Judge less, help more: a case against official or unofficial reporting of social distancing breaches

french flag pastel

Today’s number 1 health priority is to flatten the curve of Covid-19 infection. We’ve all heard it: stay home, save lives.

Yes indeed. If you can stay home, not order anything from anywhere, avoid going to the shops, not go out in any circumstances, not meet anyone, by all means, please do so. Yet at a time when we need even more solidarity, some are using the argument of solidarity to do what they do best: judge others from the comfort of their privilege. Which, as a result, reinforces the inequalities they work so hard to deny in the first place.

It is important to highlight individual responsibility, because it matters. A lot. Not everything is due to a vague “system”, which would mean that no one is ever to blame for their actions (“It’s not my fault, the system made me do it”). However, at the same time, individual responsibility doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It is shaped by many different factors: social, economical, political, familial, …

Like me, you’ve all seen/heard it: people call the police to report that their neighbours are douchebags for going out when they don’t absolutely need to. People put up pictures on social media of random joggers (sometimes taken months ago, by the way, but whatever…). People blame friends who still meet despite being told repeatedly they shouldn’t do so.

Sometimes, using the argument of “solidarity” to blame people who need it most.

I won’t even start with how tragic it is, once again, to witness the hypocrisy; people who usually don’t report domestic violence they know of as “they don”t want to be intrusive”, are among the first ones to pick up the phone to call the police and say that a dangerous group of at least three teenagers are currently… chatting in a park! God forbid! No, let’s not even go there. Let’s not even talk about another hypocrisy: people “clapping for carers” every Thursday at 8pm, but calling the police to say someone is their area is “always going out”… They’re a nurse, but get this: they go out even when they’re not working. Well done, Sherlock. So it’s okay going out to save your ass, but going out to process it all, after weeks of dealing with fear and death, isn’t? Again, I won’t even go there. But let’s talk about some issues at stake here.

Firstly, it seems impossible for some to accept that having the absolute same objective in mind, we genuinely might try to reach it by taking different directions. For instance, I made the choice of not ordering anything by post, when I could, for weeks. I believe it was the best I could do to support my community. Others have chosen, on the contrary, to order food, books, IT stuff, you name it, either because they wanted to help small businesses within the community, or because they needed it to implement the rules of social distancing. Yes, I had a webcam long before all of this started. Some didn’t. Yes, I have enough books to keep me in lockdown for two years. Some don’t. I don’t think never ordering non-essential things right now is the best and only way to try and take part in this collective effort. Surely, it’s a little bit more complicated than that.

Secondly, and this is really upsetting me, we act as if we all were in the same situation, and all had the same needs… We don’t. And I’m not only talking about money or space here. Once again people living with mental illnesses and disorders are being invisibilised. Don’t get me wrong, I can’t say it enough: the absolute priority right now, in the name of public health, is to do anything we can to flatten the curve of coronavirus. Health systems in any country won’t be able to cope otherwise. But people are living with other illnesses, which haven’t vanished all of a sudden.

It might be annoying for you to stay home. It can be hell for other people. Sorry, you just can’t compare the two. Like anyone interested in mental health, I’ve been extremely worried, for weeks, about the impact this necessary social distancing and lockdown will have on people suffering from OCD, depression, claustrophobia, etc. I pray every day that people don’t become more suicidal… So if someone is having dark thoughts and need to order whatever from Amazon in order not to put themselves at immediate risk, I’m not judging that. I’d rather judge all the companies who’ve kept their employees working for so long without any safety measures… Likewise, some people are unfortunately living in extremely toxic environments. They experience domestic abuse. If they need to go out three times a day to avoid their abusive partner or father, again, I fail to see how they are to blame. And you think domestic abuse is “obvious”? That you would know, if someone in your neighbourhood or non-immediate family was being abused? All studies have proven you’re wrong. Violence, especially towards women and children, exists everywhere – women and children with disabilities are particularly at risk. Let’s not forget either homophobia and transphobia, which for many young people especially, turns “home” into the least safe of places. Don’t think for one minute that because someone “seems fine”, it doesn’t mean they aren’t struggling every single day, either within their own minds or with others.

I’m not only talking about immediate danger. We all know mental health is a long-term issue. Some people today are trying to prevent feeling overwhelmed or burnt out in a few months. Their choices may not be the same as yours, but if that’s what they need in order to stay safe, then so be it. Apparently we need to say it again: health isn’t just physical. It’s mental, too.

I supported the lockdown before it was implemented in the UK. I believe it’s the only way we can vaguely try and control the situation. But this has never given me the arrogance of believing anyone else going out was a selfish bastard, as I see every day on social media… Sure, some people are selfish, and don’t care putting other people’s lives at risk for their own petty comfort. I hate them. Yes, I do, even though “hate” doesn’t really promote kindness, and I’m all for kindness and understanding. Look: I may be naive, but I want to believe that the vast majority of people are doing the best they can. The best they can isn’t the best you can, is all. We don’t all live in (and with…) the same conditions.

I’ve been out twice in seven weeks. Sure, I miss being able to go out. But come on, I’m going to start whining when I live in a big house and have a fucking garden? The very fact that I have several rooms, and not just the one, and that I only have to share that space with my partner, no other family members, is luxury. I can be in a room on my own – and not even a bedroom – for hours at a time, all while being self-isolating. So if people need to go out at times, because they’re feeling overwhelmed by the presence of their children, parents, siblings, then I’d rather they go out reasonably (and I’m not the one defining what is reasonable) than start being depressed, or – let’s not pretend we don’t know this happens – aggressive towards others or themselves.

It’s not just a question of living in a big flat with a balcony. Some people have disorders that are made way worse at the moment. Actually, some people who’d never thought they were “the anxious type” (a reminder that it can happen to all of us, there’s no definite “anxious type”) are developing disorders such as OCD. And in a way, how can we escape it, in such circumstances? When do you know disinfecting your house is just “what you need to do” and when you’re going overboard, feeding new compulsions? As someone living with OCD (especially checking compulsions), I know it’s hard enough to know in a non-pandemic context, so…
Likewise, we’re bombarded with tips about how “not to get fat during the lockdown”. Gosh. Sure, reinforcing fatphobia, in addition to always being a shit idea anyway, is great when people are stuck at home and therefore perhaps more likely to develop, without even noticing, eating disorders… And how about the vast amount of people experiencing grief right now? It’s awful enough at anytime… But to know you can’t even visit a loved one who’s sick… That you can’t even say goodbye… Well, these people, for all I care, can go to the park for four hours if that’s why they need.

I just wish we dropped the whole my-neighbour-is-an-asshole set of mind, and move to this one instead: most people are doing the best they can with what they’ve got. And yes, even when doing so, they’ll make mistakes. But some things are not mistakes: they’re just not the thing you would have done.

Most people right now, I believe, are feeling guilty all the time. I’ll take food shopping as an example. You feel that if you go for your weekly, bi-weekly or monthly shopping, you might as well buy more items, because it means fewer visits to the shop. And yet, you can’t, because you feel people would think you’re stockpiling… It’s a lose-lose, feel crap-feel shit situation. Same thing for online shopping, drive service or deliveries: “I won’t go to the shop, at least that’s one less person there. I’ll order in or do a click and collect. But then, someone else than me is taking that risk? Because at some point, the items have to be brought to me…”

We’ve rarely talked about public health so much. Some people are discovering for the first time why solidarity is so crucial in this area (yes, please don’t vote Conservatives, or any party promoting private health care systems). I won’t say “at least that’s good”. It’s not a good thing, because as others have said before me, this pandemic isn’t a good thing for anything, or anyone. It’s absolute crap. At least let’s try to remain as kind as we can in the meantime.

If you think by promoting kindness, I’m romanticising being passive, you’re wrong. It’s not about loving everyone or everything. I despise, more than ever, all the factors that make some people more at risk than others. I’m not smiling politely at people who fight every day against equality, and would like to have me believe that “this is not a time for politics”. On the contrary, it sure is. We know what we risk because of the system that we have. I’m not forgetting this.

But I also want people to see the difference between someone who’s actively trying to increase inequalities, and act like a hypocrite for 2 months, and people who are just trying to survive.

Think twice, please, before you add a condescending post to your social media, or before you pick up that phone.

Please. Stay Safe.


Jugeons moins, aidons plus: Contre les dénonciations officielles ou officieuses des manquements aux règles du confinement

La priorité numéro 1 en ce moment, du point de vue de la santé, est d’aplatir la courbe d’infection du Covid-19. On l’a entendu: en restant à la maison, on sauve des vies.

C’est vrai. Si vous pouvez rester à la maison, ne commander de choses nulle part, éviter d’aller dans les magasins, ne pas sortir du tout, ne rencontrer personne, alors faites-le. Mais à l’heure où l’on a encore plus besoin de solidarité, certains utilisent cet argument pour faire ce qu’ils font de mieux: juger les autres depuis le confort de leur privilège. Ce qui a pour conséquence de renforcer les inégalités qu’ils mettent tant de coeur à nier.

C’est important de souligner la responsabilité individuelle, car c’est vrai qu’elle jour un rôle important. Tout n’est pas le résultat d’un “système” abstrait qui permettrait que personne n’ait jamais à justifier ses actions (“C’est pas de ma faute, c’est le système qui m’a obligé”). Pourtant, dans le même temps, la responsabilité individuelle ne sort pas de nulle part. Elle est façonnée par de nombreux facteurs: sociaux, économiques, politiques, familiaux…

Comme moi, vous l’avez forcément vu ou entendu: les gens appellent la police pour dénoncer leurs voisins, ces enfoirés qui sortent alors que ce n’est pas vital. Les gens postent sur les réseaux sociaux des photos de joggeurs (certaines ayant été prises il y a des mois, mais bon…). Les gens accusent les amis qui continuent de se voir alors qu’on leur a répété de ne plus le faire.

Parfois, ils utilisent l’argument de la “solidarité” précisément pour accuser ceux qui en ont le plus besoin.

Je ne vais même pas me lancer devant l’hypocrisie habituelle, aussi tragique que d’habitude. Les gens qui ne dénoncent jamais les cas qu’ils connaissent de violence domestique parce que “on ne s’immisce pas dans la vie privée” sont parmi les premiers à décrocher leur téléphone pour appeler les flics et dire qu’un dangereux groupe d’au moins trois adolescents sont en train de… discuter dans un parc! Grands dieux! Non, je n’irai même pas jusque là. Je ne parlerai pas non plus de l’hypocrisie de ceux qui applaudissent tous les soirs à 20h mais appellent les flics parce qu’une personne en bas de chez eux “est toujours dehors”… Certes, c’est une infifmière, mais attendez: elle ose sortir même quand elle ne travaille pas. Bien joué, Sherlock. Donc sortir pour aller sauver ton cul, ça va, mais sortir pour gérer tout ça, après des heures, des semaines à avoir fait face à la peur et à la mort, ça ne va plus? Non, je ne parlerai même pas de ça. Mais parlons tout de même de quelques-uns des problèmes qui sont en jeu ici.

D’abord, il semble impossible à certains d’accepter que voulant atteindre le même objectif exactement, nous puissions essayer d’y aller par des chemins complètement différents. Par exemple, j’ai fait le choix de ne rien commander par la poste, si je le pouvais, pendant toutes ces semaines. Je crois que dans mon cas, c’était le meilleur moyen de protéger les gens. D’autres ont choisi au contraire de commander de la nourriture, des livres, du matériel informatique, peu importe, soit parce qu’ils voulaient soutenir les commerces indépendants, soit parce qu’ils avaient besoin de ce matériel-là pour respecter les règles de la distanciation sociale. Personnellement, j’avais une webcam bien avant que tout ceci commence. D’autres non. Personnellement, j’ai assez de livres chez moi pour tenir deux ans. D’autres non. Je ne pense pas que ne pas commander du tout de choses non-essentielles, en ce moment, soit le seul et unique moyen de participer à l’effort collectif. C’est un peu plus compliqué que ça, quand même.

Ensuite, et cela m’énerve au plus haut point, on se comporte comme si nous étions tous dans la même situation, comme si nous avions tous les mêmes besoin… Or, c’est faux. Et je ne parle pas uniquement d’argent et d’espace ici. Une fois de plus les gens vivant avec des troubles psychologiques sont invisibilisés. Qu’on se comprenne bien: la priorité absolue en ce moment, en termes de santé publique, est d’aplatir la courbe de l’épidémie de coronavirus. Aucun système de santé, quel que soit le pays, ne peut s’en sortir autrement. Mais les gens vivent aussi avec d’autres maladies, qui ne se sont pas envolées en même temps comme par magie.

C’est peut être chiant pour vous de rester à la maison. Pour d’autres, c’est un enfer. Désolée, les deux ne sont pas comparables. Comme n’importe quelle personne qui s’intéresse aux troubles psychologiques, je suis très inquiète, depuis des semaines, de l’impact que ces mesures nécessaires que sont la distanciation sociale et le confinement vont avoir sur les gens souffrant de TOC, de dépression, de claustrophobie, etc. Je prie chaque jour que les gens ne deviennent pas plus suicidaires. Alors si quelqu’un a des pensées hyper noires et a besoin de commander un truc sur Amazon pour ne pas se mettre directement en danger, je ne le juge pas. Je jugerais plutôt les entreprises qui ont laissé travailler leurs employés pendant si longtemps sans aucune mesure de sécurité… De même, certaines personnes vivent dans des environnements éminemments toxiques. Elles sont victimes de violence domestique. Si elles ont besoin de sortir trois fois par jour pour éviter leur compagnon ou père violent, une fois de plus, je ne vois pas en quoi elles sont à blâmer. Vous pensez que la violence domestique est “évidente”? Que vous le sauriez, si quelqu’un de votre voisinage ou de votre famille étendue en était victime? Toutes les études vous donnent tort. La violence, en particulier envers les femmes et les enfants, existe de partout – et les femmes et les enfants ayant des handicaps sont particulièrement à risque. N’oublions pas l’homophobie et la transphobie, qui pour de nombreux jeunes en particulier, transforme le foyer en l’endroit le moins sûr qu’on puisse trouver. Arrêtez de penser que parce que quelqu’un “a l’air d’aller”, ça ne veut pas dire que ce quelqu’un n’est pas dans lutte quotidienne, avec lui-même ou avec d’autres.

Je ne parle pas que de danger immédiat. Nous savons que le bien-être psychologique s’inscrit dans la durée. Certaines personnes aujourd’hui sont en train d’éviter de se sentir complètement submergées, ou de connaître un burn-out, dans quelques mois. Leurs choix sont peut-être différents des vôtres, mais si c’est ce dont elles ont besoin pour prendre soin d’elles, alors qu’il en soit ainsi. Apparemment, il faut le redire: la santé n’est pas que physique. Elle est mentale, aussi.

J’ai soutenu le confinement avant qu’il ne soit mis en place au Royaume-Uni, parce que je crois que c’est la seule manière que nous avons de vaguement contrôler la situation. Mais ça ne m’a jamais donné l’arrogance de penser que tous les gens qui sortaient étaient de gros connards, comme je le vois écrit tous les jours sur les réseaux sociaux… Oui, certains sont égoistes, et se foutent de mettre en danger la vie des autres pour leur petit confort personnel. Je les déteste. Oui, je les déteste vraiment, bien que “détester” quelqu’un n’aille pas dans le sens de la bienveillance, et que je tente de défendre la bienveillance et la compréhension. Mais voilà: je suis peut-être naïve, j’ai tout de même envie de croire que la grande majorité des gens font vraiment du mieux qu’ils peuvent. Le mieux qu’ils peuvent n’est peut-être pas le mieux que vous pouvez, vous, c’est tout. On ne vit pas tous dans les mêmes conditions. On ne fait pas face aux même maux.

Je suis sortie deux fois en sept semaines. Bien sûr que ça me manque de pouvoir sortir. Mais soyons sérieux, je vais me mettre à chialer alors que je vis dans une grande maison avec un putain de jardin? Le simple fait que j’aie plusieurs pièces, et non pas une seule, et que je n’aie à partager cet espace qu’avec mon compagnon, pas d’autres membres de ma famille, est un luxe. Je peux être seule dans une pièce – et même pas une chambre – pendant plusieurs heures, tout en me confinant. Si des gens doivent parfois sortir, parce qu’ils se sentent dépassés par la présence de leurs enfants, parents ou frères et soeurs, alors je préfère qu’ils sortent raisonnablement (et ce n’est pas à moi d’en définir le seuil) plutôt qu’ils commencent à tomber en dépression ou qu’ils – ne faisons pas semblant d’ignorer que c’est aussi ça qui se passe – ne deviennent agressifs envers eux-mêmes ou leur entourage.

Ce n’est pas juste une question de vivre dans un grand appartement avec un balcon. Certaines personnes ont des problèmes psychologiques que la situation actuelle aggrave. Et même, beaucoup de gens qui ne s’étaient jamais considérés comme faisant partie des anxieux (ce qui nous rappelle que n’importe qui peut le devenir) développe des troubles comme les TOC. Et dans un sens, comment pourront-on l’éviter, au vu des circonstances actuelles? Quel est la différence entre désinfecter sa maison parce que c’est la chose à faire, et la désinfecter par compulsion ou rituel? En tant que personne vivant avec des TOC (surtout des TOC de vérification), je sais que c’est déjà difficile à percevoir hors d’un contexte de pandémie, alors maintenant…
Parallèlement, on nous bombarde de message “comment ne pas grossir pendant le confinement”. Sa mère. Bien sûr, renforcer la grossophobie, déjà que c’est une idée de merde en tous temps, quand les gens sont coincés à la maison et peut-être ainsi plus susceptibles de développer, sans même s’en rendre compte, des troubles alimentaires… Et parlons de tous les gens qui doivent en ce moment vivre un deuil. C’est horrible à n’importe quel moment… Mais ne pas même pouvoir rendre visite à une personne qu’on aime, et qui est malade… Ne pas pouvoir lui dire au revoir… Hé bien ces gens, pour ce que j’en pense, peuvent bien sortir quatre heures de suite si c’est ce dont ils ont besoin.

J’aimerais juste qu’on laisse un peu tomber le côté mon-voisin-est-un-connard, et qu’on en tente un autre: la plupart des gens font du mieux qu’ils peuvent avec ce qu’ils ont. Et oui, faisant cela, ils feront des erreurs. Certaines choses cependant ne seront pas des erreurs: ça n’est juste pas ce que vous, vous auriez fait.

La plupart des gens en ce moment, je crois, se sentent en fait perpétuellement coupables. En faisant les commissions , par exemple. On se dit que tant qu’à aller faire nos courses hebdomadaires, bi-hebdomadaires ou mensuelles, autant acheter plus d’articles, comme ça on ira moins souvent dehors. Mais on ne peut pas, parce qu’on se dit que les gens autour penseront qu’on fait des réserves… Dans les deux cas, on se sent mal. Situation perdant-perdant. Pareil pour les courses à domicile ou en drive: “Je ne vais pas aller dans le magasin, ça fera déjà une personne de moins. Oui mais du coup, une autre personne que moi, le prend, ce risque, parce qu’il faut bien m’amener mes courses?”

On a rarement autant parlé de santé publique. Certains découvrent pour la première fois pourquoi la solidarité est si essentielle à ce titre (oui, s’il vous plaît, ne votez pas à droite, ni pour un parti défendant la privatisation des hôpitaux et des soins). Je ne dirais pas “tant mieux”. Ce n’est pas une bonne chose. Comme d’autres l’ont dit avant moi, cette pandémie n’est une bonne chose pour strictement rien, ni pour personne. C’est de la vraie merde. Essayons juste de rester qussi bienveillants que possible.

Si vous croyez qu’en promouvant la bienveillance, je rends quelque peu romantique la passivité, détrompez-vous. L’idée, ça n’est pas d’aimer tout et tout le monde. Je vomis, aujourd’hui plus que jamais, tous les facteurs qui font que certaines personnes sont plus en danger que d’autres. Je ne souris pas poliment aux gens qui tous les jours combattent l’égalité, et voudraient aujourd’hui me faire croire que “ce n’est pas le moment de faire de la politique”. Au contraire, ça n’a jamais été autant le moment. On sait ce que l’on risque du fait du système que l’on a. Je ne l’oublie pas.

Mais j’aimerais aussi qu’on fasse la différence entre quelqu’un qui essaie activement de creuser les inégalités, et joue l’hypocrite pendant deux mois, et les gens qui essaient simplement de survivre.

Réfléchissez à deux fois, s’il vous plaît, avant de poster ce statut condescendant sur les réseaux sociaux, ou avant de décrocher votre téléphone.

Prenez soin de vous.

Top