieux… pas encore. Alors continuez de poser la question quand vous en avez envie vous aussi : est=ce que je peux faire quelque chose ? Et merci d’essayer.

Les choses peuvent cependant être parfois parfaitement personnelles. Dirigées précisément contre vous. Votre partenaire vous gueulant : « pourquoi est-ce que tu as autant besoin d’attention ? Pourquoi est-ce que tu es si dépendant, accroché à moi comme ça ? je m’en fous de ta soirée avec tes collègues, je m’en suis toujours foutu ! Ton boulot c’est de la merde et tes collègues sont des gros cons ! Vas-y tout seul, je m’en fous de ce qu’ils disent ! » Dans ce cas-là, quel que soit le problème auquel fait face votre partenaire ou ami, il faut lui dire qu’il ne peut vous parler comme ça. Ne gueulez pas vous-même, expliquez juste que vous comprenez qu’il ne veuille pas venir s’il ne se sent pas bien, mais qu’il n’est pas obligé de le dire d’une manière si agressive. Parce qu’entendre ça encore et encore peut aussi détruire votre estime de vous-même, et vous en avez besoin. Et vous la méritez. Point à la ligne.


Alors en fait, je crois que ce que j’essaie de dire, c’est qu’être bienveillant et soutenir quelqu’un ne signifie pas faire tout ce que ce quelqu’un vous demande de faire. Il pourrait bien ne pas se rendre compte de tout ce qu’il exige de vous. Parlez ensemble. Et prenez des moments pour vous. Pour prendre un peu de recul, et voir comment, vous, vous vous sentez avec vous-même.

Je finirai par une anecdote. Une fois, c’était dans une bibliothèque, j’allais aux toilettes. Dans les toilettes, une femme pleurait comme j’ai rarement vu quelqu’un pleurer. Je ne savais pas quoi faire, et j’hésitais encore en me lavant les mains, peut-être même que je suis sortie des toilettes pour y rentrer à nouveau, je ne me souviens pas. Bref, le truc, c’est que j’ai fini par lui demander : « est-ce que ça va ? Je peux vous aider ? » elle a hurlé: « putain je t’ai rien demandé! Occupe-toi de tes affaires! » J’étais terrifiée. Je tremblais de partout. Je suis sortie, et il m’a fallu plus d’une heure pour donner un sens à cette scène. Et bien qu’elle m’ait choquée, j’y suis finalement parvenue. Etant donnée la douleur (ou l’émotion, quelle qu’elle soit) que ressentait cette personne à ce moment-là, tu m’étonnes qu’il était difficile pour elle de communiquer avec moi. J’ai alors arrêté de me demander ce qu’elle avait pu penser (oh mon dieu, peut-être que c’est parce que j’ai hésité, elle s’est dit que je m’en foutais ? Ou alors oh mon dieu c’est parce que je lui ai paru inquisitrice, et qu’elle s’est sentie menacée, etc.). A la place, j’ai réalisé que bien que ça n’a certes pas été le meilleur moment de ma vie (personne n’aime qu’on lui parle ainsi), ça n’était certainement pas non plus le meilleur moment de sa vie à elle. Et alors qu’au début je regrettais de lui avoir parlé, j’ai fini par être contente de l’avoir fait. Ça n’est pas nécessairement le résultat immédiat qui compte. Mais le fait que peut-être un jour quelqu’un demandera à nouveau, et que cette fois, elle répondra.

Top

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s