Will I ever be able to work again? What happens after long-term sick leave.

french flag pastel

OCD and depression made me unable to perform my job. I was no longer able to function on a day-to-day basis. Put together, my sick leave and the time I then stayed off work (after resigning, resting, and then looking for a new job) equates roughly a year. It’s not that long compared to what some may face, but it was long enough to make me question my very ability to work again. I was thinking: what if in every job I try, this depressive cycle goes on?

That’s true. That cycle needs to get broken.

It doesn’t mean you have to resign or to change jobs. I did, but that’s only because in my case it was necessary. I know plenty of people who came back to their old job after long-term sickness. And they’re okay, and they’re great at what they’re doing. Here’s the thing: if you think that what you do can make you happy, then of course it’s worth fighting for it.

In this case, what you probably fear the most is the look and judgements from other colleagues. You think they’d consider you not reliable. You believe they think you’re on the verge of breaking down any minute. Let me tell you something: that’s not true. There are two categories of people. Those who are judgemental and those who are not. If they are judgemental, they won’t start judging you because of mental health issues. They’ve done it long before. So don’t worry, if they speak negatively of you, it is NOT because you had issues. It’s just because they do talk about other people, and nothing you can do can change them if they’ve decided to see things that way. Now the other category of people are non-judgemental (okay, I admit that there are some grey areas in between too, but let’s keep things simple for the sake of the argument). That means that whatever you experience, they won’t think your worth depends on how long a sick leave you take, or how many crises you’ve experienced.


I made the mistake of thinking that if you ever reach the point of going on sick leave for months due to mental health issues, people will no longer trust you. I thought: what’s the point of staying somewhere? I’ll never been given any responsibilities again. If that’s what you think too, I beg you to look at your surroundings with honesty. Don’t you know many people who’ve never experienced some sort of crisis? If we didn’t trust people who’ve had difficulties in their lives, let me tell you something… There wouldn’t be many people working.

It’s a bit like with people you know outside of work. You think that because they know you’ve been a wreck, they’ll never ask you for any advice, they’ll never listen to your opinion any more. What is a sick person’s opinion worth anyway?… Then one day, they do ask you something. You check behind you: is that really you they’re talking to??? How come? Do they really, what… trust you?? You seem surprised. I sure was. But people are just like you: they had their breakdowns too. And yet they are normal people, they keep going. You’ll be trusted again, don’t worry.

Now the question really is: will I ever be able to perform any kind of work? Well that’s a difficult thought when you’re exhausted only five minutes after getting up. But let’s break it down so that it’s more manageable.

First of all, are you able to go back to your previous job? I think in most cases you are, and that’s precisely why people do it. I admire them. They take a break, breathe scream and cry, then start again. If you’re in a job where you think you can be happy one day – even if it means you’re not really happy right now – maybe it’s worth fighting for. I say: ‘maybe’, because I’m no life coach. It depends on what you want in life. And how long you can accept to try.

Second of all, what if you’re afraid that actually, you’ll never be happy in what you’re doing? Well perhaps then, it’s time to assess other possibilities. I realised I needed to change jobs when I had this thought: even if everything goes in the best possible way, I can’t say I’d be happy. There would still be far too much stress, not because of the job, but because of my anxiety. I’m in a job where a personality like mine can never relax. I can never know any break. And I need breaks. Took me years to realise, but yes, I do. Worse still: I want breaks.

So I decided to change.

Now I’m truly happy. Not because everything’s perfect, some days are shit too, but now my job is what it’s supposed to be: something that helps me live. I had to reflect on many things when I chose to make that decision.

You have to realise that what is right is only right for you. For instance, now I work in a library. I spend my days shelving books and tidying up. And I’m not kidding, that’s damn reassuring. With my OCD, I thought I needed to find something where repetition and order are part of the job (because I’d do it anyway), but where the pressure to do this is not too high. Let me explain this. If I don’t shelve a book correctly, nobody’s going to die (although I have occasionally considered this possibility – that’s what OCD does, but I know I can fight the idea on the ground of statistical probabilities, and thanks to CBT). I couldn’t clean and tidy up surgery stuff, for instance. I certainly couldn’t check someone for safety on a fair ride. But books? I’m okay with those.

However, I won’t tell you it’s the dream job for someone who has OCD. It depends on what OCD you have, and of course your personality. A certain amount of repetition is what I need, what I look for. But to other people, it could be a nightmare. Every morning, I go to work knowing that the tasks are pretty much gonna be similar to those of yesterday, and that tomorrow, they’ll be too. I find this incredibly helpful. Some people would find it terrifying and terribly boring. So that’s what I mean: just what reassures you? What does give you balance?

I know when I changed jobs job description wasn’t the only thing I had to consider, too. I, for one, wanted my job to end with the end of the day. I no longer wanted to have poor work-life balance, because I am unable to give myself breaks. Some people are excellent at that. I clearly wasn’t. I needed a job where I don’t ever bring work home. Where even if I obsess over stuff I did at work, there was nothing I could do about them. No essay I’d be re-marking for the third time. No lesson plan I would overdo, and start again from scratch at 3am.

So you wonder: will you ever be able to work again? I’m pleased to say that the answer, in the vast majority of cases, is a big : yes, you will. The first thing you need to do, though, is accept that sick leave and getting off work for what can seem a long time is no mistake, and no laziness. Fight the guilt and the fear of judgements from colleagues and managers alike. Let’s turn something sad into something great: many of us will need to take time off work (very sad fact). Which is precisely why many of us will show understanding and compassion. (great stuff!)

Don’t’worry about what other people think you are capable of. But do, seriously, ask yourself a question: not ‘what am I capable of?’ but: ‘what do I want to be capable of?’ Because it’s nice to be ambitious if you want. But it’s also absolutely fine not to be.


Est-ce que j’arriverai un jour à reprendre le travail ? Ce qui se passe après un long arrêt maladie.

Les TOC et la dépression m’ont rendue incapable de faire mon travail. Je n’arrivais plus à fonctionner au quotidien. Mis bout à bout, mon arrêt maladie et le temps que j’ai ensuite passé sans activité professionnelle (après ma démission, du repos, et une nouvelle recherche d’emploi) représentent environ une année. Ce n’est pas si long comparé à ce que certains doivent traverser, mais ça a été suffisamment long pour que je remette en question ma capacité à travailler. Je me disais : et si dans tous les boulots que je prenais, ce cycle de la dépression revenait ?

Parce que c’est vrai. Il faut briser ce cycle-là.

Ça ne signifie pas qu’il faille nécessairement démissionner ou changer de boulot. C’est ce que j’ai fait, mais parce que dans mon cas, c’était nécessaire. Je connais plein de gens qui retournent à leur travail après un long arrêt maladie. Ils vont bien, et ils sont doués pour ce qu’ils font. Si vous pensez que ce que vous faites peut vous rendre heureux, alors bien sûr que ça vaut le coup de se battre pour.

Dans ce cas-là, ce que vous craigniez certainement le plus, c’est le regard et les jugements de vos collègues. Vous pensez qu’ils vont vous voir comme quelqu’un sur qui on ne peut pas compter. Vous croyez qu’ils sont là à se dire : il/elle est sur le point de craquer à chaque instant. Laissez-moi vous dire quelque chose : c’est faux. Il y a grosso modo deux catégories de gens : ceux qui jugent, et ceux qui ne jugent pas. Ceux qui jugent ont commencé à vous juger bien avant vos problèmes de santé. Alors ne craigniez rien, s’ils parlent de vous en mal, ce n’est pas dû à vos soucis de santé. C’est juste dû au fait qu’ils parlent dans le dos des autres, et vous ne pouvez rien y faire tant qu’ils n’ont pas décidé eux-mêmes de changer. L’autre catégorie (bon okay, j’avoue, ça n’est pas que blanc/noir et il y a des zones grises, mais restons simples pour faciliter l’argumentation). Ça signifie que quoique vous viviez, ils ne penseront pas que votre valeur se mesure en nombre de jours d’arrêt maladie, ou grâce au total de vos moments de crise.

J’ai fait l’erreur de croire que si l’on allait jusqu’au point d’être en arrêt maladie pendant plusieurs mois, personne ne nous ferait plus jamais confiance. Je me disais : à quoi ça sert, de rester à cet endroit, à ce poste ? On ne me donnera plus jamais de responsabilités. Et si c’est ce que vous vous dites vous aussi, je vous implore de regarder autour de vous honnêtement. Ne connaissez-vous pas vous-mêmes pas mal de gens qui ont connu des états de crise ? Si on ne faisait plus jamais confiance aux gens qui ont connu des difficultés au cours de leur vie… ben y aurait plus grand monde pour aller bosser.

C’est un peu comme avec les gens que vous connaissez hors du travail. Vous pensez que parce qu’ils savent que vous avez été une loque à un moment donné, ils n’écouteront plus jamais ce que vous avez à dire, ni ne vous demanderont plus jamais conseil. Qu’est-ce que ça pourrait bien valoir, l’opinion de quelqu’un qui a un grain, de toute façon ? Et puis un jour quelqu’un vous pose une question. Vous vérifiez derrière vous: c’est vraiment à vous qu’il s’adresse ??? Comment ça se fait ? Est-ce que vraiment il… me fait confiance ?? Vous avez l’air surpris. Personnellement oui, ça m’a surprise. Mais les gens sont comme vous: ils ont eu leur moment de craquage, aussi. Pourtant ce sont des gens normaux, qui continuent leur route. On vous fera confiance à nouveau, pas d’inquiétude.


Alors la question, c’est celle-ci : est-ce que j’arriverai un jour à rebosser, quel que soit le travail ? C’est en effet difficile à concevoir quand vous êtes épuisé cinq minutes seulement après être sorti du lit. Procédons donc par étape pour y répondre.

La première chose à savoir, c’est si vous vous sentez capable de retourner à votre poste. Je crois que c’est possible dans la plupart des cas, et c’est pourquoi les gens le font. Je les admire. Ils prennent une pause, respirent hurlent et pleurent, et ils recommencent. Si vous faites un travail qui, selon vous, peut vous rendre heureux un jour (même si là tout de suite vous n’êtes pas forcément heureux), peut-être que ça vaut le coup de se battre pour y rester. Je dis « peut-être », parce que je ne suis pas une coach ni une psy. Ça dépend de ce que vous espérez de la vie. Et de combien temps vous êtes prêts à essayer.

La deuxième chose qui fait peur, c’est de savoir si vous pourrez jamais être heureux dans un boulot, quel qu’il soit. Si c’est ce que vous vous dites, alors il est temps d’envisager plusieurs voies. J’ai réalisé que je devais changer de travail quand cette pensée m’est venue : même si tout se passait du mieux possible, je ne pense pas pouvoir dire que je serais heureuse. Il y aurait toujours beaucoup trop de stress, pas à cause du boulot, mais à cause de mes angoisses. Je suis dans une voie où une personnalité comme la mienne est incapable de trouver du repos. Je ne peux jamais connaître de vraies pauses. Et j’ai besoin de pauses. Ça m’a pris des années pour m’en rendre compte, mais oui, j’en ai besoin. Pire : j’en ai envie.

C’est là que j’ai décidé de changer.

Maintenant je suis vraiment heureuse. Pas parce que tout est parfait, bien sûr qu’il y a des jours de merde aussi. Mais mon boulot est maintenant ce qu’il doit être : quelque chose qui m’aide à vivre. J’ai dû réfléchir à pas mal de trucs quand j’ai pris cette décision.

Notamment, il est essentiel de voir que ce qui est bon pour nous ne l’est peut-être que pour nous. Par exemple, je travaille maintenant dans une bibliothèque. Je passe mes journées à mettre en rayon des livres et à ranger. Et je vous jure, je trouve ça incroyablement rassurant. Avec mes TOC, je me suis dit qu’il me fallait trouver quelque chose où la répétition et l’ordre faisaient partie intégrante du travail, mais pas au point que la pression y soit trop élevée. Laisse-moi m’expliquer un peu mieux. Si je ne mets pas un livre exactement à sa bonne place, personne ne va mourir (bien que je me le sois parfois demandée, car c’est ça que me font les TOC, mais je sais que je peux lutter contre cette idée en prenant appui sur des probabilités statistiques, et aussi grâce aux outils de thérapie cognitivo-comportementale). Je ne pourrais pas, par exemple, nettoyer et ranger du matériel de chirurgie. Et je ne pourrais certainement pas veiller à la sécurité des gens sur un manège dans une foire. Mais des livres ? Ça me va.

Pourtant, je ne vais pas vous dire que c’est le travail parfait pour quelqu’un qui a des TOC. Cela dépend de quel TOC vous avez, et de votre personnalité, bien sûr. Un certain volume de répétition est ce dont j’ai besoin, ce que je recherche. Mais pour d’autres, cela peut s’avérer un cauchemar. Tous les matins, je me rends au travail en pensant que les taches à mener seront similaires à celles la veille, et que demain, elles le seront aussi. Cela m’aide à un point ! Alors que d’autres trouveraient cela effrayant et terriblement ennuyeux. C’est ça, que je veux dire : qu’est-ce qui vous rassure ? Qu’est-ce qui vous donne un équilibre ?

J’ai su lorsque j’ai changé de travail que le contenu du poste n’était pas l’unique facteur à retenir. Je voulais, pour ma part, que mon travail finisse à la fin de la journée. Je ne voulais plus avoir un rapport vie privée-vie professionnelle si déséquilibré, parce que je suis incapable de m’autoriser des pauses. Certains sont excellents dans ce domaine. Clairement, moi je ne l’étais pas. J’avais besoin d’un boulot que je ne ramènerais pas à la maison. Un travail où même si je me repassais encore et encore des scènes de la journée, il n’y ait rien que je puisse y faire. Plus de copie à corriger pour la troisième fois. Plus de cours à sur-préparer, et à recommencer encore à trois heures du matin.

Vous vous demandez si vous pourrez un jour reprendre le travail ? Je suis ravie de vous dire que dans la grande majorité des cas, la réponse est : oui, vous le pourrez. La première chose à faire, cependant, c’est comprendre que prendre un arrêt maladie et ne pas travailler pendant un long moment n’est ni une erreur, ni de la paresse. Luttez contre la culpabilité et les jugements de vos collègues ou de vos chefs. D’un fait assez moche, voyons une belle réalité : beaucoup d’entre nous aurons besoin d’arrêter de travailler pendant un moment (c’est moche), mais c’est précisément pour ça que beaucoup d’entre nous sommes capables de faire preuve de compréhension et d’empathie (belle réalité, non?).

Cessez de vous demander ce dont les autres pensent que vous êtes capables. Mais posez-vous sérieusement une question ; non pas : « de quoi suis-je capable ? » mais : « de quoi ai-je envie d’être capable ? » Parce que c’est bien d’être ambitieux si vous le souhaitez. Mais ne pas l’être peut être un choix tout aussi respectable et judicieux.

Top

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s