On Failing

french flag pastel

Because I have two books published, and have received awards, funding, and invitations at various events for my writing, it is quite common for people to see me as someone who always – or at least very often – succeeds. I’m extremely happy about any of my accomplishments, but although I would love this success story to be true, it simply isn’t.

At least there isn’t in the UK this toxic idea that France still encourage so readily: that writers are inspired geniuses, who just sit there for a while, wait for some divine inspiration to strike, and then write their whole new book in a week, or a new poem in 20 minutes, and it’s read worldwide at once, and we’re all in awe of such great minds. Well, I don’t know about other people, and I’m sure it’s different for everyone, but I sure have to work very hard every time I write a text, however short. I work for hours, weeks, on a piece of just 20 lines. The heartbreaking thing being that I may have worked for hours for a text that is just, well… not good. And I know I won’t be using it. So it ends up in the bin. And I start all over again.

When I do find the text good, though, after my perfectionism has visited numerous times, I usually want to use it for something. To publish it somewhere. Easy, you think? Haha. I wish. No, I mean, I truly wish, I’m not going to lie. I’d love to have that amount of social recognition that means every single thing you write is going to be accepted in acclaimed magazines as soon as you email the editor. I would even love to be famous enough to know that every single book I write is going to be a best-seller. Not because of the fame or applause, but because I could actually make a living out of my writing, and never need another job ever again. That’s my absolute fantasy: write and read all day. No need for an idyllic location or overflowing bank account, just write whenever I like.
That is so not my situation, however. I write because I can’t imagine a single week without writing. Like I can’t imagine not reading for more than two days in a row. And because I want my texts to exist for others too, I try to get my text published. And it’s a hard, competitive, often discouraging process.

It’s a bit like your stats on your blog. I love my blogs, and because I’m active on social media, I’m sure some people think my blogs are read every day by hundreds of people. Hahaha! They’re so not! And that’s okay. But honestly, we need to stop that obsession and shame about blog stats: sometimes, my blogs aren’t visited by a single person for days. Sometimes, I get one visit in a full week. Nonetheless, I still love blogging, and will keep doing it. Of course I’d love to be read more often, by more people. I mean, come on, why would you use blogging if that wasn’t to find readers? But I’m fine with things as they are, and I want to reassure the many bloggers or social media fans I’ve met: the vast majority of blogs have an extremely small number of readers. And it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t exist.


I want to say all this because I often read interviews where writers say: ‘this is the very first time I enter a competition, so I couldn’t really believe it when I was told I got the first prize and later sold 300,000 copies of my book, now translated in 28 languages.’ These people are amazing and I’m truly happy for them! Actually, I usually read their work, because I think it must be exceptional on some level to have been spotted on their very first try. But that’s not me. I have sent my writing to so many competitions, magazines, journals, without even being shortlisted. I know I shouldn’t say this. Because the first thing you’d think, then, is: ‘well, that just means your writing wasn’t good enough’. I honestly think sometimes, it was true, and I worked again on my piece and made it way better. But I think that most of the times, rejection came for many, many other reasons: there are so many entries, and so many brilliant entries, even when you entered with your best piece it may not be spotted among the hundreds of submissions. And another judge may have shortlisted you, but not that one. All of this to say, my work has been rejected dozens of times. Maybe hundreds if I count every competition I entered since I was 14, every publisher I contacted, every journal I emailed my poems to. I just keep working.

So when I announce some great news on social media, it means that it’s one of these rare occurrences when I received an email starting with: ‘Congratulations’. And I’m bursting with joy and gratefulness, honestly I am. I then try to give a real existence to every single piece of work that manages to get out there. Because we all know a text is nothing if not read. So after having worked on getting a piece published, I work on getting this text to potential readers. And because I don’t believe in straightforward, opportunistic self-publicity, it takes an incredibly high amount of time, energy, and patience. But that’s okay. It’s all part of the job, and it’s a job I just wish I could do more.


You see, we’re quite far from the story people usually expect me to tell: ‘Oh, I sent it to that one publisher, they thought it was the most amazing thing they had read since Flaubert, so they decided to publish my text and offer me a five-digit salary’.

Yet I’m not finished. I like to be challenged and try new things, therefore I send a lot of emails, letters, and parcels – many places still don’t accept electronic submissions. More often than not, what I get is a simple type-thing rejection. ‘We are sorry to let you know that after careful consideration…’ And every single time, I have to deal with disappointment. It doesn’t get any easier. Every single time, I’m deeply disappointed, because of course I wouldn’t even consider submitting something if I didn’t believe in it. If I didn’t believe it could get read, selected, published, I wouldn’t waste anyone else’s time. So the thing I’ve done most, as a writer, is learn to live with disappointment and multiple failures. These days, the word ‘failure’ is not particularly trending. We want to make it more positive, ‘oh, but you learnt something from it’. Hell, yeah, but mostly, the lesson was about being disappointed again. Of course I keep going. Of course. But every single time, sorry if I appear childish or arrogant, it hurts. You may know on a rational level not to take things personally, but especially if you feel down at that time, that all sounds like a beautiful lie. I don’t show it because you don’t have time to really show it, you need to work on your writing.


I’ve talked mainly about writing, but it was the same for job applications. I have a PhD, so you see, it’s something people usually associate with an extremely successful life. Though I’ve been rejected many times for positions I really thought I could get, and god knows I doubt myself. I’ve been to interviews and thought it went really well for once, only to have the rejection email waiting three hours later in my inbox. That was freaking hard. Much more so than the writing, because it was of course a question of financial necessity, there: I needed to work, if only just to pay my rent. And yet: ‘no’, ‘no’, ‘no’, ‘no’. Sometimes ‘yes’, but mostly: ‘no’.

So I want to destroy a few myths here.
1. Most people, even the most successful ones, are not successful all the time. Of course they live with rejection. Probably a lot of them, actually. The only thing is: they don’t talk about it.
2. You can’t always turn a failure into something positive. And that’s fine, because it’s not supposed to be. Sometimes, it just sucks. Awesome people around you, I’m sure, will be happy to hear you say just that, and won’t insist on your ‘looking on the bright side’.
3. But in order to sometimes succeed, to get your art and ideas considered, you need to be prepared for rejection. Not as in ‘oh I don’t care, resentment and bitterness is something I never feel’ (who are these people?!), but ‘one day, it will work, because I’ll bloody work for it until it works’.


I don’t believe in inspiration as the main source of writing, or success. I believe in dedication, focus, tenacity. Sorry, it certainly doesn’t sound as romantic. I know I still have many failures ahead of me. I’d love not to, but I’m not naive. I won’t pretend it won’t hurt. I know that every single time it will be painful. But hey, I’ll keep going, and want to encourage you to do the same, because I suspect we are in fact the vast majority. Nothing unusual here, so keep trying.


À propos de l’échec

Parce que j’ai publié deux livres, et que j’ai reçu des distinctions, des bourses et des invitations à divers événements du fait de mon écriture, il est relativement courant que les gens me voient comme quelqu’un qui réussit toujours (ou du moins très souvent) ce qu’elle entreprend. Je suis infiniment heureuse de chaque chose que j’ai accomplie, mais bien que j’aimerais que cette histoire de succès soit la mienne, ça n’est absolument pas le cas.

Au moins, il n’y a pas au Royaume-Uni cette idée toxique qu’on encourage si volontiers en France : celle selon laquelle les écrivain·e·s ne sont que des génies inspirés, qui s’assoient juste un moment, attendent l’inspiration divine, et hop écrivent leur nouveau livre en une semaine, ou un nouveau poème en 20 minutes, et ce texte est lu dans le monde entier dans la foulée, et nous voilà en admiration béate devant de si grands esprits. Alors, je ne sais pas pour les autres, et je suis sûre que ça dépend tout simplement des gens, mais en tout cas pour ma part je dois travailler dur et longtemps à chaque fois que j’écris un texte, même s’il est court. Je travaille pendant des heures, des semaines, sur un texte de vingt lignes. Et le pire, c’est qu’il est possible que j’aie passé tout ce temps sur un texte qui n’est tout simplement… pas bon. Et je sais que je n’en ferai rien. Il part à la poubelle, et je recommence à nouveau.

Quand je pense que le texte est bon, cependant, après que mon perfectionnisme soit venu me rendre ses fréquentes visites, généralement j’espère en faire quelque chose. Le publier quelque part. Facile, vous dites ? Haha. J’aimerais bien. Non, je suis sérieuse là, j’aimerais vraiment, je ne vais pas mentir. J’aimerais beaucoup avoir ce niveau de reconnaissance sociale qui fait que chaque chose qu’on écrit sera accepté dans les magazines les plus reconnus, dès que son éditeur·trice reçoit notre courriel. J’aimerais même être suffisamment célèbre pour savoir que n’importe quel livre que je publierai sera un best-seller. Ni pour la gloire ni pour les lauriers, mais parce que je pourrais alors en vivre, d’écrire, et que je n’aurais plus jamais besoin d’avoir un autre emploi à côté. C’est mon grand fantasme : écrire et lire toute la journée. Pas besoin d’un lieu paradisiaque ou d’un compte en banque plein à craquer, juste pouvoir écrire quand je le souhaite.

Or ça n’est pas, mais alors pas du tout, ma situation. J’écris car je ne peux pas imaginer une seule semaine sans écrire. Comme je ne peux imaginer ne pas lire plus de deux jours de suite. Et parce que je veux que mes textes existent pour d’autres, j’essaie que mes textes soient publiés. Et c’est un processus difficile, compétitif, et souvent décourageant.


C’est un peu comme les statistiques d’un blog. J’adore mes blogs, et parce que je suis active sur les réseaux sociaux, je suis sûre que certain·e·s s’imaginent que mes billets sont lus tous les jours par des centaines de gens. Alors là, hahaha ! Pas du tout, désolée. Mais ça n’est pas grave. Honnêtement, il faut vraiment qu’on arrête avec cette obsession et cette honte que l’on s’inflige concernant les statistiques de lecture : parfois mes blogs ne comptent pas même une seule visite pendant plusieurs jours. Parfois, j’atteins une unique visite sur toute la semaine. Pourtant, j’aime blogguer et continuerai à le faire. Bien sûre que j’aimerais être lue plus souvent, par plus de gens. Pourquoi est-ce qu’on ouvrirait un blogue, si ça n’était pas pour trouver un lectorat ? Mais je suis contente des choses telles qu’elles le sont aujourd’hui, et je veux rassurer les nombreux bloggueurs·euses et fans de réseaux sociaux que j’ai recontré·e·s : la vaste majorité des blogues ont un nombre de lecteurs·trices extrêmement restreint. Et ça ne veut pas dire qu’ils ne devraient pas exister.


Je tiens à dire tout ça car je lis souvent des entretiens où des écrivain·e·s déclarent : « c’est la première fois que je participe à un concours, alors vraiment je n’arrivais pas à y croire quand on m’a dit que j’avais gagné le premier prix, et qu’ensuite mon livre s’était écoulé à 300 000 exemplaires et avait été traduit en 28 langues. » Ces gens sont géniaux et je suis, du fond du cœur, ravie pour eux ! D’ailleurs, généralement je vais lire leurs écrits, parce que je me dis qu’ils sont forcément exceptionnels pour avoir été repérés comme ça, du premier coup. Mais en tout cas, ça n’est pas mon histoire. J’ai envoyé mes écrits à de nombreux concours, magazines, journaux, sans même faire partie de la pré-sélection. Je sais que je ne devrais pas dire ça. Car du coup, la première chose que vous allez vous dire, c’est : « oui, ben ça veut juste dire que tes textes n’étaient pas aussi bons que ça. » Je pense sincèrement que parfois oui, c’était le cas, et ça m’a poussée à retravailler un texte pour le rendre meilleur. Mais je pense que dans la majorité des cas, je n’ai pas été retenue pour tout un tas d’autres raisons : il y a tellement de candidatures, et d’excellentes candidatures, même quand on envoie son meilleur texte il est possible qu’il ne soit pas repéré parmi ces centaines de candidat·e·s. Et un autre juge vous aurait peut-être sélectionné·e, mais celui-là·celle-là, non. Tout ça pour dire que mon travail n’a pas été retenu des dizaines de fois. Et peut-être même des centaines, si je prends en compte tous les concours auxquels j’ai participé depuis mes 14 ans, toutes les maisons d’édition que j’ai contactées, tous les magazines auxquels j’ai envoyé mes poèmes. Je continue de travailler.

Alors quand j’annonce une bonne nouvelle sur les réseaux sociaux, ça veut dire que c’est là l’une de ces rares fois où j’ai reçu un courriel qui commençait par: “Félicitations”. Et j’explose de joie et de gratitude, vraiment. Ensuite, j’essaie de donner une existence réelle à chacun des textes qui atteint la publication. Parce qu’on sait tou·te·s qu’un texte n’est rien s’il n’est pas lu. Donc après avoir travaillé pour qu’un texte soit publié, je travaille pour qu’il trouve ses potentiel·le·s lecteurs·trices. Et comme je ne crois pas à l’autopromotion directe et opportuniste, ça prend énormément de temps, d’énergie et de patience. Mais ça ne fait rien. Ça fait partie du boulot, et c’est justement un boulot que j’aimerais tellement faire à plein temps.


Vous voyez, on est bien loin de l’histoire que les gens s’attendent généralement à ce que je raconte : « Oh, j’ai envoyé ça à une maison d’édition, qui a pensé que c’était la chose la plus extraordinaire qu’ils·elles avaient lu depuis Flaubert, donc ils·elles ont décidé de publier mon texte et de me donner un salaire à 5 chiffres. »

Et je n’ai même pas fini. Comme j’aime expérimenter et essayer des choses nouvelles, j’envoie énormément de courriels, de lettres, de colis (beaucoup d’endroits refusent encore les envois électroniques). La plupart du temps, ce que je reçois en retour, c’est une lettre-type de refus. « Nous sommes au regret de vous dire qu’après avoir lu avec attention… » et chaque fois, il me faut faire avec cette déception. Ça ne devient pas plus facile avec le temps. Chaque fois, je suis profondément déçue, parce qu’évidemment il ne me viendrait même pas à l’esprit de proposer quelque chose si je n’y croyais pas. Si je ne croyais pas que ce texte pouvait être lu, sélectionné, publié, je ne me permettrais pas de demander à quelqu’un d’y consacrer au moins un peu de son précieux temps. Finalement, la chose que j’ai faite le plus souvent, en tant qu’écrivaine, c’est apprendre à vivre avec la déception et les nombreux échecs. À notre époque, le mot « échec » n’est plus vraiment tendance. On veut lui donner un air positif, « oh, mais tu as dû apprendre de cette expérience ». Alors d’accord, j’ai appris, mais généralement l’apprentissage se limitait surtout à être une fois de plus déçue. Bien sûr que je continue quand même. Bien sûr. Mais à chaque fois, et désolée si je parais infantile ou arrogante, à chaque fois ça fait mal. On a beau savoir qu’il ne faudrait pas, d’un point de vue rationnel, prendre les choses personnellement, ça a tout l’air d’un mensonge bien déguisé dans ces moments où on se sent déprimé·e. Je ne le montre pas car évidemment on n’a pas le temps de le montrer, il faut se remettre à bosser son écriture.


J’ai surtout parlé d’écriture, ici, mais c’était pareil pour mes demandes d’emploi. J’ai un doctorat, ce qui est généralement quelque chose que les gens associent à une vie de réussite. Pourtant je n’ai pas été retenue plein de fois pour des emplois dont je me sentais vraiment capable, et dieu sait si je peux douter de moi. J’ai été invitée à des entretiens, en suis ressortie en pensant que pour une fois, ça s’était très bien passé, tout ça pour trouver le courriel de rejet de candidature attendant bien tranquille trois heures après dans ma boîte mail. Bordel, c’était dur. Bien plus que l’écriture, parce que bien sûr il s’agissait là de nécessités financières : je devais absolument trouver un emploi, ne serait-ce que pour payer le loyer. Et pourtant : “non”, “non”, “non”, “non”. Parfois “oui”. Mais la plupart du temps: “non”.


Alors je voulais m’en prendre à quelques mythes, ici.
1. La plupart des gens, même ceux qu’on considère comme ayant le plus de succès, n’ont pas de succès tout le temps. Évidemment que ces gens doivent gérer les refus. Probablement pas mal de refus, d’ailleurs. La seule chose, c’est qu’ils n’en parlent pas.
2. On ne peut pas toujours faire d’un échec quelque chose de positif. Et ça n’est pas grave, parce que ça n’est pas comme ça que ça marche. Parfois, ça casse juste vraiment les coui**es. Et les gens formidables qui vont entourent seront, j’en suis convaincue, absolument capables de vous entendre dire simplement ça, et n’insisteront pas pour que « vous voyiez les choses du bon côté ».
3. Mais pour réussir parfois, pour que votre travail et vos idées soient prises en compte, vous devez vous préparez au refus. Non pas dans le sens « oh, ça m’est égal, moi le ressentiment et l’amertume, ce sont des choses que je ne ressens jamais » (non mais ça existe, des gens comme ça ?!), mais dans le sens : « un jour, ça marchera, parce que je compte bien bosser jusqu’à ce que ça marche ».


Je ne crois pas à l’inspiration comme source majeure d’écriture, ni de réussite. Je crois au dévouement, à la concentration, à la ténacité. Désolée, ça ne fait pas aussi romantique. Je sais que j’ai encore plein d’échecs à venir. J’aimerais vraiment que ça ne soit pas le cas, mais je ne suis pas naïve. Je ne vais pas faire semblant que ça ne m’atteindra pas. Je sais qu’à chaque fois, ça fera mal. Mais je continuerai malgré tout, et je veux vous encourager à faire de même, parce que quelque chose me dit que nous représentons la majorité. Il n’y a rien de particulièrement rare là-dedans, alors continuez d’essayer.

Top

Advertisements