New Diagnosis

IMG_20191213_112238504_HDR

french flag pastel

There are results you fear more than others.

On Thursday night, I was rushed to the hospital. Hours earlier, my GP had asked me to see him, after my blood results had returned: it wasn’t said on the phone nor on the letter, but they were “quite alarming”, he confirmed when I met him. My blood sugar level was 17, when it should have been less than 5.4. A urine sample confirmed that my ketones level was 2.2, instead of an acceptable 0.6. I hadn’t even heard of ketones until that day. When the doctor said, « Your body has gone into starvation mode », I said, « Well I sure haven’t! » And I laughed. He didn’t.

– No, really. You need to go to the hospital right now for an assessment.
– And that would be to assess…?
– Do you have a history of diabetes in your family?

From then on it all went really fast, and a bit surreal. I was to go home, prepare an overnight bag in case the hospital wanted to keep me, wait for the ambulance. He said the words: « You’re diabetic ». Wait, am I? I would know it if I was, wouldn’t I? Wait! Wouldn’t I?

When the ambulance arrived, one of the two paramedics was quite surprised to see me « so well ». I tried to make a few jokes, to avoid showing I was uncomfortable myself. I didn’t tell him the reason I couldn’t drive was OCD. I just said as I always do, “I’m sorry I don’t drive”. He was cross someone had called an ambulance for me, when I could have gone in a car. I apologized again. He said it wasn’t my fault, but I was the one listening to him as he explained that I was “taking the space of a sick patient”. After that, we didn’t talk very much. Especially after he asked me about current medication as he was filling in a form on his Ipad, and I said Fluoxetine.

– And why are you taking it?
– OCD and depression.

I didn’t talk about the guilt.

At the hospital we went from service to service to see where I should go.

– You’ve got a bad foot?
– That? Oh, no, it’s nothing! Just a foot drop.
– Isn’t it why you’re here?
– No, it’s my blood.

They asked me to sit down in A&E. A little over two hours later, a nurse came to get me. I had tried to read a novel after seeing a sign on the wall: “4-5 hours on 12/12/19 @ 17.00 to be seen by a doctor from time of arrival.”

As blood formed droplets on my fingertips, people were voting for the future of the UK. The future of the NHS. I was worried. I had been for weeks. And now even this new diagnosis (I wasn’t sure: was it for certain yet? Were we still wondering if I had diabetes or was it a done deal?) wasn’t pushing the fear away. Quite the contrary: sat on a public hospital chair, being careful not to put blood everywhere, it was getting closer and closer. There I was, a European immigrant to the UK, waiting to be assessed for free by a medical system which had known cuts after cuts over the last few years.

My blood sugar level had increased. In French, when we worry, we say that we “make bad blood” (“se faire du mauvais sang”). I no longer wanted to laugh, though, sitting on a chair in this overcrowded ward. Half an hour passed. Or was it an hour? Minutes after they had admitted me in a cubicle for more blood tests, I could hear them talk behind the blue curtain: “It’s way too high. She needs to be seen by the doctor.” The nurse looked at my other arm, found a vein. It was only salted water, I was told.

It was about 10pm and the first estimates were in: Conservative 368, Labour 191. I switched off the phone screen. I didn’t feel like commenting at all. It was a done deal. If it turned out to be type 1, it’d have always been.

After three hours in the ward, I was moved to a different cubicle.

– So, you’re diabetic?
– Apparently so.
– You didn’t know?
– I definitely didn’t know.
– Why did you see your GP?
– Because of a foot drop. I’m also very dehydrated. I might have been drinking between 4 and 5 litres of water a day since September.
– Can you walk for me?

I walked for them.

Polling stations were now closed. It was 1am.

– At least I can confirm the results are back, and you’ve haven got Diabetic ketoacidosis.
– Oh, that’s good!
– You’re familiar with Diabetic ketoacidosis?
– Well, I’ve been reading the NHS website as I was waiting…

I was brought a bed. A stretcher, actually. I so wanted to lie down. Nurses could see this as I was shrinking on my chair, doing nothing – couldn’t read, nor my book or my phone. They spent their time apologizing: “Sorry you had to wait for so long, it’s so busy tonight. We have a bed shortage.” Like the man in the ambulance, it was my turn to say: “It isn’t your fault. Please don’t worry. It isn’t your fault.” The nurse injected insulin into my body for the very first time.

Votes were still being counted as I lay below the aggressive light of the ward. After one hour, I was given two blankets. I put one over my head to make it dark. The man waiting on another stretcher, next to me, said: “Well, now I’ve seen it all!” Later, he would give me money, asking me to go to the cafe (he couldn’t walk) and bring £70 worth of cake and biscuits for all the nurses. “It’s Christmas, after all.” The biscuits were tree-shaped and had red and gold topping. Tinsels had been stuck to the walls.

Every hour and a half since arrival, a nurse would check my temperature (36.4), my blood pressure (I have no idea what it was), my blood sugar level, sometimes my ketones level too (now 3.1). When my blood sugar level reached 25.8 around 3am, they said we needed to do it again, to make sure. It was too high, far too high. The new reading was 26.4. “If it isn’t better in one hour, we’ll need to give you more insulin”. I dropped in and out of sleep. It got better (19), and at about 5am I was moved to the Medical Assessment Unit. I wanted to walk, but they said: “No no no, stay on the stretcher.” Watching the ceiling unfold, I listened to the nurses’ conversation, and obviously didn’t understand who they were talking about, but someone had lost their baby. Sadness came to sit on my chest.

The new location was a lot more comfortable: there was a proper bed, and the lights were dim. I changed into the night gown they gave me, and tried to sleep.

From 7am onwards, I spent the day being seen by medical staff. I had my first education about diabetes. First, an expert came to explain what it was, remind me of the pancreas’ role, and why they thought there – as did my GP – that I was a type 1. Then another doctor came to explain how to use an insulin flexpen, and the reader I’ll be given to test my blood sugar level. I was given needles. Lancets. A yellow safe box to dispose of them. Another expert came to give me a whole pile of leaflets. One of them read: “Diabetes and emotional well-being”. There was some sort of magazine, too: “Everyday life with Type 1 diabetes”.

– So, that’s a bit of a shock, isn’t it?
– It is, I suppose.
– How do you feel about it all?
– Absolutely fine, thank you.
– Mmh. Are you sure?
– Yes, I am.
– You’re going to be okay.
– Oh, I know.
– Don’t worry.

Between discussions and blood controls, I watched my Facebook and Twitter timelines. The people of the UK had spoken, and I wasn’t best pleased with what they had to say – nor were most of my friends. I wasn’t alone. And Q. had said he would come straight after work if I needed to.

A newly diagnosed diabetic immigrant in a British hospital, I could finally go outside to smoke a cigarette, the first one in 14 hours. On my way to the main entrance, I noticed a plaque:

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of
the National Health Service
and
the official opening of
Derriford hospital
on 22nd August 1988
by
the Prime Minister
the right honourable
Margaret Thatcher, FRS MP

Speaking of important dates, it was now Friday 13th.

 


 

Nouveau diagnostic

Il y a des résultats qu’on redoute plus que d’autres.

Jeudi soir, j’ai été amenée d’urgence à l’hôpital. Quelques heures plus tôt, mon généraliste m’avait demandé de venir le voir après que mes analyses de sang étaient revenues : on ne me l’avait pas dit au téléphone ou sur la lettre, mais ils étaient « plutôt inquiétants », a-t-il annoncé quand je l’ai vu. Mon taux de glycémie était de 17, alors qu’il aurait dû être de moins de 5,4. Un examen d’urine confirma une présence de corps cétoniques de 2,2, au lieu d’un taux maximal de 0,6. Je n’avais jamais entendu parler de corps cétoniques jusqu’à ce jour. Quand le médecin m’a dit : « Votre corps s’est mis en mode ‘famine’ », j’ai répondu : « Ah bah pas moi, en tout cas ! », et j’ai ri. Lui non.

– Non, vraiment, vous devez aller à l’hôpital tout de suite pour de plus amples examens.
– Et qu’est-ce qu’on cherche, en fait ?
– Il y a des personnes diabétiques, dans votre famille ?

À partir de ce moment-là, c’est allé très vite. Et c’était un peu irréel. Je devais rentrer chez moi, préparer un sac pour la nuit au cas où on voudrait me garder à l’hôpital, et attendre l’ambulance. Il prononça les mots : « Vous êtes diabétique. » Attendez, vous êtes sûr ? Ça se saurait, si je l’étais non ? Attendez ! Ça se saurait, non ?

Quand l’ambulance est arrivée, un des deux ambulanciers a été très surpris de me voir « si en forme ». J’ai essayé de faire quelques blagues, pour ne pas montrer que je me sentais moi-même mal à l’aise. Je ne lui ai pas dit que la raison pour laquelle je ne conduisais pas, c’était les TOC. J’ai juste dit, comme je le fais toujours, « Excusez-moi, je ne conduis pas ». Il était énervé que quelqu’un ait appelé une ambulance pour loi, alors que j’aurais pu y aller en voiture. Je me suis excusée encore. Il a dit que ça n’était pas de ma faute, mais c’était bien moi qui l’écoutais me dire que je prenais « la place d’un patient malade ». Après ça, on n’a plus vraiment parlé. Surtout après qu’il m’a demandé de préciser les médicaments que je prenais actuellement, pour un formulaire qu’il remplissait sur son Ipad. J’ai dit de la Fluoxétine.

– Et pourquoi vous en prenez-vous ?
– TOC et dépression.

Je ne lui ai pas dit, pour la culpabilité.

À l’hôpital, nous sommes allés de service en service pour voir où je devais aller.

– Vous avez mal au pied?
– Ça ? Oh non, c’est rien, juste un steppage.
– C’est pas pour ça, que vous êtes ici ?
– Non, c’est à cause de mon sang.

On m’a demandé de m’asseoir aux urgences. Un peu plus de deux heures plus tard, une infirmière venait me chercher. J’avais essayé de lire un roman après avoir vu sur une ardoise, au mur : « 4 à 5 heures d’attente le 12/12/19 @ 17h avant de voir un médecin, à partir de votre heure d’arrivée ».

Alors que le sang perlait au bout de mes doigts, les gens votaient pour le futur du Royaume-Uni. Pour le futur de la NHS, le système britannique de Sécurité Sociale. J’avais peur. J’avais peur depuis des semaines. Et maintenant, même ce nouveau diagnostic (j’avais un doute : c’était sûr, du coup ? Est-ce qu’on se demandait encore si j’avais du diabète ou était-ce une affaire déjà réglée ?) ne repoussait pas cette peur-là. Au contraire : assise sur la chaise d’un hôpital public, attentive à ne pas mettre du sang partout, cette peur-là se faisait plus pressante. J’étais là, immigrée européenne au Royaume-Uni, attendant d’être traitée gratuitement par un système médical qui avait, ces dernières années, connu coupe budgétaire après coupe budgétaire.

Mon taux de glycémie avait augmenté. Je comprenais sous un jour nouveau l’expression « se faire du mauvais sang ». Je n’avais plus envie de rire, pourtant, assise sur cette chaise d’une salle bondée. Un demi-heure passa. Ou était-ce une heure ? Quelques minutes après m’avoir reçu dans un nouveau box, je les entendais parler derrière le rideau bleu : « C’est beaucoup trop élevé. Elle doit voir un docteur. » L’infirmière regarda ensuite mon autre bras, y trouva une veine. C’était simplement de l’eau salée, apparemment.

Il était à peu près 22h et on donnait les premières estimations. Parti conservateur 368, parti travailliste 191. J’éteignis l’écran de mon téléphone. Je n’avais même pas envie de commenter ça. L’affaire était réglée. Si c’était du type 1, ça avait même toujours été déjà réglé.

Après trois heures dans la salle, on m’amena à un autre box.

– Donc vous êtes diabétique ?
– Apparemment, oui.
– Vous ne le saviez pas ?
– Vraiment pas, non.
– Pourquoi êtes-vous allée chez votre médecin ?
– Parce que j’ai un steppage. Et je suis très déshydratée. Depuis septembre je dois boire 4 à 5 litres d’eau par jour.
– Pouvez-vous me montrer comment vous marchez ?

Alors j’ai marché.

Les bureaux de vote étaient bel et bien fermés. Il était 1h du matin.

– Au moins je peux vous confirmer que les résultats nous sont parvenus, et vous ne faites pas d’acidocétose diabétique.
– Ah, ça, c’est bien !
– Vous savez ce que c’est ?
– Disons que j’ai lu des trucs sur le site de la NHS en attendant…

On m’amena un lit. Un chariot brancard, en fait. J’avais tellement envie de m’allonger. Les infirmières le voyaient bien, alors que je me tassais de plus en plus sur ma chaise, lasse – je ne parvenais pas à lire, ni mon livre ni mon téléphone. Elles passaient leur temps à s’excuser : « Désolée de vous faire attendre si longtemps, il y a tellement de patient·e·s ce soir. Nous n’avons plus aucun lit de libre. » Comme l’ambulancier, c’était à mon tour de dire : « Vous n’y êtes pour rien. Ne vous inquiétez pas. Vous n’y êtes pour rien. » L’infirmière m’injecta de l’insuline dans le corps pour la toute première fois.

On comptabilisait encore les bulletins de vote à l’heure où je m’allongeais sous la lumière blafarde de la grande salle. Au bout d’une heure, on m’amena deux couvertures. J’en mis une sur ma tête pour qu’il fasse sombre, et l’homme sur le brancard à côté du mien déclara : « Ah ben j’aurais tout vu ! » Plus tard, il me donnerait de l’argent et me demanderait d’aller au café (il ne pouvait pas marcher) pour acheter £70 de gâteaux et de biscuits pour les infirmières. « C’est noël, après tout ! » Les biscuits avaient une forme de sapin et étaient décorés de rouge et d’or. Aux murs pendaient des guirlandes.

Chaque heure et demie, depuis mon arrivée, une infirmière avait vérifié ma température (36,4), ma tension (aucune idée de combien elle était), mon taux de glycémie, et parfois mon taux de corps cétoniques (à présent 3,1). Quand mon taux glycémique atteint 25,8 vers 3h du matin, elle me dit qu’il fallait le reprendre pour être bien sûres de ça. C’était trop élevé, bien trop élevé. La machine affiche 26,4. « Si ça ne s’améliore pas dans l’heure qui vient, on devra vous redonner une piqûre d’insuline. » Je restais vaguement assoupie. Le taux s’améliora (19), et vers 5 heures du matin on m’emmena dans une autre unité, la Medical Assessment Unit. Je voulais marcher pour y aller, mais on me dit: “Non non non, vous restez allongée là.” J’écoutais les infirmières discuter alors que se déroulait le plafond, et bien sûr je ne comprenais pas de qui elles parlaient, mais quelqu’un avait perdu son bébé. Le chagrin vint s’asseoir sur ma poitrine.

Le nouvel endroit où on m’amenait était bien plus confortable : il y avait un vrai lit, et la lumière était tamisée. Je passai la chemise de nuit qu’on m’avait donnée, et essayai de dormir.

À partir de 7h, je passais la journée à rencontrer le personnel médical. On m’apprit des choses sur le diabète. D’abord, un expert vint m’expliquer ce que c’était, me rappela le rôle du pancréas, m’expliqua pourquoi ils pensaient là-bas, comme mon généraliste, que j’étais de type 1. Puis une doctoresse vint m’expliquer comment utiliser un flexpen pour l’insuline, et la machine qu’on me donnerait pour contrôler mon taux de glucose. On me donna des aiguilles pour les piqûres, pour les prélèvements du sang. Une boîte jaune sécurisée pour les jeter. Une autre experte vint me donner une grosse pile de dépliants. Sur l’un deux, on lisait « Diabète et bien-être psychologique ». Il y avait aussi une sorte de magazine : « Le diabète de type 1 au quotidien ».

– Alors, c’est un peu un choc pour vous, non ?
– Oui, un peu.
– Comment vous vivez cette annonce ?
– Je la vis bien, merci.
– Mmh. Vous êtes sûre ?
– Oui oui.
– Ça va aller, vous aller voir.
– Oh, je sais bien.
– Ne vous inquiétez pas.

Entre les discussions et les contrôles sanguins, je consultais mes comptes Facebook et Twitter. Le peuple britannique s’était prononcé, et tout comme la plupart de mes ami·e·s, j’étais tout sauf heureuse de ce qu’il avait dit. Je n’étais pas seule. Q. avait dit qu’il viendrait tout de suite après le boulot si j’avais besoin.

Immigrante récemment diagnostiquée diabétique dans un hôpital britannique, je pus enfin aller fumer une cigarette dehors, la première en 14 heures. Sur mon chemin, je croisai cette plaque :

En commémoration du 40e anniversaire de la
NHS
et
de l’inauguration officielle de
l’hôpital de Derriford
le 22 août 1099
par la Première Ministre
la très honorable
Margaret Thatcher, FRS MP (Membre de la Société Royale)

En parlant de dates importantes, nous étions maintenant vendredi 13.

Top

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s