Contradictions? People Living with OCD Don’t All Live in Pristine Homes

french flag pastel

When the term OCD is used metaphorically, generally in a light-hearted conversation, it usually – if not always – refers to someone obsessed with cleanliness, patterns, symmetry, perfect organising skills. ‘Oh, yeah, he has such a tidy desk – he’s a bit OCD, really’, ‘Cleaned the whole house today: OCD power!’, ‘so my sister will never let me wear her trousers for fear that I damage them – I mean, she’s a bit OCD with her stuff’…

I don’t particularly mind. I know some people living with OCD would get really upset – and they have the right to be, as they believe this will trivialise their mental illness. I can totally understand someone making that point. However, I’m not upset. I’m aware that using OCD so loosely limits its representation, and gives a partial – if not sometimes downright false – view of what OCD feels and looks like. At the very least, nonetheless, I’m happy that the term is getting more widely known. When I tell people that I have OCD, they may have a limited idea of what it is, but they know I’m referring to obsessions and compulsions… and that’s a good start to get the conversation going, should they want to.


So what I want to highlight here is not the fact that OCD is much more than just that, but the fact that these limited representations make us believe in a consistent, uniform OCD mind. People living with OCD are – just as everyone else – made of contradictions, or at the very least made of what seems to be contradictions to the external observer. Yet, as we shall see, these are not contradictions. There are the very thing OCD creates – namely, a fucked-up mind.

I’ll be concise: you can have OCD, be obsessed with order and cleaning some things – and yet live in a disgusting place. Not because you want to, not because in fact deep down you looove dust and stains, but because it’s your very obsession for order and cleanliness that prevents you from cleaning stuff.

Let us take an example here. Someone who is obsessed about sleeping in a clean bed, for instance, can spend hours – or even days, doing the laundry, washing the same pair of sheets over and over again, put them on the bed, only to start all over again because the result didn’t seem satisfactory: that person spotted a tiny stain, or some dust coming from a piece of furniture nearby or the open window. Anything like that. They will therefore start the whole process again: cleaning, making sure it’s clean, putting them into place. Now all the time they’re dedicating to ensuring their bed is clean is time they can’t put anywhere else. The rest of the bedroom might be a mess. They may have loads of laundry piling up as they only focus on the duvet cover, pillowcases and sheets every day. They may put crumbles everywhere in the kitchen as they no longer have time to eat, so they just eat a poorly-prepared sandwich standing over the kitchen table, and go back to the : cleaning-the-bed priority task… Seems like a contradiction? It is not. It is precisely because they are so obsessed with a few (or many) things that the rest has to wait…

I learned through David Adam’s book The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD, and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought (see the section ‘Liberating Works’ of this blog for the full reference) that maybe this was due to a confusion between OCPD (Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder) and OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder). This is what he writes: ‘Visit the home of someone with OCPD [obsessive-compulsive personality disorder] and not a chair or rug will be out of place. Yet people with OCD whose compulsions demand that they clean often restrict the practice to a specific room. OCD patients can have spotless toilets that sparkle with bleach next to a filthy kitchen caked with months-old food. An OCD washer who cleans his hands 200-odd times a day can wear the same underwear for weeks.’ (pp. 64-65)

The reason for this is simple: time and focus. You can’t focus (to the point of obsession) on everything at the same time, but you sure can get really obsessed about certain specific things.
I also believe there might be conflicting internal values at stake. For instance, I would like the kitchen to be clutter-less. My partner knows that one of my dreams is to see nothing – that’s right, nothing – on the kitchen worktops. Because the less I see, the more I control the stimuli. Yet on the other hand, some things are incredibly hard to remove, so I can very easily get messy – and you might find this completely contradictory. I’ll show you something that’s been on the kitchen worktop for over two weeks now, because I can’t remove it: it’s a broken glass.

broken glass

That’s right, nothing fancy, it’s just a broken glass. It’s a clean broken glass, by the way – nevertheless, I can’t bring myself to throw it away. Just thinking about it makes me feel dizzy, I need to sit down: because if I put in the recycling, someone will get hurt. If they get hurt, it would be my fault. So I need to wrap it in several layers of bubble wraps before I put it away – but then it can’t go into the recycling box, it needs to go in the general waste bin. But then, I picture that guy pushing the waste bag into the truck with full strength, as he feels that it’s actually quite soft, and glass shouldn’t be in non-recyclable waste anyway, and then suddenly he pushes too much, and cuts himself; now he’s going to think that I intentionally wrapped something extremely dangerous in bubble wrap to trick him – and then it’s not only careless, it’s cruel! This story, with hundreds of alternatives, goes like that in my mind forever. Which is why I get exhausted after 5 minutes looking at the glass, and I leave it there.

Don’t get me wrong: I know it’s not going to go away magically. At some point in my life, even though I’m not a severe hoarder (well I don’t think I am anyway), I had more than 25 empty glass bottles and jars that I collected over months, and I put them into a cupboard, because I couldn’t bring myself to take that risk I mentioned. What made it even worse is that in England, at least where I live, you put all your recycling out the day before collection, in specific boxes and bags. And I couldn’t stop thinking: a cat’s going to kill itself on the bottle. A kid will play with an empty jar and bleed to death. A drunken lad is going to fall on the bags and break all bottles, and will get severely injured… So what I did was: take the recycling out as rarely as possible, and wait until very very late at night to make the number of potential walkers-by as small as possible. So yeah, I often stayed awake until very late to take out the recycling: 4am, 5am, 6am. The collection could happen anytime from 7am.

The movie Aviator [spoiler alert, please skip this paragraph if you don’t want to know what happens] showed another common ‘contradiction’ (at this point, I’m sure you understand that I put speech quotes because these are not contradictions): how someone obsessed by the possibility of contamination and bacteria can end up living for months or years with everything their body produces… To avoid the contamination from the external world, they choose to never leave the one room they’ve chosen at their protected space. It may seem irrational, but isn’t it logical? If you don’t go out, you won’t catch anything other people have.

This isn’t to say that OCD sufferers don’t fight these ‘contradictions’. But it’s damn hard, and some of us feel extremely ashamed about them… Especially since, to be good OCD patients, we’re expected to be consistent. Maybe more so than with other mental illness: we have to be extra-clean, extra-organised, extra-careful… If you still think we should, just look for the clinical meaning of ‘hoarding’.

We’re expected to be consistent, as I was saying. Although when I think about it, I remember hearing a similar thing about people going through depression, as I once did: you couldn’t be that bad if you were still able, from time to time, to seem normal (that is: smiling, attending a social gathering, etc.) Yet people living through depression, and not wanting to show it, can spend literally days preparing to hold a fake smile for a three-hour party. And maybe, at that party, you truly won’t know they’ve been a mess for days. It doesn’t make them any less depressed, though.

Although it’s good, and incredibly helpful, to know what the common symptoms are, we probably should all start with this simple question: so, what does this do to you?
Have a good night, folks, and rest assured that you’re not the only one living with internal contradictions.


Contradictions? Les gens qui vivent avec des TOC ne vivent pas tous dans des maisons ultra propres, ultra rangées

[Note aux lecteurs francophones : cet article a beaucoup plus de poids dans le domaine anglophone, où l’acronyme OCD (= TOC) fait maintenant partie du langage courant. Il est en particulier très présent sur internet. Bien qu’il me semble que les francophones l’utilisent moins (mais ça fait un moment que je ne vis plus en territoire francophone, donc je ne sais pas vraiment à quel point j’ai tort de penser qu’il y ait une différence), j’ai néanmoins voulu vous le traduire, car on a quand même une vague idée de ce que sont les TOC quand on entend ce mot, en général.]

Lorsqu’on emploie le terme de TOC de manière métaphorique, en général au détour d’une conversation légère, il renvoie généralement (voire tout le temps) à quelqu’un d’obsédé par la propreté, la symétrie, une organisation parfaite. « Ouais, son bureau est tellement bien rangé, on croirait qu’il a des TOC », « j’ai rangé tout la maison aujourd’hui : super-TOC, c’est moi ! », « alors ma sœur ne veut jamais me prêter ses pantalons, parce qu’elle a peur que je les abîme… Elle est un peu TOC-TOC avec ses affaires »…

Ça ne me gêne pas plus que ça. Je sais que certaines personnes vivant avec des TOC elles-mêmes trouvent cette utilisation dérangeante, car elles craignent que cela ridiculise leur trouble psychologique. Je comprends parfaitement qu’on puisse défendre ça. Cela dit, personnellement cet emploi ne me dérange pas. J’ai bien conscience que le fait d’employer ce terme de manière si légère limite les formes de sa représentation, et donne une vision parcellaire (voire parfois complètement erronée) de ce que les TOC nous font faire et ressentir. Néanmoins, je suis heureuse que ce terme-là gagne en notoriété. Quand je dis aux gens que j’ai des TOC, ils ont peut-être une vision limitée de ce que cela représente, mais au moins ils savent que cela a un lien avec des obsessions et des compulsions… ce qui est déjà une très bonne manière de lancer le dialogue, qu’on poursuit avec plaisir s’ils le souhaitent.

Ce que je veux souligner ici, ce n’est donc pas que les TOC sont bien plus que ça, mais le fait que ces représentations limitées font croire à un esprit cohérent, uniforme chez les personnes atteintes de TOC. Les gens vivant avec des TOC sont, comme tout le monde d’ailleurs, faits de contradictions, ou en tout cas de ce qui peut apparaître comme une contradiction pour un observateur extérieur. Pourtant, comme on est sur le point d’en discuter, ce ne sont pas là des contradictions. Ce sont les conséquences de ce que produisent les TOC, c’est-à-dire un esprit qui part en couille.


Je serai brève : on peut avoir des TOC, être obsédé par le ménage, et pourtant vivre dans un endroit dégueulasse. Pas parce qu’on le souhaite, ni parce qu’au fond, on adooore la poussière et les taches, mais parce qu’une obsession pour le nettoyage peut justement empêcher quelqu’un de nettoyer.

Prenons un exemple ici. Quelqu’un qui est obsédé par l’idée de dormir dans un lit propre, par exemple, peut passer des heures, des jours même, à faire des lessives, à nettoyer la même paire de draps encore et encore, à les mettre sur le lit, pour finir par tout recommencer car le résultat ne semblait pas satisfaisant : ce quelqu’un a remarqué une petite tache, de la poussière venant d’un meuble tout proche ou de la fenêtre entrouverte, quelque chose comme ça. Il recommencera donc tout le processus à nouveau : nettoyer, s’assurer que c’est propre, mettre les draps en place. Mais tout le temps qu’il consacre à s’assurer que le lit est propre, c’est du temps qu’il ne peut pas passer ailleurs. Le reste de la chambre peut être un bordel monstrueux. Le linge sale peut s’accumuler en piles gigantesques, puisque cette personne ne se consacre qu’à sa housse de couette, ses taies d’oreiller et ses draps tous les jours. Peut-être que cette personne met aussi des miettes partout dans la cuisine car elle n’a plus le temps de manger, et avale donc sur un coin de table un sandwich préparé à l’arrache pour mieux retourner à la tache prioritaire du lit propre… Ça semble contradictoire ? Ça ne l’est pas. C’est précisément parce qu’on est obsédés par quelques (ou beaucoup de) trucs que le reste ne peut qu’attendre…

J’ai appris en lisant le livre de David Adam The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD, and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought (voir la section “Liberating Works” de ce blog pour la référence complète) que cela était peut-être dû à la confusion entre Personnalité Obsessionnelle Compulsive et Troubles Obsessionnels Compulsifs [si vous connaissez une traduction française mettant davantage en lumière la différence entre les deux, je suis preneuse]. Voici ce que David Adam note à ce propos : « rendez-vous chez quelqu’un montrant une Personnalité Obsessionnelle Compulsive, et pas une chaise ni un tapis ne sera de travers. Mais les gens présentant des Troubles Obsessionnels Compulsifs qui leur demandent de nettoyer constamment limitent souvent cette pratique obsessionnelle à une seule pièce. Les patients ayant des TOC peuvent avoir des toilettes impeccables, étincelants de passage répétés à la javel, juste à côté d’une cuisine dégueulasse tachetée de bouts de nourritures datant d’il y a plusieurs mois. Un patient ayant des TOC de propreté et se lavant les mains 200 fois par jour peut porter le même slip pendant des semaines. » (traduction des pages 64-65)

La raison en est simple: temps et concentration. Il est impossible de se concentrer (jusqu’àu point de l’obsession) sur tout à la fois, mais on peut se focaliser jusqu’à l’obsession sur quelques éléments spécifiques.

Je crois aussi que des valeurs peuvent entrer en conflit en nous. Par exemple, je voudrais que la cuisine soit parfaitement rangée, sans rien qui traîne. Mon partenaire sait que mon rêve, entre autres, est de ne voir absolument rien (oui, c’est ça, absolument rien) sur les plans de travail. Parce que moins j’en vois, mieux je parviens à contrôler ce qui m’affecte. Mais d’un autre côté, certaines choses sont incroyablement difficiles à enlever pour moi, donc je peux très facilement accumuler un bazar remarquable. Vous trouvez sûrement cela tout à fait contradictoire. Je vais vous montrer quelque chose qui se trouve sur le plan de travail depuis bien deux semaines maintenant, parce que je n’arrive pas à l’enlever : un verre cassé.

broken glass

Oui c’est bien ça, ça n’a rien d’extraordinaire en soi, c’est juste un verre cassé. C’est un verre cassé propre, soit dit en passant ; néanmoins, je n’arrive toujours pas à le jeter. Rien que d’y penser me donne comme des vertiges, j’ai besoin de m’asseoir : parce que si je le mets au recyclage, quelqu’un va se blesser. Si quelqu’un se blesse, ce sera ma faute. Je dois donc emballer le verre dans plusieurs couches de papier bulle avant de le jeter, mais donc je ne peux plus le mettre au recyclage, car il est emballé, donc je dois le mettre dans la poubelle normale. Mais alors là, ce qui me vient c’est l’image du gars qui pousse le sac poubelle dans son camion, de toute sa force, puisqu’il sent que le sac est souple et que du verre ne devrait pas s’y trouver de toute façon. Et voilà que tout-à-coup il pousse trop fort et il se coupe. Maintenant il va croire que j’avais fait exprès d’emballer du verre tranchant dans du papier bulle comme pour lui tendre un piège, et alors là ça n’est même plus de la négligence, c’est de la cruauté ! Cette histoire, avec ses centaines d’alternatives, tourne comme ça en boucle sans s’arrêter. C’est pourquoi après 5 minutes à y penser je suis déjà épuisée par ce bout de verre, et je laisse là où il est.

Comprenons-nous bien: je sais qu’il ne va pas s’enlever tout seul comme par magie. À un certain moment de ma vie, même si je ne souffre pas sévèrement du TOC de l’accumulation (en tout cas je pense être un cas vraiment très léger), j’avais chez moi 25 bouteilles et bocaux en verre vides que j’avais accumulés au cours des mois ; je les mettais dans un placard, car je n’arrivais pas à prendre le risque que j’ai mentionné plus haut. Ce qui rendait la chose pire encore, c’est qu’en Angleterre, en tout cas où j’habite, on met tout son recyclage dehors la veille du ramassage des poubelles, dans des caisses et des sac prévus à cet effet. Et je n’arrivais pas à penser à autre chose qu’à un chat qui allait se tuer sur une bouteille. Ou à un enfant qui jouerait avec un bocal vide et qui saignerait jusqu’à ce que mort s’ensuive. Ou à un mec bourré qui tomberait sur les sacs et qui, en cassant ainsi toutes les bouteilles, se blesserait grièvement… Alors ce que je faisais, c’était simple : je sortais le recyclage le plus rarement possible, attendant une heure avancée de la nuit pour diminuer au maximum le nombre potentiel de passants. Oui, je restais souvent éveillée très tard dans la nuit pour sortir le recyclage : 4h du mat’, 5h, 6h. Le ramassage pouvait avoir lieu à n’importe quelle heure à partir de 7h.

Le film Aviator [attention je balance la fin, ne lisez pas ce paragraphe si vous ne voulez pas savoir ce qui s’y passe] montre une autre ‘contradiction’ répandue (au point du texte où vous en êtes, je suis sûre que vous comprenez que je mets là des guillemets car ce n’est pas réellement une contradiction) : selon quelle logique quelqu’un d’obsédé par la peur de la contamination et des bactéries peut finir par vivre pendant des mois ou des années avec tout ce que son corps produit… Pour éviter la contamination venant du monde extérieur, des gens choisissent de ne jamais quitter la pièce qu’ils ont élu comme étant leur espace protecteur. Cela peut paraître irrationnel, mais est-ce que ça n’est pas logique ? Si on ne sort pas, on ne risque pas d’attraper ce qu’attrapent les autres au dehors.

Tout cela ne revient pas à dire que les personnes souffrant de TOC ne luttent pas contre ces « contradictions ». Mais c’est vraiment dur, et certains d’entre nous nous sentons particulièrement honteux de présenter ces contradictions au monde extérieur. Surtout en raison du fait que pour être de bons patients atteints de TOC, on attend de nous qu’on soit très cohérents. Peut-être encore plus cohérents qu’avec n’importe quel autre trouble psychologique : on doit être ultra propre, ultra organisé, ultra précautionneux, etc. Et si vous pensez toujours qu’en effet, on le devrait, cherchez simplement ce qu’est la définition de l’ « accumulation » et de la peur de jeter relative aux TOC.

Comme je le disais, on attend de nous que l’on soit cohérents. Mais en fait, quand j’y réfléchis, je me souviens avoir entendu la même chose à propos de gens atteints de dépression : si de temps en temps on arrive à avoir l’air normal (en souriant, en se rendant chez des gens pour une soirée, etc), c’est bien qu’en fait on ne va pas si mal qu’on le dit… Pourtant, là encore, nulle contradiction. Les gens traversent une dépression, et ne voulant pas le montrer, ils peuvent passer des jours à se préparer un faux sourire pour une soirée de trois heures. Et peut-être qu’en effet, à cette soirée, on pourrait ne pas voir l’état de détresse dans lequel ils ont été les jours précédents. Mais ça ne fait pas d’eux des gens moins dépressifs.

Bien que ce soit formidable de connaître les symptômes les plus répandus, et bien que cela puisse aider quelqu’un considérablement, on devrait peut-être tout simplement commencer par cette question : et toi, en fait, ça te fait quoi, à toi ?
Bonne nuit à tous, et rassurez-vous : vous n’êtes pas les seuls à vivre emplis de contradictions.

Top

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s