In a time of pandemic: capitalism, decisions, and individual responsibility

IMG_20200313_111606316_HDR

french flag pastel

Firstly, I want to send my compassion to you all. Whatever your choices are, whatever decisions you make, I think it’s fair to say we all feel completely lost and overwhelmed right now.

Since the World Health Organization declared Coronavirus Covid-19 a pandemic last Wednesday, strategies have been decided and measures taken the world over. Let’s be clear: taking no measures – like they’re doing in the UK right now, pretty much – is also a chosen strategy. It sends a clear message. And it’s this message I’ve been thinking about for the past 4 days.

Why am I talking about this on a blog about OCD, depression, and grief? Well, the grief part is, sadly, obvious… I’m sorry for all the families who will have to say goodbye far too soon, without even being able to kiss and hug each other – perhaps the cruelest grieving process… About OCD and depression: I’m thinking about all the people who, like me, due to mental illness, find it extremely hard, if not downright impossible, to make decisions and not agonize over them, to decide what measures to implement in this contradictory information we are given. I’m thinking about how difficult it may be right now, especially for people living with OCD who struggle for hours daily, in the most peaceful time, with checking and anti-contamination compulsions. How difficult it might be too for hypochondriac people, and others living with a wide range of mental health issues… I’m sending solidarity, as I can’t really send much else…

 

I’m French and have been living in the UK for 10 years. These past few days, I have therefore been particularly interested in the actions taken (or indeed, not taken) both in France and the UK. I’ve seen France ignore efforts in China as well as the recommendations coming from Italian doctors and scientists, probably thinking France knew better… Recently, though, France has announced the closure of all schools, non-essential shops, restaurants, cafes, cinemas, and clubs. I believe public transport will be next. (I believe it should be.) In the UK, probably encouraged by the Brexit atmosphere, the government of Boris Johnson still acts like they don’t have to impose any measures. Europe is the epicentre of the pandemic, but they’re not part of Europe, are they? Oh, they will act. I’m sure (I hope) they will. But why take so long? Even only to show to your people that they matter?

Well, the fact that the UK doesn’t do shit (pardon my French, and let’s however thank Scotland for what they did) is the same reason France didn’t act earlier. First, they need to protect capitalism. I mean, can you imagine the devastating consequences for businesses if the whole country was to be put in lockdown? Oh yes, I have a vague idea. Like you do to. Because this is our system: every decision ever taken by our governments is first and foremost there to benefit – or at the very least not hurt – our economic system. Hence why I don’t think we can ever get a truly left-wing government in our countries: they’ll still be expected to encourage investments and production, inexpensive employment, and mass consumption… Let’s not just blame the top, shall we? It’s what we’re used to as citizens too, and many of us are not willing to lose this lifestyle: we want to be able to go to a shop almost anytime, anywhere, to buy something we want, not need. We want to have our say, and most of the time, this means we want to be customers rather than mere users (of schools, libraries, public services). We want to get our food conveniently delivered or promptly served to us in restaurants. To get that coffee from our usual Starbucks. To be able to travel miles for no other reason that we can, so why not? This is how we live. I’m not talking about people who don’t have any other choice than to rely on external help. Disabled people may need their food delivered, the shopping and cleaning done for them. I’m talking about desires, not needs. That’s what capitalism is about. To make us believe, after a while, that these desires are needs, when they’re really not.

I can’t speak of other countries, but in France and the UK, the impact of a lockdown is barely thinkable. See how horrified people are when looking at Italy’s deserted streets. See how (mostly white and wealthy) “customers” react, on a continent where they’ve been used to travel as they please, when they’re told that a border will remain shut, that a ski resort needs to be evacuated, that a plane can’t take off. See those faces as they realise it wasn’t daily-life they were experiencing. It was privilege. We only needed one crisis to be forced to realise it.

Everything is interconnected. Shut factories and ban imports, shops will soon be empty (although due to overproduction and overconsumption, I’m pretty sure we have far more than we think…). Ban public transports, people have to learn again how to live in their own space. I’m like you all. I’m not used to this. I travel a lot. Rarely do I stay more than six months in the same place. Even though I have a home – A home I love, that I share with someone I adore. But give me an opportunity, and I’ll jump at it. I’m going to stop jumping for a while, though, it seems.

 

Three days ago, I was supposed to travel to Morocco for work. I had spent months (and a lot of money) preparing for it. I had attended several medical exams due to my conditions, paid really expensive travel cover (let me tell you, diabetes + OCD + depression aren’t good for your quote). I was excited. About to meet great people and visit places I had never been to. Until Wednesday, I was so busy with the preparation bit, I hadn’t really listened to the news or gave it much thought. I knew things were pretty grim in Italy. After all, I’m on Twitter. I knew we were being told in the UK to wash our hands frequently, and I was doing it, of course. I didn’t cough, and I knew that if I did, I had to cough into my elbow. That’s all pretty standard anyway. I’ve worked in customer service, and that’s definitely what you learn there, to make sure you don’t pass anything to a colleague or customer. Use tissues once, flush them immediately, that sort of things. But on Wednesday, the WHO forced me to listen: it was a pandemic.

On Thursday morning, I woke up to a different feeling: now that everything was packed, now that I was ready to go, only now did I ask myself: should I, actually? My flight was leaving on Friday morning, and because I didn’t want to miss it and since I don’t drive, I had booked a hotel room at Gatwick Airport for the night before.

I spent my last morning home reading travel advice from official and not so official websites. Trump had just announced that all flights from Europe were banned (apart from those coming from the UK, because he was making a political point, of course he was). I had never agreed with Trump on anything, and there I was, thinking that maybe… he had a point. Not regarding the UK exception, of course, but the non-travelling part. Let’s face it: my trip was linked to a work contract, so that’s tricky, but it wasn’t essential. I looked up the website of every single airport I knew, in the UK, France, and Morocco, to see how flights were affected. Apart for flights to/from Italy, they really weren’t, it seemed to me. I spent a lot of time catching up on all the information that frankly, I had overlooked, purposefully or not. I read newspaper releases for the past two weeks, confronted different sources, from different countries, in both English and French. By 1pm, it was time to catch my coach. I left. My legs were shaking. But as someone living with OCD, I didn’t know whether I was overreacting due to my OCD or because I really should have reacted that way. I had trouble deciding what to do, but that’s just my usual behaviour. Was it because there was no clear guidance, contradictions all around us? Or because I always agonize over the most trivial decisions? Was I being ridiculous? Irrational? Was I panicking? Or was the situation indeed that serious, and my decision not to be taken lightly?

While I was on the coach my future colleagues called me. They understood my concern. So far, I had read that there had only been six cases of coronavirus declared in Morocco. Six. Here in the UK, they talked about 500, but I knew the real figure was much higher. In the thousands, probably. Someone said between 5,000 and 10,000. I had no symptoms (there wouldn’t have even been a doubt as to what to do, then), but you can carry the virus for days without knowing it… What if I crossed that border, and brought with me the worst uninvited guest? Can you honestly face being responsible for the spread of a pandemic in a country still virtually untouched?

So I read about travels. People not wanting to miss out on their holidays. I read how Europeans refused to acknowledge what it meant, to live in the pandemic epicentre, when we’d always been so quick to blame it on other countries … I read about how due to Ebola, people from Africa were not welcome at all in Europe, and yet, with our live documented coronavirus outbreak, we were still visiting Cuba, Tunisia, Argentina, unchallenged. I read how in Africa especially, the vast majority of the first covid-19 cases had been introduced by tourists… Not people visiting their families, attending a wedding or a funeral. Tourists. Could there be a more accurate synonym for “non-essential travel”? Some were apparently taking advantage of the low prices on cruises, flights, circuits. It couldn’t have been clearer. The only reason why we didn’t shut borders (and god knows I believe in no-border spaces) and cancel all flights was our submission to capitalism, not that the situation wasn’t all that bad. Capitalism as we now it is built on colonialism. This idea that we, white Europeans, own the world – the sky, even. That it’s our most basic human right to “move freely”. Who moves freely? I was able to go to Morocco just like that, with a valid passport, and stay up to three months, no questions asked. Moroccan people have to ask for expensive and limited visas even just for a few days in Paris… I had spent the last year in the footsteps of Montaigne, reflecting on the relationship between travel, in particular travel writing, and privilege. Was I to forget all I had written, all I believed in too, just because I really wanted to go on that work trip? I didn’t want to let my employers down. Losing that amount of money felt scary too. Capitalistic factors. How can these ever compare to risking people’s lives?

As someone who finds it hard to make decisions, it may disgust the most leftist of you, but I find it easier to know what to do when there is official guidance to rely on. I was hoping for one to be released, one which would say: from today onwards, no one can fly in or out of the UK unless their trip is essential. Sadly for me, this statement didn’t come… The British page for Foreign Travel Advice stated very clearly, on the contrary, that you would not be eligible for any compensation, were you to cancel a trip to a country not listed on their website. So here it was: up to you. The beauty of the free market. Of individualism. Let our will and financial motivations be our only guides.

I asked friends, family. They all told me that by that time, to them it was obvious: I had already made my mind. I couldn’t see it yet. I cried. I cried over not being able to choose. Poor individualistic white girl. Not being able to accept what it meant, to live where we put business and profit first. Overwhelmed by the fear of never being hired by this organization again… Take more Diazepam and shut up already.

That night, the French government announced it will close schools. I knew how reluctant they had been. I couldn’t sleep.

In the morning I knew what I’d do. I went to the breakfast restaurant with my mobile phone to type that email I was dreading. All around me, people were reading on their phones and tablets the latest news on coronavirus. They discussed it nervously over tea. They all seemed annoyed that perhaps they wouldn’t be able to enter their destination country. I didn’t hear anyone say: “Okay, you know what? Let’s cancel. Let’s go home.” Oh, I know. They had worked so hard. Saved for months. You hear that about the climate emergency too. “Why should I not travel if everybody else does? What is it going to change, just one more person, huh?”

And indeed people brushed doubts off: since it’s a pandemic, everyone, every country will get it eventually. So we might as well enjoy.

I sent that email.

I didn’t go.

Went back to my room, because checkout was at 12, and when the flight took off to Casablanca, I was fast asleep in my London bed.

I took the train home. Posted an update on social media, so my readers and followers knew there wouldn’t be any Moroccan travel updates this time around.

That’s when Moroccan authorities decided to stop all travellers from France from entering their country anyway. I had hoped this would happen. But as a French national living in and coming from the UK, they would have let me in. Rather than share the responsibility with the country I live in (I might be furious at their inaction, I also know it’d be an easy excuse, a way to make myself unaccountable) I knew what I’d have thought: you’re the only person responsible now. If something happens to any person you interact with, it’s all on you. Live with that.

And still, wasn’t it too late? If I was indeed carrying the virus, I could have contaminated the coach driver, the hotel staff, my fellow train passengers… Or I could have caught it and bring it home.

 

Last night, as I said earlier, the French government finally announced the closure of all “non-essential” shops, restaurants, cafes, cinemas and clubs. Today, my mom worked in one of the “essential shops”. A supermarket. They were given masks and gloves. Still. We’re all scared for her.

Like us all, I would have preferred not to experience it, but I also believe that this terrible health crisis will generate new forms of solidarity. More global forms of solidarity. I see people standing with workers who aren’t yet safe. I see people make beautiful gestures: helping someone with shopping, giving out books and films, offering to listen to those who need it, asking their governments to consider people we don’t think of, homeless people, prisoners. I see people explain that if you’re willing to flee to Africa at the very first risk for your life, or the life of your loved ones, you can never again deny entry to – or simply ignore – the thousands of refugees who only claim the right to live safely.

Sadly, though, these times also bring another excuse to blame everyone who doesn’t do exactly as you do, people who haven’t yet understood how dangerous their actions were… We put it down to individual responsibility (and stupidity): people who panic-buy are shamed on social media, along with pictures of their overfilled supermarket trolleys. People are called irresponsible for going out, spending one more night in restaurants “before the apocalypse”, as they say… Sure, I’d rather they hadn’t been out and had stayed indoors. While we can’t excuse such behaviour, we can probably understand it, however. “Look, why is it that not all countries do the same, if that’s really necessary?” Firstly, we have to demand that countries like the UK stop ignoring what they’re being told, the same way Italy kept asking for immediate measures in France. Secondly, many people haven’t yet got how unique the whole situation was, how different from any other threat. To them, drastic measures are only associated with countries at war or totalitarian States. (See Giorgio Agamben’s text, which had been much – and rightly – criticized since.) We can assume that if strict confining is indeed decided, the army and the police will likely get involved, with reinforced video surveillance systems too… Can we afford to not even consider for one minute how this power could be abused? It certainly doesn’t mean, “You’re right, go drink that pint in the pub while you should be at home” (many of the people still enjoying night life absolutely don’t care about fighting for people’s rights anyway, so they shouldn’t pretend they do now), and we need to act urgently, ask people to get the fuck home, as the internet has it, but let’s keep this discussion happening, too. Let’s find new ways to protest and ensure people are heard.

In addition, over the years, I’ve spoken to so many people who are convinced that their government will do nothing, absolutely nothing, was there to be a food shortage. Even in such a capitalist country as the UK, I want to believe that if it were to happen, a system would be put in place so that food is made available to everyone, especially the most vulnerable. Yet given what is being done by the State for homeless and poor people, I agree one can doubt such timely generosity… Hence the bulk buying.

Given how violently we have been silencing and ridiculing scientists for decades on topics as crucial as the climate emergency, it’s a bit difficult to ask everyone to listen to their expertise at once. Given what we’ve always been told about dictatorial States, what we’ve always considered our very specific (and superior) sense of freedom, acting as we please regardless of consequences in the name of Capitalism, people are not willing to let that go. You can’t teach someone for decades that all that matters is their own individual choices, and then suddenly expect them to think “community” first. Come on, in France, the only time we ever mention community is to criticize people who don’t “integrate” the way we’d like them to… Honestly? “Community” in France is almost a slur.

 

So what can we do? I am no scientist, so I’ll follow what doctors and experts keep saying: I’ll stay home as much as I can. When I’ll go out, I’ll do all I can too to avoid being a danger to others. But I hope we can drop the blaming game, study the politics of such individual choices to understand what they are and how to change them as quickly as we can. Let’s keep sharing those stats and important articles, let’s try to educate ourselves about what we should do. People who make individualistic choices may be morally wrong, they’re not irrational: they’re acting as they’ve only been taught to act. Also, I know it’s hard to accept, but people have different fears. Yes, I don’t like seeing a supermarket trolley full of toilet paper these days… But who am I to know that the customer doesn’t have mental health issues? I have mental health issues myself, OCD in particular being considered a disability because there are actions I can’t do, decisions I can’t make. It can take me a lot more time to understand something that will appear “obvious” to anyone else (as may have been clear from this very blog…). I sometimes make very poor choices because of my OCD and depressive episodes. I can panic very quickly over… well, anything, frankly. I have been “stuck” in a shop and needed external help to come get me out of there (thank you Quentin, I’m sorry for the unexciting life I’m offering you!)… Perhaps some of these people (I’m not naive, I said “some”) literally panicked while in the shop, even though they came for their normal shopping trip… Perhaps some of them thought strategically: “I’m in a high-risk group, so I’d rather keep my shop visits to a minimum. If I buy all these, perhaps I can avoid coming back for another month.” They don’t need all that toilet paper for a month, you say? That’s true. Perhaps they’re going to give it to their family, neighbours, I don’t know! I only hope they’re doing their best. And maybe they are just selfish. Maybe the fear of being called out publicly helps to not normalise such behaviour. Though I’ve never personally seen anyone go from being a selfish asshole to a generous soul because they saw their stupid face on the internet. I think they get frustrated and aggressive then, that’s all.

 

People have just as much contradictions as they’re being fed. Today in France, elections took place despite doctors advising strongly and explicitly against them. Public transport were running, many supermarkets open, markets crowded. People working for cleaning companies kept cleaning the spaces we take for granted. You want people to voluntarily self-isolate, when the government sends such contradictory messages? Yes, people should take their responsibilities. But one of our responsibilities, surely, is to stand together as much as we can. Please don’t call “anti-democratic” people who didn’t go out to vote today. Don’t tell them if the far right ever wins, it’ll be because of people like them. Don’t patronize them by saying they’re playing by the fascists’ rules. Equally, please don’t accuse people who did go out to vote they have killed your grandmother, when all they’ve heard since childhood is that not going out to vote is the most irresponsible act, the worst thing any citizen can do. Try your best, with what you’ve got, as my friend Pauline always says. Listen to medical recommendations. Accept that you may support things you never agreed with before, because never before have you experienced these serious worldwide circumstances. I mean, I never thought that once in my life I would be encouraging borders… And there I am, hoping countries do all they can to protect themselves and the countries around us… There I am, having always defended the right to meet and protest in the streets, now praying for people to find other ways to voice their demands…

I don’t know. At the end of the day, I still feel lost and overwhelmed.


Au temps de la pandémie: capitalisme, décisions et responsabilité individuelle

Tout d’abord, je veux vous envoyer toute ma compassion. Quels que soient les choix que vous fassiez, les décisions que vous preniez, je pense que là où on tombera tou·tes d’accord, c’est qu’on se sent complètement perdu·es et dépassé·es.

Depuis que l’Organisation mondiale de la santé a reconnu le Coronavirus Covid-19 comme étant une pandémie mercredi dernier, tout autour du monde des stratégies ont été dessinées, des mesures prises. Soyons clair·es : ne pas prendre de mesures (un peu ce que fait le Royaume-Uni en ce moment, en fait), c’est aussi choisir une stratégie. Le message que cela envoie est clair. Et c’est à ce message que je pense depuis 4 jours.

Pourquoi est-ce que je parle de ça sur un blog qui concerne les TOC, la dépression, le deuil ? Malheureusement pour le deuil, je pense que c’est évident. Je suis désolée pour toutes les familles qui auront à se dire au revoir bien trop tôt, sans pouvoir même, comble peut-être de cette douleur, se prendre dans les bras et s’embrasser… Concernant les TOC et la dépression : je pense à toutes les personnes qui, comme moi, en raison d’un trouble mental, trouvent extrêmement difficile, sinon purement impossible, de prendre des décisions sans se torturer, de faire le tri dans ce qu’on nous dit. Je pense à combien la situation doit être difficile, en ce moment, particulièrement pour les gens touchés par les TOC de vérification et d’hygiène. Combien il doit être difficile d’être hypocondriaque à l’heure qu’il est, ou d’avoir un autre problème de cet ordre. Je vous envoie ma solidarité, puisque je ne peux pas envoyer grand-chose d’autre…

 

Je suis française et vis au Royaume-Uni depuis 10 ans. Ces derniers jours, j’ai donc été particulièrement intéressée par les actions prises (ou non prises, justement) par la France et le Royaume-Uni. J’ai vu la France ignorer les efforts faits en Chine et les recommandations de doctoresses·eurs et scientifiques italien·nes, pensant qu’on était tellement plus malins qu’elles·ux… Maintenant, la France a annoncé la fermeture de toutes les écoles, commerces non-essentiels, restaurants, cafés, cinémas, et discothèques. Je pense que les transports en commun sont les prochains sur la liste. (J’espère qu’ils le sont.) Au Royaume-Uni, sûrement encouragé par l’atmosphère du Brexit, le gouvernement de Boris Johnson persiste à agir comme s’il n’avait aucune mesure à prendre. L’Europe est certes le centre de l’épidémie, mais le Royaume-Uni ne fait pas partie de l’Europe, voyons, n’est-il pas ? Oh, ils finiront par agir. Je suis sûre (j’espère) qu’ils le feront. Mais pourquoi prendre si longtemps ? Même simplement pour montrer que la population est importante à leurs yeux?

La raison pour laquelle le Royaume-Uni ne fait rien (saluons tout de même l’Écosse pour ce qu’elle a fait) est la même raison pour laquelle la France n’a pas agi plus tôt. Ces pays protègent d’abord le capitalisme. Vous imaginez les circonstances dramatiques pour les entreprises si le pays entier était mis en confinement ? Oui, je peux vaguement imaginer, en fait. Vous aussi. Parce que c’est notre système ; chaque décision prise par notre gouvernement ne l’est jamais que pour servir, avant tout (ou en tout cas ne pas déstabiliser) notre système économique. C’est pour ça que je pense qu’on ne pourra jamais avoir de gouvernement véritablement de gauche à la tête de nos pays : on lui demandera d’abord, malgré tout, d’encourager les investissements et la production, les emplois peu chers et la consommation de masse… Mais ne faisons pas que pointer le haut de la pyramide. C’est à cela aussi que nous somme habitué·es en tant que citoyen·nes, et beaucoup d’entre nous ne sont pas prêt·es à changer ce style de vie : nous voulons pouvoir aller dans un magasin quasiment quand on le souhaite, où qu’on soit, pour acheter quelque chose qu’on désire, mais dont nous n’avons aucun besoin. Nous voulons pouvoir noter les prestations et, la plupart du temps (c’est surtout vrai au Royaume-Uni), cela fait de nous des consommatrices·eurs plutôt que des usager·es (par rapport aux écoles, aux bibliothèques, aux services publics). Nous voulons qu’on nous livre en toute praticité notre nourriture, ou qu’on nous la serve dans des restaurants. Nous voulons prendre ce café à notre Starbucks habituel. Nous voulons pouvoir parcourir des kilomètres pour la seule raison qu’on le peut, alors pourquoi pas? Voilà comment on vit. Je ne parle pas des gens qui n’ont pas d’autres choix que de compter sur une aide extérieure. Les personnes handicapées peuvent avoir besoin qu’on leur livre leur nourriture, leurs courses, et qu’on fasse le ménage pour elles. Je parle des désirs, non des besoins. C’est cela, le capitalisme. Nous faire croire, à force d’habitude, que ces désirs sont des besoins, alors qu’ils ne le sont absolument pas.

Je ne peux pas parler des autres pays, mais en France et au Royaume-Uni, l’impact d’un lockdown est à peine imaginable. Regardez à quel point les gens sont horrifiés de voir les rues désertes de l’Italie. Voyez comment les client·es (souvent blanc·hes et aisé·es) réagissent, sur un continent où ils et elles ont pris l’habitude de voyager comme bon leur semblait, quand on leur dit qu’une frontière leur restera fermée, ou que leur station de ski doit être évacuée. Regardez ces visages quand ils et elles prennent conscience que ça n’était pas simplement la vie quotidienne, ça, mais l’expression d’un privilège. Une crise sanitaire. C’est tout ce qu’il aura fallu pour qu’on soit bien obligé·es de s’en rendre compte.

Tout est lié. Fermez les usines et interdisez les imports, et les magasins seront bientôt vides (encore que vu notre surproduction et notre surconsommation, je suis sûre qu’on en aurait pour plus longtemps qu’on ne le pense…). Interdisez les transports en commun, et les gens doivent réapprendre à vivre leur espace. Je suis comme vous tou·tes. Je n’ai pas l’habitude de ça non plus. Je me déplace beaucoup. Reste rarement plus de six mois au même endroit. Bien que j’aie un chez moi (un chez moi que j’aime, avec une personne que j’adore), donnez-moi une seule opportunité et je sauterais dessus. On dirait quand même que là, je risque de moins sauter pendant quelques temps.

 

Il y a trois jours, je devais partir au Maroc pour le travail. J’avais passé des mois (et beaucoup d’argent) à préparer ce voyage. J’avais eu plusieurs visites médicales en raison de mon profil, et payé une assurance voyage ultra chère (laissez-moi vous dire que la combinaison diabète + TOC + dépression, les assurances n’aiment pas beaucoup). J’avais hâte. J’étais sur le point de rencontrer des gens géniaux et de visiter des lieux que je n’avais jamais vus. Jusqu’à mercredi, j’étais si débordée par les préparatifs que je n’avais pas encore bien écouté les informations, ou je n’avais pas pris le temps de les écouter correctement. Je savais que ça n’allait pas fort en Italie. J’utilise Twitter, quand même. Je savais qu’on nous disait au Royaume-Uni de bien nous laver les mains régulièrement, et je le faisais, bien sûr. Je ne toussais pas, mais je savais que si je toussais, je devais le faire dans mon coude. Des procédures assez standards, somme toute. Ayant travaillé dans le commerce et en bibliothèque, c’est quelque chose qu’on nous apprend, afin de ne surtout pas passer ça aux collègues, client·es ou usager.es. N’utilisez de mouchoirs qu’une fois, mettez-les dans les toilettes et tirez la chasse, ce genre de trucs. Mais mercredi, l’OMS m’a obligée à écouter : c’était bien une pandémie.

Jeudi matin, je me suis réveillée dans un autre état d’esprit : maintenant que mon sac était prêt, que j’étais moi-même prête à partir, maintenant seulement me venait cette question : est-ce que je dois vraiment y aller ? Mon avion partait vendredi matin, et parce que je ne voulais pas le rater et que je ne conduis pas, j’avais réservé une chambre la veille dans un hôtel de l’aéroport de Londres Gatwick.

J’ai passé ma dernière matinée à la maison à lire des recommandations de voyage sur les sites officiels et pas si officiels que ça. Trump venait d’annoncer que tous les vols en provenance de l’Europe étaient interdits (excepté ceux du Royaume-Uni, parce que c’était évidemment un message politique). Je n’avais jamais partagé une seule opinion avec Trump, et voilà que je me disais que c’était peut-être pas si bête… Pas concernant le Royaume-Uni, évidemment, mais plutôt concernant ces voyages qu’on pouvait éviter. Mon voyage était lié à un contrat de travail, donc en effet c’était un peu plus compliqué qu’un voyage d’agrément, mais il n’était pas vital ou indispensable. J’ai regardé les sites de tous les aéroports que je connaissais, au Royaume-Uni, en France et au Maroc, pour voir l’influence que cela avait sur les vols actuels. Mis à part les vols en provenance de et à destination de l’Italie, ils n’étaient en fait vraiment pas affectés. J’ai passé beaucoup de temps à rattraper les nouvelles que franchement, j’avais négligé, consciemment ou non. J’ai lu les revues de presse des deux dernières semaines, confronté des sources venant de pays différents, en anglais comme en français. À 13h, je devais partir pour avoir mon car. Je suis partie. Mes jambs tremblaient. Mais ayant des TOC, je ne savais pas si j’avais une réaction exagérée en raison de mes TOC, ou si c’était la réaction à avoir. Je n’arrivais pas à décider quoi faire, mais c’est un peu mon comportement habituel, pour être honnête. Était-ce parce qu’il n’y avait aucune directives claires, et des contradictions partout autour de nous ? Ou parce que je me torture quant à la plus banale des décisions ? Est-ce que j’étais juste ridicule ? Irrationnelle ? Est-ce que j’étais en train de paniquer? Ou la situation était-elle aussi grave qu’elle en avait l’air, et ma décision à ne surtout pas prendre à la légère?

Alors que j’étais dans le car, mes futurs collègues m’ont appelée. Ils ont compris mes craintes. Jusqu’ici, il n’y avait eu que six cas de coronavirus déclarés au Maroc. Six. Ici, au Royaume-Uni, ils parlaient de 500 cas, mais je savais qu’il y en avait bien plus. Quelqu’un avait parlé d’un chiffre compris entre 5 000 et 10 000. Je n’avais aucun symptôme (car dans ce cas-là, il n’y aurait eu aucun doute quant à ce qu’il fallait faire), mais on peut être vectrice du virus pendant plusieurs jours sans le savoir… Si je franchissais cette frontière, et que j’amenais avec moi le pire invité surprise ? Pouvez-vous honnêtement supporter d’être responsable de la propagation d’une pandémie au sein d’un pays encore presque intouché ?

J’ai donc lu des choses à propos de voyages. Des gens qui ne voulaient pas rater leurs vacances. J’ai lu comment les Europén·nes refusait d’admettre ce que ça signifiait, de vivre à l’épicentre de l’épidémie, alors qu’on avait toujours été si prompt·es à condamner les autres pays… J’ai lu comment en raison d’Ebola, les gens venant d’Afrique n’étaient plus les bienvenu·es en Europe, et comment nous, avec nos foyers épidémiques fort documentés, on continuait de visiter Cuba, la Tunisie, l’Argentine, sans se poser aucune question. J’ai lu qu’en Afrique, en particulier, la grande majorité des cas de covid-19 avaient été introduits par des touristes… Pas par des gens rendant visite à leur famille, venant pour un mariage ou des funérailles, non. Des touristes. Y a-t-il jamais eu de meilleur synonyme pour « voyage non indispensable » ? Certain·es en profitaient apparemment pour bénéficier de prix défiant toute concurrence sur les croisières, les vols, les circuits. Ça n’aurait pas pu être plus clair : la seule raison pour laquelle on ne fermait pas les frontières (et dieu sait que je crois en un monde sans frontière) ni n’annulions tous les vols, c’était notre soumission au capitalisme. Le capitalisme, tel que nous le connaissons, s’est construit sur le système colonial. Cette idée que le monde, le ciel même, nous appartient à nous, Europen·nes blanc·hes. Que c’est notre droit le plus essentiel que de « circuler librement ». Mais qui circule librement ? Je pouvais aller au Maroc juste comme ça, avec un passeport en cours de validité, et y rester trois mois si je voulais, pas de questions merci. Les ressortissants marocain·es doivent obtenir des visas chers et fort limités pour simplement quelques jours à Paris… J’avais passé l’année précédente dans les pas de Montaigne, à écrire sur le lien entre voyage (et en particulier écrit de voyage) et privilège. Est-ce que je devais ignorer tout ce que j’avais écrit, tout ce en quoi je croyais, aussi, sous le simple prétexte que j’avais vraiment envie de faire ce voyage-ci ? Je ne voulais pas faire faux bond à mes employeurs. Perdre cette somme d’argent que j’avais engagée me faisait peur, aussi. Des facteurs financiers. Comment peut-on comparer ça à des vies humaines ?

En tant que personne qui prend très difficilement des décisions, ça va dégoûter les plus gauchos d’entre vous, mais c’est plus facile pour moi quand il y a une directive claire sur laquelle je peux m’appuyer… J’espèrais qu’on en publie une, qui dirait qu’à compter de ce jour, personne ne pourrait plus quitter le Royaume-Uni ou y pénétrer par avion, sauf dans les cas de déplacements essentiels. Malheureusement pour moi, cette directive n’arriva pas. La page gouvernementale concernant les voyages à l’étranger précisait même clairement qu’on n’aurait droit à aucun remboursement si on annulait son voyage pour une destination qui n’était pas listée sur le site. Alors voilà : c’était à nous de voir. La beauté du capitalisme et de son libre marché. La beauté de l’individualisme. Laissons nos volontés et nos intérêts financiers être nos seuls guides.

J’ai demandé leur avis à des ami·es, à ma famille. Ils et elles m’ont tou·tes dit que pour eux·lles, c’était évident : à cette heure-là, j’avais déjà pris ma décision. Mais moi, je ne le voyais pas. J’ai pleuré. Pleuré parce que je n’arrivais pas à decider. Pauvre petite blanche individuelle. Qui a peur de ne plus jamais être embauchée par cette structure. Prends pluis de Diazepam et ferme ta gueule.

Cette nuit-là, le gouvernement français a annoncé qu’il fermerait les écoles. Je savais à quel point cette décision les avait fait hésiter. Je n’ai pas dormi.

Au matin, je savais quoi faire. Je me suis rendue à la salle du petit-déjeuner avec mon téléphone pour écrire cet email que je redoutais. Tout autour de moi, les gens lisaient sur leur téléphone, leur tablette, les dernières nouvelles concernant le coronavirus. Ils en parlaient nerveusement devant leur tasse de thé. Ils avaient l’air embêtés, peut-être ne les laisserait-on pas entrer dans leur pays de destination. Mais je n’ai entendu personne dire : « Okay, tu sais quoi, viens on annule tout. Rentrons à la maison. » Oh, je comprends. Ils avaient travaillé dur. Économisé pendant des mois. On entend ça à propos de l’urgence climatique, également. “Pourquoi est-ce que moi je ne devrais pas voyager alors que tout le monde le fait? Qu’est-ce que ça change, une personne, hein ? »

Et les gens repoussaient ainsi leurs doutes : comme il s’agissait d’une pandémie, tout le monde, tous les pays du monde, finiraient par être touchés. Alors tant qu’à faire, autant profiter.

J’ai envoyé mon email.

Je ne suis pas partie.

Je suis retournée dans ma chambre, j’avais jusqu’à midi pour la libérer, et à l’heure où décollait l’avion pour Casablanca, je dormais à poings fermés.

J’ai pris le train pour rentrer à la maison. Posté la nouvelle sur les réseaux sociaux, pour que mes lecteurs·rices et followeurs·euses sachent qu’il n’y aurait pas cette fois de journal de voyage marocain.

C’est à cette heure-là que les autorités marocaines ont décidé d’arrêter tous les voyageurs en provenance de France, de toute façon. J’avais espéré que ça arriverait. Mais en tant que citoyenne française habitant au et partant du Royaume-Uni, on m’aurait laissée rentrer. Plutôt que de partager cette responsabilité avec le pays d’où je venais (j’ai beau être furieuse vis-à-vis de son inaction, je sais aussi que c’est une manière facile de se dédouaner, c’est le cas de le dire, tiens) je sais ce que j’aurais pensé : voilà, c’est toi la seule responsable, maintenant. Si quelque chose arrive à n’importe laquelle des personnes que tu rencontreras, ça seras de ta faute. Allez, vis avec ça.

Et de toute façon, n’était-ce pas trop tard ? Si j’étais porteuse du virus, j’avais pu contaminer le chauffeur de bus, les employé·es de l’hôtel, les passagers de mon wagon… J’aurais aussi pu l’attraper et le ramener à la maison.

 

Hier soir, comme je l’écrivais plus haut, le gouvernement français a finalement annoncé la fermeture de tous les commerces « non-essentiels », des restaurants, des cafés, des cinémas et des discothèques. Aujourd’hui, ma mère travaillait dans un supermarché. On leur a donné des masques et des gants. J’ai peur pour elle malgré tout.

Comme nous tou·tes, j’auaris préféré ne pas vivre ça, mais je crois aussi que cette terrible crise sanitaire générera de nouvelles formes de solidarité, une solidarité plus globale. Je vois les gens soutenir les travailleur·ses encore non protégé·es. Je les vois faire des gestes : aider quelqu’un avec ses courses, offrir des livres ou des films, demander au gouvernement de penser à celles et ceux à qui on ne pense jamais : les sans-domiciles, les détenu·es. Je vois les gens expliquer que si tu es prêt·e à courir te réfugier en Afrique au premier risque pour ta vie, tu n’as plus le droit de refuser ni même de simplement ignorer les milliers de réfugié·es qui ne demandent que le droit à vivre en sécurité.

Malheureusement, les circonstances offrent aussi une occasion de plus d’insulter tous les gens qui ne font pas exactement comme nous, qui n’ont pas tout de suite compris le danger de leurs actions… Nous mettons tout sur le dos de la responsabilité (ou stupidité) individuelle : les gens qui achètent des quantités énormes sous une certaine panique sont montrés sur les réseaux sociaux, avec la photo de leurs chariots trop remplis. Les gens sont qualifiés d’irresponsables quand ils sortent une dernière nuit au restaurant, « avant l’apocalypse » comme ils disent… Bien sûr, j’aurais préféré qu’ils ne le fassent pas et restent chez eux. Pourtant sans l’excuser, on peut probablement comprendre pourquoi ils le font. « Attendez, pourquoi tous les pays ne font pas la même chose, si c’est si grave que ça et que c’est la seule chose à faire ? » D’une part, exigeons des pays comme le Royaume-Uni d’arrêter d’ignorer la gravité des faits, comme l’Italie l’a répété à la France ces derniers jours. D’autre part, tellement de gens n’ont pas compris le caractère absolument unique de ce qui se passe actuellement. Pour eux, les mesures de confinement drastiques sont le propre des pays en guerre, des états dictatoriaux (lisez à ce sujet le texte de Giorgio Agamben, très justement critiqué depuis). On peut supposer que si le confinement strict doit en effet être mis en place, l’armée et la police seront certainement réquisitionnées, avec des systèmes de vidéosurveillance renforcés… Peut-on vraiment se permettre de ne pas se poser cinq minutes la question de possibles dérives ? Cela ne veut certainement pas dire : « T’as raison, va boire ta bière au bar alors que tu devrais rester chez toi » (beaucoup se fichent complètement d’habitude de la défense de leurs droits, alors qu’ils ne viennent pas faire semblant maintenant). Nous devons agir très vite, demander aux gens de stay the fuck home, comme le dit si bien internet, mais laissons aussi cette conversation avoir lieu. Trouvons d’autres moyens de manifester et de faire en sorte que les gens soient écoutés.

De plus, au fil des ans, j’ai parlé à beaucoup de gens qui sont persuadés que leur gouvernement ne ferait rien, absolument rien, en cas de pénurie de nourriture. Même dans un pays aussi capitaliste que le Royaume-Uni, j’ai envie de croire que si cela arrivait, un système serait mis en place pour que de la nourriture soit mise à disposition de tou·tes, en particulier les plus vulnérables. Mais vu ce que fait l’Etat concernant les sans-domiciles et les pauvres, je conviens aisément qu’on puisse douter d’une telle générosité… D’où les rayons dévalisés.

Étant donné à quel point on fait taire et on décrédibilise depuis des décennies les scientifiques pour des sujets aussi graves que l’urgence climatique, difficile aujourd’hui d’imposer aux gens de s’en remettre illico à leur expertise. Étant donné tout ce qu’on nous a toujours dit des États dictatoriaux, ce qu’on a toujours considéré comme notre sens très spécifique (et supérieur) de la liberté, nous permettant de faire ce qui nous chante sans jamais nous soucier des conséquences au nom de notre dieu capitalisme, les gens ne sont pas prêts à lâcher si vite. On ne peut pas apprendre aux gens pendant des décennies que tout ce qui compte, ce sont leurs choix individuels, et tout à coup attendre d’eux qu’ils pensent d’abord en terme de « communauté ». En France, les seules fois où on emploie même ce mot, c’est pour critiquer les personnes qui ne « s’intègrent » pas comme on voudrait qu’elles le fassent. Honnêtement ? « Communauté », en France, c’est quasiment une insulte.

 

Alors, que peut-on faire ? Je ne suis pas scientifique, alors je suivrai ce que médecins et expert·es ne cessent de répéter : je resterai à la maison autant que je le pourrai. Quand je sortirai, je ferai tout ce que je peux pour ne pas représenter un danger pour les autres. J’espère aussi qu’on peut arrêter le jeu des accusations, politiser ces choix individuels pour en comprendre la portée mais aussi savoir comment les modifier aussi vite que possible. Continuons de partager les statistiques qui circulent et les articles importants, continuons de nos éduquer sur ce que l’on doit faire. Les gens qui font des choix individualistes font peut-être des choix immoraux, mais pas irrationnels : ils agissent comme on le leur a toujours appris. Parallèlement, et c’est dur à accepter, les gens n’ont pas tous les mêmes peurs. Certes, je n’aime pas voir les caddies de supermarché du moment, débordant de papier toilette… Mais qui suis-je pour dire que ces gens-là n’ont pas aussi des troubles psychologiques ? Je suis moi-même atteinte de ces troubles, les TOC en particulier étant considérés comme un handicap car il y a des choses que je ne peux pas faire, des décisions que je ne peux pas prendre. Ça peut me prendre plus longtemps de comprendre quelque chose qui paraîtra à tout le monde « évident ». Je fais parfois de très mauvais choix en raison de mes TOC et de mes épisodes de dépression. Je peux paniquer très vite face à… n’importe quoi, en fait. On a déjà dû venir me chercher dans un grand magasin (merci Quentin, pardon encore pour ces rebondissements que je t’inflige dans ma vie trépidante !) car j’étais « coincée »… Peut-être que certains de ces gens (je ne suis pas naïve, je n’ai pas dit tous…) ont littéralement paniqué une fois dans le magasin, alors qu’ils venaient pour leurs courses habituelles. Peut-être aussi que certains pensent stratégiquement : « J’appartiens à une population à risque, donc je dois faire en sorte de ne pas venir ici trop souvent. Si j’achète tout ça, peut-être puis-je éviter de revenir pendant tout un mois. » Ils n’ont pas besoin de tout ce papier toilette pour un mois, dites-vous ? En effet. Peut-être qu’ils en donneront à leur famille, leurs voisin·es, je ne sais pas ! J’espère qu’ils font de leur mieux. Et peut-être qu’ils sont juste égoïstes. Et peut-être en effet que la peur de se faire défoncer en public permet de ne pas normaliser ce type de comportement. Mais pour tout vous dire, je n’ai jamais vu un ignoble connard nombriliste devenir une âme des plus généreuses simplement parce qu’il avait vu sa sale face sur internet. Je pense que ça les rend frustrés et agressifs, pas grand-chose d’autre.

 

Les gens révèlent autant de contradictions qu’on leur en a donné pour se construire. Aujourd’hui, en France, des élections ont eu lieu contre l’avis des médecins. Les transports en commun fonctionnaient, beaucoup de supermarchés étaient ouverts, les marchés étaient pleins. Les personnes travaillant pour des sociétés d’entretien ont continué à nettoyer les espaces que l’on prend pour acquis. On veut que la population s’auto-confine, alors que le gouvernement envoie de telles informations contradictoires ? Oui, chacun·e doit prendre ses responsabilités. Mais l’une de nos responsabilités, c’est sûrement de rester solidaires autant que possible. S’il vous plaît, n’appelez pas « anti-démocratiques » les personnes qui ne sont pas allées voter aujourd’hui. Ne leur dites pas que si l’extrême-droite passe un jour, ça sera à cause de gens comme eux. Arrêtez votre condescendance, quand vous dites qu’ils jouent le jeu des fascistes. De la même façon, n’accusez pas les personnes qui sont allées voter d’avoir tué votre grand-mère, alors qu’on leur répète depuis l’enfance que c’est ne pas voter qui est un geste irresponsable, la pire chose qu’un·e citoyen·e puisse faire. Faites de votre mieux avec ce que vous avez, comme dit toujours mon amie Pauline. Écoutez les recommandations médicales. Acceptez que vous défendrez peut-être des choses avec lesquelles vous n’aviez jusqu’à présent jamais été d’accord, puisque vous n’avez jamais eu à les considérer à la lumières de circonstances internationales si difficiles. Franchement, je n’aurais jamais pensé qu’un jour je défendrai les frontières… Et voici que j’espère que les différents pays feront tout ce qu’ils pourront afin de se protéger eux-mêmes, et de protéger les pays qui les entourent… Voici qu’ayant toujours défendu le nécessité de se rassembler et de manifester dans les rues, je prie que les gens trouvent un autre moyen, là tout de suite, d’exprimer leur revendications…

Je ne sais pas. Au fond, je reste perdue. Dépassé.é.

Top

When the day bleeds

french flag pastel

Got home safe at last after a 13-hour delay due to storm Ciara. Was feeling relieved, if a little tired, and ready to get back to work. I just thought I’d watch a couple music videos while drinking a cup of tea first. Played “Someone you loved” by Lewis Capaldi, didn’t know what it was really about but my mom loves this song. I got from the words that it was a sad one, obviously, but still I didn’t expect anything like this… Or perhaps it’s my reaction to it I didn’t expect.

This video broke me. I mean I’m fine, I absolutely am because that’s just life, we’ll all have to experience grief one day, there’s nothing more common or banal, infuriatingly. The ordinary, too, can overflow its banks. But it’s funny how much you think that it’s all fine now, that the “keeping going” part is not as excruciating as it used to be, when suddenly you feel this acute pain – a pain no time or love can heal. This all too banal pain of knowing you’ll never see that one person smile again.

If a Ryanair plane can take off and land safely in a storm, surely, I should be able to go back to work after crying watching a 4-minute video, shouldn’t I? I should be. I will. I’m just a different kind of machine. Who needs to stop pressing the wrong buttons. Or perhaps to accept that I’m pressing them unconsciously, when somehow I know I need to. Grieving doesn’t have to fit into our neat, busy schedule. Sometimes, it may be okay to let it bleed into our day.

“For now the day bleeds
Into nightfall
And you’re not here
To get me through it all.
I let my guard down
And then you pulled the rug
I was getting kinda used to being someone you loved.”


When the day bleeds

Enfin rentrée à la maison après un retard de 13 heures en raison de la tempête Ciara, je me sentais soulagée, bien qu’un peu fatiguée, enfin prête à me remettre au travail. Je m’étais dit qu’avant, j’allais juste regarder deux ou trois clips en buvant une tasse de thé. J’ai lancé celui de “Someone you loved”, de Lewis Capaldi, je ne savais pas vraiment de quoi parlait la chanson, mais ma mère l’adore. J’avais évidemment compris à travers les paroles que c’était une chanson triste, mais bon dieu, je ne m’attendais pas à un tel clip… Ou peut-être que c’est à ma réaction que je ne m’attendais pas.

Cette courte vidéo m’a brisée en deux. En fait ça va, je vais bien, c’est juste la vie, on aura tou.te.s à vivre un deuil un jour, il n’y a rien de plus commun, de plus banal. L’ordinaire, lui aussi, peut déborder. Mais c’est marrant à quel point on arrive à croire que c’est bon, maintenant, que le “continuer” n’est plus si violent qu’il ne l’était, avant de ressentir d’un coup cette douleur aiguë, une douleur qu’aucune durée, qu’aucun amour ne peut guérir. Cette douleur tellement ordinaire de savoir que cette personne-là ne sourira jamais plus.

Si un avion Ryanair peut décoller et atterrir sans encombres à travers une tempête, je dois bien être capable de me remettre au travail après avoir chialé en regardant une vidéo de 4 minutes, non? Mais oui. J’en suis capable. Je suis juste un autre type de machine. Qui doit arrêter d’actionner les mauvais boutons. Ou alors, comprendre que je les actionne quand inconsciemment, j’en ressens le besoin. Vivre un deuil n’a pas à rentrer dans nos emplois du temps à la fois chargés et parfaitement calibrés. Ressentir le deuil, c’est aussi accepter de le laisser parfois saigner sur nos jours.

“Pour l’heure le jour saigne
colorant la nuit
Et tu n’es pas là
Pour le traverser avec moi.
Ma garde baissée,
Le sol s’ouvrant sous mes pas,
Je m’habituais tout juste à être aimé.e de toi”

Top

On Failing

french flag pastel

Because I have two books published, and have received awards, funding, and invitations at various events for my writing, it is quite common for people to see me as someone who always – or at least very often – succeeds. I’m extremely happy about any of my accomplishments, but although I would love this success story to be true, it simply isn’t.

At least there isn’t in the UK this toxic idea that France still encourage so readily: that writers are inspired geniuses, who just sit there for a while, wait for some divine inspiration to strike, and then write their whole new book in a week, or a new poem in 20 minutes, and it’s read worldwide at once, and we’re all in awe of such great minds. Well, I don’t know about other people, and I’m sure it’s different for everyone, but I sure have to work very hard every time I write a text, however short. I work for hours, weeks, on a piece of just 20 lines. The heartbreaking thing being that I may have worked for hours for a text that is just, well… not good. And I know I won’t be using it. So it ends up in the bin. And I start all over again.

When I do find the text good, though, after my perfectionism has visited numerous times, I usually want to use it for something. To publish it somewhere. Easy, you think? Haha. I wish. No, I mean, I truly wish, I’m not going to lie. I’d love to have that amount of social recognition that means every single thing you write is going to be accepted in acclaimed magazines as soon as you email the editor. I would even love to be famous enough to know that every single book I write is going to be a best-seller. Not because of the fame or applause, but because I could actually make a living out of my writing, and never need another job ever again. That’s my absolute fantasy: write and read all day. No need for an idyllic location or overflowing bank account, just write whenever I like.
That is so not my situation, however. I write because I can’t imagine a single week without writing. Like I can’t imagine not reading for more than two days in a row. And because I want my texts to exist for others too, I try to get my text published. And it’s a hard, competitive, often discouraging process.

It’s a bit like your stats on your blog. I love my blogs, and because I’m active on social media, I’m sure some people think my blogs are read every day by hundreds of people. Hahaha! They’re so not! And that’s okay. But honestly, we need to stop that obsession and shame about blog stats: sometimes, my blogs aren’t visited by a single person for days. Sometimes, I get one visit in a full week. Nonetheless, I still love blogging, and will keep doing it. Of course I’d love to be read more often, by more people. I mean, come on, why would you use blogging if that wasn’t to find readers? But I’m fine with things as they are, and I want to reassure the many bloggers or social media fans I’ve met: the vast majority of blogs have an extremely small number of readers. And it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t exist.


I want to say all this because I often read interviews where writers say: ‘this is the very first time I enter a competition, so I couldn’t really believe it when I was told I got the first prize and later sold 300,000 copies of my book, now translated in 28 languages.’ These people are amazing and I’m truly happy for them! Actually, I usually read their work, because I think it must be exceptional on some level to have been spotted on their very first try. But that’s not me. I have sent my writing to so many competitions, magazines, journals, without even being shortlisted. I know I shouldn’t say this. Because the first thing you’d think, then, is: ‘well, that just means your writing wasn’t good enough’. I honestly think sometimes, it was true, and I worked again on my piece and made it way better. But I think that most of the times, rejection came for many, many other reasons: there are so many entries, and so many brilliant entries, even when you entered with your best piece it may not be spotted among the hundreds of submissions. And another judge may have shortlisted you, but not that one. All of this to say, my work has been rejected dozens of times. Maybe hundreds if I count every competition I entered since I was 14, every publisher I contacted, every journal I emailed my poems to. I just keep working.

So when I announce some great news on social media, it means that it’s one of these rare occurrences when I received an email starting with: ‘Congratulations’. And I’m bursting with joy and gratefulness, honestly I am. I then try to give a real existence to every single piece of work that manages to get out there. Because we all know a text is nothing if not read. So after having worked on getting a piece published, I work on getting this text to potential readers. And because I don’t believe in straightforward, opportunistic self-publicity, it takes an incredibly high amount of time, energy, and patience. But that’s okay. It’s all part of the job, and it’s a job I just wish I could do more.


You see, we’re quite far from the story people usually expect me to tell: ‘Oh, I sent it to that one publisher, they thought it was the most amazing thing they had read since Flaubert, so they decided to publish my text and offer me a five-digit salary’.

Yet I’m not finished. I like to be challenged and try new things, therefore I send a lot of emails, letters, and parcels – many places still don’t accept electronic submissions. More often than not, what I get is a simple type-thing rejection. ‘We are sorry to let you know that after careful consideration…’ And every single time, I have to deal with disappointment. It doesn’t get any easier. Every single time, I’m deeply disappointed, because of course I wouldn’t even consider submitting something if I didn’t believe in it. If I didn’t believe it could get read, selected, published, I wouldn’t waste anyone else’s time. So the thing I’ve done most, as a writer, is learn to live with disappointment and multiple failures. These days, the word ‘failure’ is not particularly trending. We want to make it more positive, ‘oh, but you learnt something from it’. Hell, yeah, but mostly, the lesson was about being disappointed again. Of course I keep going. Of course. But every single time, sorry if I appear childish or arrogant, it hurts. You may know on a rational level not to take things personally, but especially if you feel down at that time, that all sounds like a beautiful lie. I don’t show it because you don’t have time to really show it, you need to work on your writing.


I’ve talked mainly about writing, but it was the same for job applications. I have a PhD, so you see, it’s something people usually associate with an extremely successful life. Though I’ve been rejected many times for positions I really thought I could get, and god knows I doubt myself. I’ve been to interviews and thought it went really well for once, only to have the rejection email waiting three hours later in my inbox. That was freaking hard. Much more so than the writing, because it was of course a question of financial necessity, there: I needed to work, if only just to pay my rent. And yet: ‘no’, ‘no’, ‘no’, ‘no’. Sometimes ‘yes’, but mostly: ‘no’.

So I want to destroy a few myths here.
1. Most people, even the most successful ones, are not successful all the time. Of course they live with rejection. Probably a lot of them, actually. The only thing is: they don’t talk about it.
2. You can’t always turn a failure into something positive. And that’s fine, because it’s not supposed to be. Sometimes, it just sucks. Awesome people around you, I’m sure, will be happy to hear you say just that, and won’t insist on your ‘looking on the bright side’.
3. But in order to sometimes succeed, to get your art and ideas considered, you need to be prepared for rejection. Not as in ‘oh I don’t care, resentment and bitterness is something I never feel’ (who are these people?!), but ‘one day, it will work, because I’ll bloody work for it until it works’.


I don’t believe in inspiration as the main source of writing, or success. I believe in dedication, focus, tenacity. Sorry, it certainly doesn’t sound as romantic. I know I still have many failures ahead of me. I’d love not to, but I’m not naive. I won’t pretend it won’t hurt. I know that every single time it will be painful. But hey, I’ll keep going, and want to encourage you to do the same, because I suspect we are in fact the vast majority. Nothing unusual here, so keep trying.


À propos de l’échec

Parce que j’ai publié deux livres, et que j’ai reçu des distinctions, des bourses et des invitations à divers événements du fait de mon écriture, il est relativement courant que les gens me voient comme quelqu’un qui réussit toujours (ou du moins très souvent) ce qu’elle entreprend. Je suis infiniment heureuse de chaque chose que j’ai accomplie, mais bien que j’aimerais que cette histoire de succès soit la mienne, ça n’est absolument pas le cas.

Au moins, il n’y a pas au Royaume-Uni cette idée toxique qu’on encourage si volontiers en France : celle selon laquelle les écrivain·e·s ne sont que des génies inspirés, qui s’assoient juste un moment, attendent l’inspiration divine, et hop écrivent leur nouveau livre en une semaine, ou un nouveau poème en 20 minutes, et ce texte est lu dans le monde entier dans la foulée, et nous voilà en admiration béate devant de si grands esprits. Alors, je ne sais pas pour les autres, et je suis sûre que ça dépend tout simplement des gens, mais en tout cas pour ma part je dois travailler dur et longtemps à chaque fois que j’écris un texte, même s’il est court. Je travaille pendant des heures, des semaines, sur un texte de vingt lignes. Et le pire, c’est qu’il est possible que j’aie passé tout ce temps sur un texte qui n’est tout simplement… pas bon. Et je sais que je n’en ferai rien. Il part à la poubelle, et je recommence à nouveau.

Quand je pense que le texte est bon, cependant, après que mon perfectionnisme soit venu me rendre ses fréquentes visites, généralement j’espère en faire quelque chose. Le publier quelque part. Facile, vous dites ? Haha. J’aimerais bien. Non, je suis sérieuse là, j’aimerais vraiment, je ne vais pas mentir. J’aimerais beaucoup avoir ce niveau de reconnaissance sociale qui fait que chaque chose qu’on écrit sera accepté dans les magazines les plus reconnus, dès que son éditeur·trice reçoit notre courriel. J’aimerais même être suffisamment célèbre pour savoir que n’importe quel livre que je publierai sera un best-seller. Ni pour la gloire ni pour les lauriers, mais parce que je pourrais alors en vivre, d’écrire, et que je n’aurais plus jamais besoin d’avoir un autre emploi à côté. C’est mon grand fantasme : écrire et lire toute la journée. Pas besoin d’un lieu paradisiaque ou d’un compte en banque plein à craquer, juste pouvoir écrire quand je le souhaite.

Or ça n’est pas, mais alors pas du tout, ma situation. J’écris car je ne peux pas imaginer une seule semaine sans écrire. Comme je ne peux imaginer ne pas lire plus de deux jours de suite. Et parce que je veux que mes textes existent pour d’autres, j’essaie que mes textes soient publiés. Et c’est un processus difficile, compétitif, et souvent décourageant.


C’est un peu comme les statistiques d’un blog. J’adore mes blogs, et parce que je suis active sur les réseaux sociaux, je suis sûre que certain·e·s s’imaginent que mes billets sont lus tous les jours par des centaines de gens. Alors là, hahaha ! Pas du tout, désolée. Mais ça n’est pas grave. Honnêtement, il faut vraiment qu’on arrête avec cette obsession et cette honte que l’on s’inflige concernant les statistiques de lecture : parfois mes blogs ne comptent pas même une seule visite pendant plusieurs jours. Parfois, j’atteins une unique visite sur toute la semaine. Pourtant, j’aime blogguer et continuerai à le faire. Bien sûre que j’aimerais être lue plus souvent, par plus de gens. Pourquoi est-ce qu’on ouvrirait un blogue, si ça n’était pas pour trouver un lectorat ? Mais je suis contente des choses telles qu’elles le sont aujourd’hui, et je veux rassurer les nombreux bloggueurs·euses et fans de réseaux sociaux que j’ai recontré·e·s : la vaste majorité des blogues ont un nombre de lecteurs·trices extrêmement restreint. Et ça ne veut pas dire qu’ils ne devraient pas exister.


Je tiens à dire tout ça car je lis souvent des entretiens où des écrivain·e·s déclarent : « c’est la première fois que je participe à un concours, alors vraiment je n’arrivais pas à y croire quand on m’a dit que j’avais gagné le premier prix, et qu’ensuite mon livre s’était écoulé à 300 000 exemplaires et avait été traduit en 28 langues. » Ces gens sont géniaux et je suis, du fond du cœur, ravie pour eux ! D’ailleurs, généralement je vais lire leurs écrits, parce que je me dis qu’ils sont forcément exceptionnels pour avoir été repérés comme ça, du premier coup. Mais en tout cas, ça n’est pas mon histoire. J’ai envoyé mes écrits à de nombreux concours, magazines, journaux, sans même faire partie de la pré-sélection. Je sais que je ne devrais pas dire ça. Car du coup, la première chose que vous allez vous dire, c’est : « oui, ben ça veut juste dire que tes textes n’étaient pas aussi bons que ça. » Je pense sincèrement que parfois oui, c’était le cas, et ça m’a poussée à retravailler un texte pour le rendre meilleur. Mais je pense que dans la majorité des cas, je n’ai pas été retenue pour tout un tas d’autres raisons : il y a tellement de candidatures, et d’excellentes candidatures, même quand on envoie son meilleur texte il est possible qu’il ne soit pas repéré parmi ces centaines de candidat·e·s. Et un autre juge vous aurait peut-être sélectionné·e, mais celui-là·celle-là, non. Tout ça pour dire que mon travail n’a pas été retenu des dizaines de fois. Et peut-être même des centaines, si je prends en compte tous les concours auxquels j’ai participé depuis mes 14 ans, toutes les maisons d’édition que j’ai contactées, tous les magazines auxquels j’ai envoyé mes poèmes. Je continue de travailler.

Alors quand j’annonce une bonne nouvelle sur les réseaux sociaux, ça veut dire que c’est là l’une de ces rares fois où j’ai reçu un courriel qui commençait par: “Félicitations”. Et j’explose de joie et de gratitude, vraiment. Ensuite, j’essaie de donner une existence réelle à chacun des textes qui atteint la publication. Parce qu’on sait tou·te·s qu’un texte n’est rien s’il n’est pas lu. Donc après avoir travaillé pour qu’un texte soit publié, je travaille pour qu’il trouve ses potentiel·le·s lecteurs·trices. Et comme je ne crois pas à l’autopromotion directe et opportuniste, ça prend énormément de temps, d’énergie et de patience. Mais ça ne fait rien. Ça fait partie du boulot, et c’est justement un boulot que j’aimerais tellement faire à plein temps.


Vous voyez, on est bien loin de l’histoire que les gens s’attendent généralement à ce que je raconte : « Oh, j’ai envoyé ça à une maison d’édition, qui a pensé que c’était la chose la plus extraordinaire qu’ils·elles avaient lu depuis Flaubert, donc ils·elles ont décidé de publier mon texte et de me donner un salaire à 5 chiffres. »

Et je n’ai même pas fini. Comme j’aime expérimenter et essayer des choses nouvelles, j’envoie énormément de courriels, de lettres, de colis (beaucoup d’endroits refusent encore les envois électroniques). La plupart du temps, ce que je reçois en retour, c’est une lettre-type de refus. « Nous sommes au regret de vous dire qu’après avoir lu avec attention… » et chaque fois, il me faut faire avec cette déception. Ça ne devient pas plus facile avec le temps. Chaque fois, je suis profondément déçue, parce qu’évidemment il ne me viendrait même pas à l’esprit de proposer quelque chose si je n’y croyais pas. Si je ne croyais pas que ce texte pouvait être lu, sélectionné, publié, je ne me permettrais pas de demander à quelqu’un d’y consacrer au moins un peu de son précieux temps. Finalement, la chose que j’ai faite le plus souvent, en tant qu’écrivaine, c’est apprendre à vivre avec la déception et les nombreux échecs. À notre époque, le mot « échec » n’est plus vraiment tendance. On veut lui donner un air positif, « oh, mais tu as dû apprendre de cette expérience ». Alors d’accord, j’ai appris, mais généralement l’apprentissage se limitait surtout à être une fois de plus déçue. Bien sûr que je continue quand même. Bien sûr. Mais à chaque fois, et désolée si je parais infantile ou arrogante, à chaque fois ça fait mal. On a beau savoir qu’il ne faudrait pas, d’un point de vue rationnel, prendre les choses personnellement, ça a tout l’air d’un mensonge bien déguisé dans ces moments où on se sent déprimé·e. Je ne le montre pas car évidemment on n’a pas le temps de le montrer, il faut se remettre à bosser son écriture.


J’ai surtout parlé d’écriture, ici, mais c’était pareil pour mes demandes d’emploi. J’ai un doctorat, ce qui est généralement quelque chose que les gens associent à une vie de réussite. Pourtant je n’ai pas été retenue plein de fois pour des emplois dont je me sentais vraiment capable, et dieu sait si je peux douter de moi. J’ai été invitée à des entretiens, en suis ressortie en pensant que pour une fois, ça s’était très bien passé, tout ça pour trouver le courriel de rejet de candidature attendant bien tranquille trois heures après dans ma boîte mail. Bordel, c’était dur. Bien plus que l’écriture, parce que bien sûr il s’agissait là de nécessités financières : je devais absolument trouver un emploi, ne serait-ce que pour payer le loyer. Et pourtant : “non”, “non”, “non”, “non”. Parfois “oui”. Mais la plupart du temps: “non”.


Alors je voulais m’en prendre à quelques mythes, ici.
1. La plupart des gens, même ceux qu’on considère comme ayant le plus de succès, n’ont pas de succès tout le temps. Évidemment que ces gens doivent gérer les refus. Probablement pas mal de refus, d’ailleurs. La seule chose, c’est qu’ils n’en parlent pas.
2. On ne peut pas toujours faire d’un échec quelque chose de positif. Et ça n’est pas grave, parce que ça n’est pas comme ça que ça marche. Parfois, ça casse juste vraiment les coui**es. Et les gens formidables qui vous entourent seront, j’en suis convaincue, absolument capables de vous entendre dire simplement ça, et n’insisteront pas pour que « vous voyiez les choses du bon côté ».
3. Mais pour réussir parfois, pour que votre travail et vos idées soient prises en compte, vous devez vous préparez au refus. Non pas dans le sens « oh, ça m’est égal, moi le ressentiment et l’amertume, ce sont des choses que je ne ressens jamais » (non mais ça existe, des gens comme ça ?!), mais dans le sens : « un jour, ça marchera, parce que je compte bien bosser jusqu’à ce que ça marche ».


Je ne crois pas à l’inspiration comme source majeure d’écriture, ni de réussite. Je crois au dévouement, à la concentration, à la ténacité. Désolée, ça ne fait pas aussi romantique. Je sais que j’ai encore plein d’échecs à venir. J’aimerais vraiment que ça ne soit pas le cas, mais je ne suis pas naïve. Je ne vais pas faire semblant que ça ne m’atteindra pas. Je sais qu’à chaque fois, ça fera mal. Mais je continuerai malgré tout, et je veux vous encourager à faire de même, parce que quelque chose me dit que nous représentons la majorité. Il n’y a rien de particulièrement rare là-dedans, alors continuez d’essayer.

Top

Towards, Perhaps, A Better Understanding of Happiness

french flag pastel

For Ange.


We encourage such a cartoonish depiction of happiness. Don’t get me wrong. I did too. Even though I had no idea what it was – I was too busy wondering how to get there to actually define it – it was absolutely clear that it would involve: a quasi-constant smile, calm, serenity, the total absence of worry or pain.

I have none of these things. Yet, I can now say it with more certitude than ever: fuck yeah, I am happy.

For one thing, I’ve met people who helped me understand that happiness doesn’t always have to include a 24/7 blissful smile. I must confess, in my family we like it to be part of the package. So I didn’t know how to react when I would ask my partner how he felt, and all he answered was: ‘I’m alright.’ You can be sure that straight away, I’d target him with numerous questions: ‘what do you mean just alright? Are you too cold? Too hot? Is the food not good? Oh dear have I done something? Have I upset you? It’s what I said in that shop two weeks ago, isn’t it?’ The look of absolute disbelief on his face: ‘No, I’m fine! I told you, I’m alright. I swear.’

We have SO many different ways to express feelings. It sounds like a freaking cliché, but it’s worth repeating, since we constantly pressure others into complying with our own codes. I’m quite passionate, and always rather extreme. Okay let’s rephrase: honestly, I’m a passionate freak. When I’m happy, I’m quite literally jumping, laughing non-stop, smiling to strangers and finding the very fact that I exist a miracle worth screaming about. I see people being kind to each other and I want to cry with gratefulness. Well, to some people, that’s just too much. Yes it is. I mean, honestly, it probably is. It’s not a sign of wellbeing or happiness. It’s a sign that I should probably cut down on the Prozac, or that I’m faking it completely. But I’m not faking it, and I’ve been like this long before starting any anti-depressants. Equally, you can feel exactly as ecstatic as I do and not show it at all. I’m not saying it’s innate. Some of it surely is due to genes and that, but most of it I believe is environmental and due to the very development of your personality. I have lived in a very openly expressive family. We have a hard time hiding how we feel. Some people have gone through totally different social experiences, and to them, feeling fine is their best definition ever of ‘the world is awesome, I’m so happy to live!’

My friend Ange put it brilliantly: ‘You can only be as happy as your character allows. Something’s not wrong with you because you don’t jump around frantically. A simple, humble smile might be your way.’

Of course if you want to change that way because it feels uncomfortable or difficult to use with other people, feel free to work on it. You don’t have to, though.

It’s a cliché to talk about happiness clichés. Talk about a Catch-22… Yet allow me to join the conversation once more and say it: to hell with all of that, let’s stop policing what it means, and should look like, to feel good. Yes, some of us may need adjusting a little, or a lot. Because at the end of the day, you still want to be able to communicate with the people that matter most. You still want to be understood and respected in all your dimensions. But honestly, outside that circle, who cares? Discuss with your partner, lover, friends and family to honestly describe how you feel and why it may not look like a cover of the magazine Marie-Claire, and if they care – and if you’re not being an asshole about it, I mean, come on – then of course they’ll be okay with how you act and what sort of words you use.

I come from a place where happiness lives on the skin, floats on the crest of words. Some people are as happy as me, and they don’t smile anywhere near half of the time. They don’t have a problem. Neither do I – on that front, I mean.

I don’t know how to define happiness, because once in my life I could have checked pretty much all boxes and still felt shitty as hell. I don’t know how to define happiness, but I know I’m living it right now. And let me tell you: I’m still prone to severe depressive episodes, still struggle with OCD on a daily basis, still bleed internally from grief knowing that some people I loved most will never make it back to earth, and that I will one day no longer be. My body is a permanent existential crisis locus, and yet I’m happy, I know I am, because I want to stay, I would beg anyone and anything to have more time and love to give, take, and steal.

I’m not calm, and I’ve tried mindfulness believe me, I’m not at all serene or “at peace”, my brain is a gigantic self-recreating mess and I feel anger, sadness, despair as much as I feel unfathomable gratefulness, joy and optimism, almost every day. Let’s forget about the box-ticking and the simplifying body-language stereotypes.

Learn to express your own happiness (and equally, sadness) so that people who care can get you, and you can get them. Once upon a time I strongly believed that any silence betrayed discomfort, pain or being bored. I exhausted myself filling in all the gaps when other people were around me. Since I have allowed silence to be part of my communication style, as I’ve wanted it to be all along, I’ve never felt so able to connect with others.

Let’s care about how people feel instead of policing their behaviours, moves and facial expressions. And let’s give us all a break: it’s also okay, not to feel happy. Honestly, you don’t have to in order to have a life worth living. You may never feel as happy as you think you should or could have. It doesn’t even mean you weren’t.


As the great Whitney Houston once sung it: “I wish you joy and happiness, but above all this I wish you: love”. Whitney, if you hear us: thank you.


C’est quoi être heureux ? Tentative d’indéfinition

À Ange

On soutient une définition tellement caricaturale de ce sentiment: être heureux. Comprenez-moi, bien, je l’ai soutenue moi-même. Bien que je n’avais aucune idée de ce que cela voulait dire (j’étais bien trop occupée à savoir comment y parvenir pour m’interroger sur ce que c’était vraiment), il était clair que cela impliquait : un sourire quasi-constant, du calme, de la sérénité, l’absence totale d’inquiétude ou de douleur.

Je n’ai rien de tout ça. Pourtant, je peux dire avec plus de certitude que je n’en ai jamais eue : bordel oui, je suis heureuse.

D’abord car j’ai rencontré des gens qui m’ont permis de comprendre qu’être heureuse, ça n’incluait pas forcément un sourire béat H-24. Je l’avoue, dans ma famille on aime que le sourire fasse partie du lot. Alors je ne savais pas comment réagir quand je demandais à mon copain comment il allait, et qu’il me répondait : « ça va. » Vous pouvez être sûr que tout de suite après, j’enchaînais les questions du style : « juste ‘ça va’ ? T’as froid ? T’as chaud ? La bouffe est pas bonne? Oh bon dieu j’ai fait quelque chose? Je t’ai vexé? C’est ce que j’ai dit dans ce magasin il y a deux semaines, c’est ça? » Son air d’incompréhension absolue: “Non non, ça va! Je te dis, ça va bien. Je te promets.”

On a des manières tellement différentes d’exprimer ce qu’on ressent. C’est vraiment un poncif, mais il faut le répéter, puisqu’on fout la pression à tout le monde pour qu’ils se soumettent à nos propres codes. Je suis plutôt passionnée, et généralement assez extrême. Bon d’accord je reformule : honnêtement, je suis une cinglée de l’enthousiasme. Quand je suis heureuse, je saute quasi littéralement de partout, je rigole sans arrêt, je souris aux inconnus et je trouve que le simple fait que je vive est un miracle suffisant pour le gueuler. Je vois des gens être gentils entre eux et j’ai envie d’en pleurer de gratitude. Bon, pour certains, ça fait un peu beaucoup. Oui, c’est beaucoup. Je veux dire, sincèrement, c’est sûrement trop. Ce n’est pas un signe d’équilibre ou de bonheur. C’est un signe que je devrais probablement diminuer ma dose de Prozac, ou que je simule complet. Pourtant, je ne simule pas, et j’étais comme ça bien avant de prendre des anti-dépresseurs. De même, il est possible que vous vous sentiez aussi extatique que moi et ne le montriez pas du tout. Je ne dis pas que c’est inné. C’est sûrement en partie lié aux gènes et tout ça, mais je pense que l’essentiel vient de notre environnement et du développement de notre personnalité. J’ai vécu dans une famille très ouvertement expressive. On a du mal à cacher ce qu’on ressent. Certains ont vécu des expériences sociales totalement différentes, et pour eux, s’en tenir à se sentir pas trop mal est la meilleure définition qu’ils ont de: “la vie est formidable, je suis trop heureux d’être là ! »

Une amie, Ange, l’a brillamment formulé : « on ne peut qu’être aussi heureux que le permet notre caractère. Ce n’est pas parce qu’on ne saute pas constamment au plafond qu’on a un problème. Un sourire simple, discret, peut être notre façon de l’exprimer. »

Bien sûr, si vous désirez changer ça parce que ça vous met mal à l’aise, ou que ça rend les relations aux autres difficiles, vous pouvez travailler dessus. Mais ce n’est pas une obligation.

C’est un cliché de parler des clichés du bonheur. Tu parles d’un cercle vicieux… Pourtant, permettez-moi de rejoindre la conversation et de le dire : on s’en fout de tout ça, arrêtons de vouloir surveiller ce que ça veut dire, ce à quoi ça doit ressembler, de se sentir bien. Certes, une partie d’entre nous peut avoir besoin de s’adapter quelque peu, ou beaucoup. Parce qu’au bout du bout, ce qui compte c’est d’être en mesure de communiquer avec les gens qui comptent le plus pour nous. On veut être compris et respectés dans toutes nos dimensions. Mais honnêtement, sortis de ce cercle-là, qu’est-ce qu’on en a à secouer ? Parlez avec votre partenaire, votre amant, vos amis, votre famille, et dites-leur honnêtement comment vous vous sentez et pourquoi ça ne ressemble pas à une couverture de Marie-Claire, et s’ils vous aiment (et que vous ne vous comportez pas comme un enfoiré, n’abusons pas), alors bien sûr que votre manière de vous comporter et de parler leur conviendra.

Je viens d’un endroit où le bonheur se vit sur la peau, flotte sur la crête des mots. Certains sont aussi heureux que moi, et pourtant ne sourient pas la moitié de ce temps-là. Ce n’est pas qu’ils ont un souci. Et moi non plus. Enfin, là-dessus, je veux dire…

Je ne sais pas définir le bonheur, parce qu’il m’est arrivé dans ma vie de pouvoir cocher quasi toutes les cases qu’on pense nécessaires, et je me sentais au trente-sixième dessous quand même. Je ne sais pas définir « être heureuse », mais ce que je sais c’est que je le vis actuellement. Et laissez-moi vous dire ça : je suis toujours sujette à de sévères épisodes dépressifs, je me bats avec mes TOC quotidiennement, je saigne de l’intérieur du chagrin de savoir que des gens que j’aimais le plus au monde ne pourront jamais retrouver leur chemin jusqu’à nous, et qu’un jour moi non plus je ne serai plus. Mon corps est un lieu de crise existentielle permanente, et pourtant je suis heureuse, je sais que je le suis, parce que je veux y rester, je supplierai n’importe qui, n’importe quoi, de me laisser encore du temps et de l’amour à donner, à prendre, à voler.

Je ne suis pas calme, et j’ai essayé la mindfulness, je ne suis ni sereine ni « en paix avec moi-même », mon cerveau est un incessant bazar géant, et je ressens de la colère, de la tristesse, du désespoir, autant que je ressens une reconnaissance indescriptible, de la joie et de l’optimisme, tout ça quasiment tous les jours. Oublions les soi-disants critères et autres expressions corporelles stéréotypées.

Apprenez à exprimer votre propre bonheur (et aussi votre tristesse) pour que les gens autour de vous vous comprennent, et que vous les compreniez en retour. Il fut un temps où je pensais dur comme fer que tout silence trahissait de l’embarras, de la douleur ou de l’ennui. Je me suis épuisée à remplir tous ces trous quand j’avais des gens autour de moi. Depuis que j’ai permis au silence de faire partie de mon mode d’expression, comme je l’ai toujours souhaité, je ne me suis jamais sentie si reliée aux autres.

Préoccupons-nous davantage de comment les gens se sentent plutôt que de comment ils se comportent, bougent ou changent leurs expressions du visage. Et aussi, offrons-nous une pause : ca n’est pas forcément grave, ne pas être se sentir heureux. Honnêtement, on n’a pas besoin de ça pour avoir une vie qui vaut d’être vécue. Car peut-être qu’on ne se sentira jamais aussi heureux qu’on le « devrait » ou qu’on le voudrait. Ça ne veut même pas forcément dire qu’on ne l’est pas.
Comme la grande Whitney Houston l’a chanté: “Je te souhaite joie et bonheur, mais surtout, je te souhaite l’amour.” (“I wish you joy and happiness, but above all this I wish you: love”) Whitney, si tu nous entends : merci.

Top

Long-lived Deads

french flag pastel

I know my dad is dead. I’m in no denial. I know he passed away, thank you very much. So why is it that every day still, every freaking day, I experience that sort of moment – only two seconds, even less I guess – when it feels like I forgot, like I need to learn again that he is gone?

Most of the times, it’s in the morning. I thought that the feeling would pass. I thought: ‘it’s because it’s just too recent. Your subconscious, still clouded by your sleep, doesn’t realise what is and what isn’t’ – for god’s sake, sometimes I have to actually wonder whether I did in fact have a coffee with Beyoncé at my place yesterday… If that doesn’t tell you how vivid my dreams are… (once fully awake I realise I don’t like coffee, so I know I’ve been dreaming.) So anyway, I thought it would pass, just as the ‘I’m-friend-with-Beyoncé’ feeling will pass after I’m 12.

Except it didn’t pass. Like the fact that I keep dreaming I have coffee with famous people, even though I know none of them, and I don’t like coffee.

I think I’ve accepted it, when my father passed away. Not that I was happy or relieved in any way – of course not. But it was so absurd that it happened quickly. It was so unbelievable that it got real. And now, his absence is so real I can’t believe it.

When something nice happens, and I think, for a split second: ‘I can’t wait to tell D..’ and it’s like swallowing petrol. When something terrible occurs, and I think: ‘thank God dad will understand how I feel’… Or when nothing happens, nothing, and just like that, I think: ‘I’ll call him later today’. And another cruel voice screams: ‘NO YOU WON’T! NO YOU WON’T!’

How did I ever believe that death was about a date? How did I think it was all about that one day – yeah, okay, maybe a week…? I think I’ve paid far too much attention to the dates which seal the graves. So and so, 1912-1958. Another one, 1945-2011. And that little one there, 1952-1952. There were too many dates, I panicked, I focused on numbers while they were growing inside of me.

I thought it was about that one day. That one terrible day they always show in movies, because it’s dramatic, because it creates empathy, because what we fear – what I feared the most was that one minute. It would be like jumping from a bridge. They don’t tell you the ground will never feel the same again. Or maybe they did. And I didn’t want to listen. That day, I was probably too busy having coffee with my dad. And Beyoncé. Even though I don’t like coffee.

But my dad knew it, and he never had a cup of coffee without asking me: ‘mint tea for you?’


La longévité des morts


Je sais que mon père est mort. Je ne suis pas dans le déni. Je sais qu’il est décédé, merci beaucoup. Alors pourquoi est-ce que chaque jour, encore aujourd’hui, chaque putain de jour, je ressens ce truc à un moment (deux secondes, sûrement moins), c’est comme si j’avais oublié qu’il n’était plus là, et que je doive l’apprendre à nouveau.

La plupart du temps, ça arrive le matin. Je me disais que ça passerait. Je me disais : « c’est parce que c’est encore trop récent. Ton subconscient, encore embrumé de sommeil, ne se rend pas encore compte de ce qui est réel, et de ce qui ne l’est pas ». Bordel, des fois je dois même me demander sérieusement si j’ai vraiment pris un café avec Beyoncé chez moi la veille… Si après ça, vous ne comprenez pas que mes rêves font trop réalistes… (mais ensuite toujours je me rends compte que je n’aime pas le café, donc je comprends que je rêvais) Bref. Je pensais que ça passerait, tout comme la sensation « je-suis-copine-avec-Beyoncé ».

Sauf que ça n’est pas passé. Tout comme le fait que je persiste à rêver que je prends le café avec des gens célèbres, même si je n’en connais aucun, et que je n’aime pas le café.

Je crois que je l’avais accepté, le jour où mon père est décédé. Non pas que je m’en réjouissais, ou même que ça me soulageait – bien sûr que non. Mais c’était tellement absurde que c’est passé vite. C’était tellement inimaginable que ça a été réel. Et maintenant, l’absence est si réelle que je n’arrive pas à l’imaginer.

Quand quelque chose de chouette m’arrive, et que je pense, pendant une fraction de seconde : « j’ai hâte de le dire à p… » Et d’un coup c’est comme avaler de l’essence. Quand quelque chose d’horrible arrive, et que je me dis : « heureusement, papa comprendra ce que je ressens… » Ou alors quand rien ne se passe, et que juste comme ça, je me dis : « tiens, je l’appellerai plus tard », et qu’une autre voix hurle, cruelle : « HÉ BEN NAN ! HÉ BEN NAN ! »

Comment ai-je pu croire que la mort concernait une date ? Comment ai-je pu penser que tout tournerait autour de cette date (okay, de cette semaine-là alors). J’ai dû porter bien trop d’attention aux dates scellant les tombes. Là, 1912-1958. Ici, 1945-2011. Et cette petite, là, 1952-1952. Il y avait trop de dates, j’ai paniqué, je me suis concentrée sur les chiffres pendant qu’ils grandissaient en moi.

J’ai cru qu’il s’agirait de ce jour-là. Ce jour qu’on montre dans les films pour le côté grand dramaturge, parce qu’il crée de l’empathie, parce que ce dont on a peur – ce dont moi, j’avais peur, c’était de cette minute-là, que ça soit comme de sauter d’un pont. On ne nous dit pas qu’en fait, le sol n’aura plus jamais la même consistance après. Ou peut-être qu’on me l’a dit. Ce jour-là, je devais être trop occupée à prendre un café avec mon père. Et avec Beyoncé. Même si moi, le café, j’aime pas ça.

Mais mon père le savait, et il ne se servait jamais une tasse de café sans me demander : “je te fais un thé à la menthe ?”

Top

Contradictions? People Living with OCD Don’t All Live in Pristine Homes

french flag pastel

When the term OCD is used metaphorically, generally in a light-hearted conversation, it usually – if not always – refers to someone obsessed with cleanliness, patterns, symmetry, perfect organising skills. ‘Oh, yeah, he has such a tidy desk – he’s a bit OCD, really’, ‘Cleaned the whole house today: OCD power!’, ‘so my sister will never let me wear her trousers for fear that I damage them – I mean, she’s a bit OCD with her stuff’…

I don’t particularly mind. I know some people living with OCD would get really upset – and they have the right to be, as they believe this will trivialise their mental illness. I can totally understand someone making that point. However, I’m not upset. I’m aware that using OCD so loosely limits its representation, and gives a partial – if not sometimes downright false – view of what OCD feels and looks like. At the very least, nonetheless, I’m happy that the term is getting more widely known. When I tell people that I have OCD, they may have a limited idea of what it is, but they know I’m referring to obsessions and compulsions… and that’s a good start to get the conversation going, should they want to.


So what I want to highlight here is not the fact that OCD is much more than just that, but the fact that these limited representations make us believe in a consistent, uniform OCD mind. People living with OCD are – just as everyone else – made of contradictions, or at the very least made of what seems to be contradictions to the external observer. Yet, as we shall see, these are not contradictions. There are the very thing OCD creates – namely, a fucked-up mind.

I’ll be concise: you can have OCD, be obsessed with order and cleaning some things – and yet live in a disgusting place. Not because you want to, not because in fact deep down you looove dust and stains, but because it’s your very obsession for order and cleanliness that prevents you from cleaning stuff.

Let us take an example here. Someone who is obsessed about sleeping in a clean bed, for instance, can spend hours – or even days, doing the laundry, washing the same pair of sheets over and over again, put them on the bed, only to start all over again because the result didn’t seem satisfactory: that person spotted a tiny stain, or some dust coming from a piece of furniture nearby or the open window. Anything like that. They will therefore start the whole process again: cleaning, making sure it’s clean, putting them into place. Now all the time they’re dedicating to ensuring their bed is clean is time they can’t put anywhere else. The rest of the bedroom might be a mess. They may have loads of laundry piling up as they only focus on the duvet cover, pillowcases and sheets every day. They may put crumbles everywhere in the kitchen as they no longer have time to eat, so they just eat a poorly-prepared sandwich standing over the kitchen table, and go back to the : cleaning-the-bed priority task… Seems like a contradiction? It is not. It is precisely because they are so obsessed with a few (or many) things that the rest has to wait…

I learned through David Adam’s book The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD, and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought (see the section ‘Liberating Works’ of this blog for the full reference) that maybe this was due to a confusion between OCPD (Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder) and OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder). This is what he writes: ‘Visit the home of someone with OCPD [obsessive-compulsive personality disorder] and not a chair or rug will be out of place. Yet people with OCD whose compulsions demand that they clean often restrict the practice to a specific room. OCD patients can have spotless toilets that sparkle with bleach next to a filthy kitchen caked with months-old food. An OCD washer who cleans his hands 200-odd times a day can wear the same underwear for weeks.’ (pp. 64-65)

The reason for this is simple: time and focus. You can’t focus (to the point of obsession) on everything at the same time, but you sure can get really obsessed about certain specific things.
I also believe there might be conflicting internal values at stake. For instance, I would like the kitchen to be clutter-less. My partner knows that one of my dreams is to see nothing – that’s right, nothing – on the kitchen worktops. Because the less I see, the more I control the stimuli. Yet on the other hand, some things are incredibly hard to remove, so I can very easily get messy – and you might find this completely contradictory. I’ll show you something that’s been on the kitchen worktop for over two weeks now, because I can’t remove it: it’s a broken glass.

broken glass

That’s right, nothing fancy, it’s just a broken glass. It’s a clean broken glass, by the way – nevertheless, I can’t bring myself to throw it away. Just thinking about it makes me feel dizzy, I need to sit down: because if I put in the recycling, someone will get hurt. If they get hurt, it would be my fault. So I need to wrap it in several layers of bubble wraps before I put it away – but then it can’t go into the recycling box, it needs to go in the general waste bin. But then, I picture that guy pushing the waste bag into the truck with full strength, as he feels that it’s actually quite soft, and glass shouldn’t be in non-recyclable waste anyway, and then suddenly he pushes too much, and cuts himself; now he’s going to think that I intentionally wrapped something extremely dangerous in bubble wrap to trick him – and then it’s not only careless, it’s cruel! This story, with hundreds of alternatives, goes like that in my mind forever. Which is why I get exhausted after 5 minutes looking at the glass, and I leave it there.

Don’t get me wrong: I know it’s not going to go away magically. At some point in my life, even though I’m not a severe hoarder (well I don’t think I am anyway), I had more than 25 empty glass bottles and jars that I collected over months, and I put them into a cupboard, because I couldn’t bring myself to take that risk I mentioned. What made it even worse is that in England, at least where I live, you put all your recycling out the day before collection, in specific boxes and bags. And I couldn’t stop thinking: a cat’s going to kill itself on the bottle. A kid will play with an empty jar and bleed to death. A drunken lad is going to fall on the bags and break all bottles, and will get severely injured… So what I did was: take the recycling out as rarely as possible, and wait until very very late at night to make the number of potential walkers-by as small as possible. So yeah, I often stayed awake until very late to take out the recycling: 4am, 5am, 6am. The collection could happen anytime from 7am.

The movie Aviator [spoiler alert, please skip this paragraph if you don’t want to know what happens] showed another common ‘contradiction’ (at this point, I’m sure you understand that I put speech quotes because these are not contradictions): how someone obsessed by the possibility of contamination and bacteria can end up living for months or years with everything their body produces… To avoid the contamination from the external world, they choose to never leave the one room they’ve chosen at their protected space. It may seem irrational, but isn’t it logical? If you don’t go out, you won’t catch anything other people have.

This isn’t to say that OCD sufferers don’t fight these ‘contradictions’. But it’s damn hard, and some of us feel extremely ashamed about them… Especially since, to be good OCD patients, we’re expected to be consistent. Maybe more so than with other mental illness: we have to be extra-clean, extra-organised, extra-careful… If you still think we should, just look for the clinical meaning of ‘hoarding’.

We’re expected to be consistent, as I was saying. Although when I think about it, I remember hearing a similar thing about people going through depression, as I once did: you couldn’t be that bad if you were still able, from time to time, to seem normal (that is: smiling, attending a social gathering, etc.) Yet people living through depression, and not wanting to show it, can spend literally days preparing to hold a fake smile for a three-hour party. And maybe, at that party, you truly won’t know they’ve been a mess for days. It doesn’t make them any less depressed, though.

Although it’s good, and incredibly helpful, to know what the common symptoms are, we probably should all start with this simple question: so, what does this do to you?
Have a good night, folks, and rest assured that you’re not the only one living with internal contradictions.


Contradictions? Les gens qui vivent avec des TOC ne vivent pas tous dans des maisons ultra propres, ultra rangées

[Note aux lecteurs francophones : cet article a beaucoup plus de poids dans le domaine anglophone, où l’acronyme OCD (= TOC) fait maintenant partie du langage courant. Il est en particulier très présent sur internet. Bien qu’il me semble que les francophones l’utilisent moins (mais ça fait un moment que je ne vis plus en territoire francophone, donc je ne sais pas vraiment à quel point j’ai tort de penser qu’il y ait une différence), j’ai néanmoins voulu vous le traduire, car on a quand même une vague idée de ce que sont les TOC quand on entend ce mot, en général.]

Lorsqu’on emploie le terme de TOC de manière métaphorique, en général au détour d’une conversation légère, il renvoie généralement (voire tout le temps) à quelqu’un d’obsédé par la propreté, la symétrie, une organisation parfaite. « Ouais, son bureau est tellement bien rangé, on croirait qu’il a des TOC », « j’ai rangé tout la maison aujourd’hui : super-TOC, c’est moi ! », « alors ma sœur ne veut jamais me prêter ses pantalons, parce qu’elle a peur que je les abîme… Elle est un peu TOC-TOC avec ses affaires »…

Ça ne me gêne pas plus que ça. Je sais que certaines personnes vivant avec des TOC elles-mêmes trouvent cette utilisation dérangeante, car elles craignent que cela ridiculise leur trouble psychologique. Je comprends parfaitement qu’on puisse défendre ça. Cela dit, personnellement cet emploi ne me dérange pas. J’ai bien conscience que le fait d’employer ce terme de manière si légère limite les formes de sa représentation, et donne une vision parcellaire (voire parfois complètement erronée) de ce que les TOC nous font faire et ressentir. Néanmoins, je suis heureuse que ce terme-là gagne en notoriété. Quand je dis aux gens que j’ai des TOC, ils ont peut-être une vision limitée de ce que cela représente, mais au moins ils savent que cela a un lien avec des obsessions et des compulsions… ce qui est déjà une très bonne manière de lancer le dialogue, qu’on poursuit avec plaisir s’ils le souhaitent.

Ce que je veux souligner ici, ce n’est donc pas que les TOC sont bien plus que ça, mais le fait que ces représentations limitées font croire à un esprit cohérent, uniforme chez les personnes atteintes de TOC. Les gens vivant avec des TOC sont, comme tout le monde d’ailleurs, faits de contradictions, ou en tout cas de ce qui peut apparaître comme une contradiction pour un observateur extérieur. Pourtant, comme on est sur le point d’en discuter, ce ne sont pas là des contradictions. Ce sont les conséquences de ce que produisent les TOC, c’est-à-dire un esprit qui part en couille.


Je serai brève : on peut avoir des TOC, être obsédé par le ménage, et pourtant vivre dans un endroit dégueulasse. Pas parce qu’on le souhaite, ni parce qu’au fond, on adooore la poussière et les taches, mais parce qu’une obsession pour le nettoyage peut justement empêcher quelqu’un de nettoyer.

Prenons un exemple ici. Quelqu’un qui est obsédé par l’idée de dormir dans un lit propre, par exemple, peut passer des heures, des jours même, à faire des lessives, à nettoyer la même paire de draps encore et encore, à les mettre sur le lit, pour finir par tout recommencer car le résultat ne semblait pas satisfaisant : ce quelqu’un a remarqué une petite tache, de la poussière venant d’un meuble tout proche ou de la fenêtre entrouverte, quelque chose comme ça. Il recommencera donc tout le processus à nouveau : nettoyer, s’assurer que c’est propre, mettre les draps en place. Mais tout le temps qu’il consacre à s’assurer que le lit est propre, c’est du temps qu’il ne peut pas passer ailleurs. Le reste de la chambre peut être un bordel monstrueux. Le linge sale peut s’accumuler en piles gigantesques, puisque cette personne ne se consacre qu’à sa housse de couette, ses taies d’oreiller et ses draps tous les jours. Peut-être que cette personne met aussi des miettes partout dans la cuisine car elle n’a plus le temps de manger, et avale donc sur un coin de table un sandwich préparé à l’arrache pour mieux retourner à la tache prioritaire du lit propre… Ça semble contradictoire ? Ça ne l’est pas. C’est précisément parce qu’on est obsédés par quelques (ou beaucoup de) trucs que le reste ne peut qu’attendre…

J’ai appris en lisant le livre de David Adam The Man Who Couldn’t Stop: OCD, and the True Story of a Life Lost in Thought (voir la section “Liberating Works” de ce blog pour la référence complète) que cela était peut-être dû à la confusion entre Personnalité Obsessionnelle Compulsive et Troubles Obsessionnels Compulsifs [si vous connaissez une traduction française mettant davantage en lumière la différence entre les deux, je suis preneuse]. Voici ce que David Adam note à ce propos : « rendez-vous chez quelqu’un montrant une Personnalité Obsessionnelle Compulsive, et pas une chaise ni un tapis ne sera de travers. Mais les gens présentant des Troubles Obsessionnels Compulsifs qui leur demandent de nettoyer constamment limitent souvent cette pratique obsessionnelle à une seule pièce. Les patients ayant des TOC peuvent avoir des toilettes impeccables, étincelants de passage répétés à la javel, juste à côté d’une cuisine dégueulasse tachetée de bouts de nourritures datant d’il y a plusieurs mois. Un patient ayant des TOC de propreté et se lavant les mains 200 fois par jour peut porter le même slip pendant des semaines. » (traduction des pages 64-65)

La raison en est simple: temps et concentration. Il est impossible de se concentrer (jusqu’àu point de l’obsession) sur tout à la fois, mais on peut se focaliser jusqu’à l’obsession sur quelques éléments spécifiques.

Je crois aussi que des valeurs peuvent entrer en conflit en nous. Par exemple, je voudrais que la cuisine soit parfaitement rangée, sans rien qui traîne. Mon partenaire sait que mon rêve, entre autres, est de ne voir absolument rien (oui, c’est ça, absolument rien) sur les plans de travail. Parce que moins j’en vois, mieux je parviens à contrôler ce qui m’affecte. Mais d’un autre côté, certaines choses sont incroyablement difficiles à enlever pour moi, donc je peux très facilement accumuler un bazar remarquable. Vous trouvez sûrement cela tout à fait contradictoire. Je vais vous montrer quelque chose qui se trouve sur le plan de travail depuis bien deux semaines maintenant, parce que je n’arrive pas à l’enlever : un verre cassé.

broken glass

Oui c’est bien ça, ça n’a rien d’extraordinaire en soi, c’est juste un verre cassé. C’est un verre cassé propre, soit dit en passant ; néanmoins, je n’arrive toujours pas à le jeter. Rien que d’y penser me donne comme des vertiges, j’ai besoin de m’asseoir : parce que si je le mets au recyclage, quelqu’un va se blesser. Si quelqu’un se blesse, ce sera ma faute. Je dois donc emballer le verre dans plusieurs couches de papier bulle avant de le jeter, mais donc je ne peux plus le mettre au recyclage, car il est emballé, donc je dois le mettre dans la poubelle normale. Mais alors là, ce qui me vient c’est l’image du gars qui pousse le sac poubelle dans son camion, de toute sa force, puisqu’il sent que le sac est souple et que du verre ne devrait pas s’y trouver de toute façon. Et voilà que tout-à-coup il pousse trop fort et il se coupe. Maintenant il va croire que j’avais fait exprès d’emballer du verre tranchant dans du papier bulle comme pour lui tendre un piège, et alors là ça n’est même plus de la négligence, c’est de la cruauté ! Cette histoire, avec ses centaines d’alternatives, tourne comme ça en boucle sans s’arrêter. C’est pourquoi après 5 minutes à y penser je suis déjà épuisée par ce bout de verre, et je laisse là où il est.

Comprenons-nous bien: je sais qu’il ne va pas s’enlever tout seul comme par magie. À un certain moment de ma vie, même si je ne souffre pas sévèrement du TOC de l’accumulation (en tout cas je pense être un cas vraiment très léger), j’avais chez moi 25 bouteilles et bocaux en verre vides que j’avais accumulés au cours des mois ; je les mettais dans un placard, car je n’arrivais pas à prendre le risque que j’ai mentionné plus haut. Ce qui rendait la chose pire encore, c’est qu’en Angleterre, en tout cas où j’habite, on met tout son recyclage dehors la veille du ramassage des poubelles, dans des caisses et des sac prévus à cet effet. Et je n’arrivais pas à penser à autre chose qu’à un chat qui allait se tuer sur une bouteille. Ou à un enfant qui jouerait avec un bocal vide et qui saignerait jusqu’à ce que mort s’ensuive. Ou à un mec bourré qui tomberait sur les sacs et qui, en cassant ainsi toutes les bouteilles, se blesserait grièvement… Alors ce que je faisais, c’était simple : je sortais le recyclage le plus rarement possible, attendant une heure avancée de la nuit pour diminuer au maximum le nombre potentiel de passants. Oui, je restais souvent éveillée très tard dans la nuit pour sortir le recyclage : 4h du mat’, 5h, 6h. Le ramassage pouvait avoir lieu à n’importe quelle heure à partir de 7h.

Le film Aviator [attention je balance la fin, ne lisez pas ce paragraphe si vous ne voulez pas savoir ce qui s’y passe] montre une autre ‘contradiction’ répandue (au point du texte où vous en êtes, je suis sûre que vous comprenez que je mets là des guillemets car ce n’est pas réellement une contradiction) : selon quelle logique quelqu’un d’obsédé par la peur de la contamination et des bactéries peut finir par vivre pendant des mois ou des années avec tout ce que son corps produit… Pour éviter la contamination venant du monde extérieur, des gens choisissent de ne jamais quitter la pièce qu’ils ont élu comme étant leur espace protecteur. Cela peut paraître irrationnel, mais est-ce que ça n’est pas logique ? Si on ne sort pas, on ne risque pas d’attraper ce qu’attrapent les autres au dehors.

Tout cela ne revient pas à dire que les personnes souffrant de TOC ne luttent pas contre ces « contradictions ». Mais c’est vraiment dur, et certains d’entre nous nous sentons particulièrement honteux de présenter ces contradictions au monde extérieur. Surtout en raison du fait que pour être de bons patients atteints de TOC, on attend de nous qu’on soit très cohérents. Peut-être encore plus cohérents qu’avec n’importe quel autre trouble psychologique : on doit être ultra propre, ultra organisé, ultra précautionneux, etc. Et si vous pensez toujours qu’en effet, on le devrait, cherchez simplement ce qu’est la définition de l’ « accumulation » et de la peur de jeter relative aux TOC.

Comme je le disais, on attend de nous que l’on soit cohérents. Mais en fait, quand j’y réfléchis, je me souviens avoir entendu la même chose à propos de gens atteints de dépression : si de temps en temps on arrive à avoir l’air normal (en souriant, en se rendant chez des gens pour une soirée, etc), c’est bien qu’en fait on ne va pas si mal qu’on le dit… Pourtant, là encore, nulle contradiction. Les gens traversent une dépression, et ne voulant pas le montrer, ils peuvent passer des jours à se préparer un faux sourire pour une soirée de trois heures. Et peut-être qu’en effet, à cette soirée, on pourrait ne pas voir l’état de détresse dans lequel ils ont été les jours précédents. Mais ça ne fait pas d’eux des gens moins dépressifs.

Bien que ce soit formidable de connaître les symptômes les plus répandus, et bien que cela puisse aider quelqu’un considérablement, on devrait peut-être tout simplement commencer par cette question : et toi, en fait, ça te fait quoi, à toi ?
Bonne nuit à tous, et rassurez-vous : vous n’êtes pas les seuls à vivre emplis de contradictions.

Top

Needing Others: This Strength I Considered a Weakness

french flag pastel

My friends can testify. And really they should, or at least they should talk to someone about it, because they must be quite traumatized by all the shit I kept saying for years about love.

I thought needing someone was the worst thing that could happen to you. Or, more accurately: I thought that acknowledging you needed someone was the worst thing that could happen to you. Because of course, as long as you pretend otherwise, nobody knows and you can cry all doors closed.

The most pathetic moments in my existence have happened when I wanted so much to avoid being pathetic – that is: what I thought would be seen as pathetic.

See, I’m a woman. And I had read everywhere, all the time, that no one liked the sobbing girl in love. Everywhere I turned, sobbing girl in love was the stupid one. Who likes the snif-snif-I-miss-you mess, in movies? We all roll our eyes, and go pffff…

I thought love was dumb, anyway. And awful. And the source of much suffering. And godammit – so freaking necessary.
I found the very idea of a ‘couple’ to be restrictive, submissive, poisonous. I feared it so much I wrote a whole damn PhD thesis on the topic. If that doesn’t tell you how fucked up I was – in a very academic way, though – I don’t know what will.

This constant suspicion led me to believe that in order to be an independent individual – which I still want to be, even though many things have changed – I had to never seek help from others. From family and friends, sure. But above all: from boyfriends. Picture this: what sort of independent woman could I be, if during a tough evening, I called a guy – I mean a guy, for god’s sake! – to come help me… Wouldn’t that be re-enacting the princess trope? ‘I need you to rescue me because I’m so fragile’, sort of trope?

Thus I hardly ever called.

This, obviously, pissed me off. Because I was waiting for my boyfriend to call me, hoping he would need to hear me at the exact moment I needed to hear him. Hoping he would miss me right when I missed him the most, hoping he would express this I-miss-you the way I imagined it.

One evening, we were at his place, I think somehow we got talking about coming to each other’s places. I must have said something about sometimes wanting to see him and not calling him, because he said: ‘Yeah. I know. I’ve noticed you don’t call. Why is that?
– Well, I don’t know (yeah, right!)… I wouldn’t want you to think I really needed to see you.
– You don’t want to see me?
– Oh yes I want to, but I mean… I don’t want to act like I’m desperate and I really need to.
– Okay… And say one day you’re desperate and need to see me. Will you call?
– Errr… Honestly, I don’t think so.
– Why?
– Because I would have to say it.
– Say what?
– That I would want to see you very very much…
– Would that be true?
– Well, yeah… But then it means I’m so dependent, so needy, that’s bullshit!
– Hmmmm… so let me get this straight: what’s not bullshit is you not asking me when you want to see me.
– Yeah…
– … so, in fact, the ideal solution is that we only meet when I say I want to…
– …
– Which is basically what we’re doing right now, since you don’t say when you want to see me.
– …
– … soooo, to be an independent woman, you’re letting me choose every time when and where we meet.

Oooooops… Didn’t see that one coming.

We had a very long talk. When I had to tell him I didn’t want to be a burden, I didn’t want to be the one holding him back – and man, I didn’t want to be that girlfriend who’s so needy.

I had to learn that being independent certainly doesn’t mean avoiding expressing how you feel. Actually, strong independent people can voice their concerns and opinions. On so many other levels, I was able to do so: I could speak to a whole audience about politics and burning issues… And I wasn’t able to say to my partner: ‘I feel a bit shit tonight… Could we like, meet and do nothing?’



When things got worse for me regarding my mental health, it was no longer just a feminist issue… I had to face the truth: your support network is crucial from a health perspective too. Feeling supported when you can’t imagine that you’ll ever be better is one of the things that keeps you going. So when you have the incredible luck to have people you love, and who love you, when you’ve worked so hard on developing meaningful and caring relationships, it is not a weakness to benefit from them. Actually, not relying on them would be self-sabotage, since you contributed to make them that deep. They impact you so much, why not taking the nice side of the impact too?

I’m talking about my partner because that’s my experience. But this can be transferred to any other significant relationships: lovers, other halves, friends, family, colleagues…



Accepting love – accepting that we need people – is accepting to get helped. Far from a weakness, it’s a strength that can save you. Not because of the stupid and stereotypical prince-and-princess (or prince/prince, princess/princess, and any other combination) trope: I’ve seen machos being saved by their girlfriends too, you see. We save each other. That’s what we do. Not save from dragons, not even from death – it’s not always that dramatic. But we save each other from pessimism, from the circle of dark thoughts. I could pretend all I want that I was a pessimistic, with my constant cynicism and whatnot. Yet the very fact that I loved, and wanted to love even more – proved that I believed in the power of love (but hey, doesn’t that sound dumb???), even if that power was merely to say fuck off to the rest of the world, and to believe, just for a second, that someone wanted to be with me. And that I actually helped them live.

By adopting a dramatically non-judgemental approach, and enabling me to ask him for help, my partner made me feel more independent. I am indeed more independent, because I’m much more proactive with my own mental health and emotions. My couple made me more free and independent: I wouldn’t have believed it if you’d told me. And dude, excuse the oxymoron, but I am now one free mortgage-owner in love.


Avoir besoin des autres: cette force que je prenais pour une faiblesse

Mes ami.e.s peuvent témoigner. Et en fait ils devraient, ou en tout cas ils devraient en parler à quelqu’un, parce qu’ils doivent être ressortis pas mal traumatisés de toutes ces conneries que je leur ai dit sur l’amour pendant des années.

Je pensais qu’avoir besoin de quelqu’un était la pire chose qui puisse vous arriver. Ou plus précisément, que reconnaître le fait que vous aviez besoin de quelqu’un était la pire chose qui puisse vous arriver. Parce que bien sûr, tant qu’on prétend le contraire, personne n’en sait rien et on peut chialer tranquillement porte close.

Les moments les plus pathétiques de mon existence, je les ai vécus car je voulais tellement éviter d’être pathétique – c’est-à-dire ce que je croyais qu’on trouverait pathétique.


Voyez-vous, je suis une femme. Et j’avais lu partout, tout le temps, que personne n’aimait la chialeuse amoureuse. Partout où je regardais, la chialeuse amoureuse était une idiote. Qui aime l’éplorée snif-snif-tu-me-manques dans les films ? On soupire, en voyant ça. “Ouais bon ça va…”

Je pensais que l’amour était con, de toute façon. Et horrible. Et source de beaucoup de souffrance. Et (bordel !) tellement nécessaire.
Je trouvais l’idée même du couple restrictive, une image de soumission et de poison. J’en avais tellement peur que j’ai écrit toute une thèse de doctorat là-dessus. Si ça, ça vous dit pas à quel point j’étais flinguée de la carafe (mais dans un sens très universitaire, tout de même), je ne sais pas qu’est-ce que je dois dire pour vous convaincre.

Cette suspicion constante m’a amenée à croire que pour être un individu indépendant (que je veux toujours être, par ailleurs, même si bien des choses ont changé) je ne devais jamais demander de l’aide à personne. Pas à ma famille ni à mes amis, c’est évident. Mais avant tout : pas à mes partenaires. Rends-toi compte : quel genre de femme indépendante je serais, si un soir où c’était plutôt dur, j’appelais un mec – un mec, putain ! – pour venir m’aider ? Est-ce que je ne réaffirmerais pas ce fameux trope de la princesse ? « J’ai tellement besoin que tu me sauves car je suis tellement fragile », ce genre de trucs ?

Donc j’appelais rarement.

Et bien entendu ça me faisait vraiment chier. Parce que j’attendais que mon copain m’appelle, espérant qu’il ait besoin de m’entendre exactement au moment où moi j’avais envie de l’entendre. Espérant que je lui manque juste quand lui me manquait le plus, espérant aussi qu’il exprime ce « tu me manques » de la manière que j’imaginais moi.

Un soir, on était chez lui, je pense que d’une manière ou d’une autre on en est venus à parler de venir chez l’un ou chez l’autre. J’ai dû dire un truc évoquant le fait que des fois j’aimerais qu’il vienne mais que je ne lui disais pas, parce qu’il a dit : « Ouais je sais, j’ai remarqué que tu n’appelais pas. Mais pourquoi ?
– Ben, je sais pas (genre !)… Je ne voudrais pas que tu penses que j’aie vraiment besoin de toi.
– Tu ne veux pas me voir ?
– Si si, je veux te voir, mais je veux dire… Je ne veux pas faire la fille désespérée qui a vraiment besoin de te voir.
– D’accord. Et si un soir, admettons, tu es vraiment la fille désespérée qui a besoin de me voir, est-ce que tu m’appellerais ?
– Euh… honnêtement, je ne pense pas.
– Pourquoi?
– Parce qu’il faudrait que je le dise.
– Dise quoi?
– Que je voudrais vraiment vraiment vraiment te voir…
– Est-ce que ça serait vrai ?
– Bah bien sûr, mais alors ça voudrait dire que je suis tellement dépendante de toi, ça craint !
– Hum… Okay, donc si je résume, ce qui ne craint pas, c’est que tu ne me demande rien quand tu as envie de me voir.
– Ouais…
– … donc, en fait, la solution idéale c’est qu’on ne se voit que quand je le décide moi…
– …
– Ce qui est donc ce que l’on fait en ce moment, puisque tu ne me dis pas quand tu veux me voir.
– …
– Donc attends… pour être une femme indépendante, tu me laisses choisir où et quand on se voit, à chqaue fois.

Eeeeeeeeeh merde, je l’avais pas vu venir…

On a parlé pendant longtemps. Je lui ai dit que je ne voulais pas être un poids, que je ne voulais pas être ce qui l’empêchait d’avancer, et que, merde, je ne voulais pas être la copine qui a telllllllllement besoin de son copain.

J’ai dû apprendre qu’être indépendante ne veut certainement pas dire éviter de dire ce que l’on ressent. En fait, les gens indépendants et solides sont parfaitement capables d’exprimer inquiétudes et opinions. Et moi, dans tant d’autres cas, j’y parvenais : je pouvais parler à tout un public de questions politiques et d’actualités… Et je n’étais pas capable de dire à mon copain : « je ne me sens pas top top ce soir… Est-qu’on pourrait, chais pas, se voir et glander ensemble ? »


Quand les choses se sont détériorées pour moi concernant ma stabilité mentale, ça n’était plus juste une question de féminisme : notre cercle relationnel est primordial en termes de santé aussi. Se sentir soutenu quand on n’arrive même pas à imaginer qu’un jour cela puisse aller mieux, c’est l’une des choses qui nous aident à continuer. Alors quand on la chance incroyable d’avoir des gens qui nous aiment, et qu’on aime, quand on a mis tant d’énergie et d’effort à en faire des relations fortes et de compassion, en bénéficier n’est pas une faiblesse. Au contraire, ne pas vouloir en bénéficier, c’est aller vers l’auto-sabotage, puisque c’est quand même bien nous qui avons contribué à les rendre si profondes, ces relations. Elles ont une influence tellement forte sur nous, pourquoi ne pas prendre le bon côté de cette influence, aussi ?

Je parle de mon partenaire car c’est mon expérience. Mais cela peut être transféré à n’importe quelle relation qui compte : amants, amoureux, amis, familles, collègues…

Accepter l’amour – accepter qu’on a besoin des gens – c’est accepter qu’on nous aide. Loin d’être une faiblesse, c’ets une force qui peut sauver. Non pas à cause de ce stupide schéma du prince et de la princesse en détresse (ou prince et prince en détresse, ou princesse et princesse en détresse, et toutes les combinaisons que vous voulez) ; j’ai vu de vrais machos être sauvés par leur copines. On se sauve les uns les autres. Voilà ce qu’on fait. On ne sauve pas les autres des dragons, ni même de la mort. Pas besoin d’aller aussi si loin dans le tragique. On se sauve les uns les autres du pessimisme, du cercle incessant des pensées noires. Je peux dire ce que je veux, avec mon cynisme et mon apparent pessimisme; le seul fait que j’ai aimé, et que j’ai voulu aimer encore plus, prouve que je croyais dans le pouvoir de l’amour (hé ça, c’est pas complètement con, de dire ça par exemple ???), même si ce pouvoir c’était simplement de dire au reste du monde d’aller se faire foutre, et de croire, rien qu’une seconde, qu’on avait envie d’être avec moi. Et que je pouvais aider quelqu’un à vivre.

En adoptant cette attitude dépourvue de jugement, et en me rendant capable de lui demander de l’aide quand j’en avais besoin, mon partenaire m’a rendu plus indépendante. Je suis, en effet, plus indépendante, dans ce sens-là que je suis beaucoup plus pro-active concernant ma santé et mes émotions. Mon couple m’a rendue plus libre et indépendante : je ne vous aurais pas cru si vous me l’aviez dit. Et puis hé ho, pardon pour l’oxymore, mais je suis maintenant une heureuse et libre propriétaire de crédit.

Top

Need to Feel Inspired? Talk to the People Around You. Or Call My Mom.

french flag pastel

You too feel a bit shit at the end of the year? You too think that there’s something inherently depressing about the end of a year? Well, you and me both. That’s why I’ve stopped putting pressure on myself to have a wonderful New Year’s Eve. I just want to spend it with people I love and care about, whoever they are, and whatever we do. It no longer matters where or why.

Now I’m not going to talk in this post about how easy it is to feel like the past year’s been shit – something we hear every year anyway.


I’m going to tell you this: we’ll go through this shit together. And again, and again, and again.

Am I just a stupid optimistic? I’m not. Life sucks and hurts. We’re going to lose more people we love. We’re going to be betrayed, disrespected, we’re going to feel angry and lonely and sad, and there’s no way around it. Emotions are there. Does it mean that we’re defined by them? Does it mean we should just give up, then? I don’t think so. And this isn’t because I’ve read books on resilience. It’s because I have a wonderful mom, and today seems a good day to remind her, and all of you, that your ability to keep on going doesn’t go unnoticed; and that thanks to you, just by the simple fact that you keep going, people around you want to keep going on living too.

I’ve lost my dad this year. But hey, guess what, family can cause such funny coincidences: my mom’s lost the one man she’s loved all her life.

Saying that it’s been hard is a cruel understatement.

Yet my mom still is one of the most wonderful forms of inspiration I get every day. Precisely because she doesn’t try to be one. My mom wants to be no role model, no grief teacher. She just does her best to keep going. And she does it so fucking well.

My mom – this fills up my stomach with cold stones every time I think about it – she said when my dad died: ‘I’ve been cut in half. Now I’ll forever be cut in half.’

The pain in her voice, in her words – my mom doesn’t care for rhetoric. The pain in her shaking hands.


But my mom is forever whole. She’s even more than that. She’s ten people and a half. She definitely is part of me anyway, in addition to being herself. Because she keeps going.

My mom, in her fifties, took less than a day to decide that her life needed to be changed. She talked about moving places, and then, she did it. My mom told me: ‘so I’ve been looking for a new job over there…’

Mom, are you not scared, I wanted to scream? (I knew better than screaming that, though) New friends, new surroundings, new job and new home? Anyway, she said, without me even asking: ‘well of course that’s a bit scary. But it needs to be done. Let’s do it, then we’ll see.’

My mom is scared, and she is deeply sad, but that’s what she tells me: we’ll keep going. It’s not even a promise. It is what needs to be done.

My mom would never judge someone who gives up. She doesn’t look down on people who can’t get out of bed, let alone move places. She never, ever judged me for crying for hours for something so trivial I could feel ashamed for years. But mom, she doesn’t give up.

It doesn’t mean she doesn’t cry, and it certainly doesn’t mean she’s okay with everything that has happened. She struggles. But man, I wouldn’t want to be the one fighting against her.

When I think about the year to come, I’m overwhelmed by all the pain we’ll need to go through, again – and again – and again. Then, I remember that my mom has it right: one day at a time. It’s not a year, it’s only so many days put together. It’s not moving places, it’s one decision, and another one, and a phone call, and a discussion with an estate agent. And that’s what life is, too. Only days put together. If you feel overwhelmed, stop for a minute. Use symbols when you need to (anniversaries, rituals). The rest of the time, focus on living one day at a time. One decision at a time. By the way, we don’t always need to have things planned for the next twenty years.

My mom inspires me each time I see her, each time I think of her. My mom never read books about living in the present, but man, she’s an expert in the field.

My mom inspires me. Not that I expect her to be that strong. She knows she doesn’t have to be. But as I said: it’s precisely because she knows she doesn’t have to be, that the fact that she is so incredibly meaningful.



One day at a time, we’ll live 2016 too, and so many years after that.
Happy new year to all, and to all the incredible people out there who inspire us.


Besoin de vous sentir remotivés? Parlez aux gens autour de vous. Ou appelez ma mère.

Vous aussi, vous vous sentez un peu vaseux en fin d’année ? Vous aussi, vous pensez qu’il y a quelque chose d’intrinsèquement déprimant, dans une fin d’année ? Ouais, moi aussi. C’est pour ça que j’ai arrêté de me mettre la pression pour passer une merveilleuse Saint Sylvestre. Je veux juste la passer avec des gens que j’aime et qui comptent, quels qu’ils soient, et quel que soit le programme. Le lieu et le pourquoi n’ont plus d’importance.


Mais je ne vais pas vous parler ici d’à quel point il est facile de se dire que l’année qui vient de passer a été une année de merde – c’est ce qu’on entend chaque année de toute façon.

Je vais vous dire ceci : on sortira de cette merde-là ensemble. Encore, et encore, et encore.

Suis-je juste une débile optimiste? Non. La vie, ça casse les couilles, et ça fait mal. On perdra encore des gens qu’on aime. On se sentira trahis, on nous manquera de respect, on sera en colère, triste et terriblement seul. Pas moyen de faire autrement. Les émotions sont là. Mais est-ce que ça veut dire qu’elles nous définissent? Est-ce que ça veut dire qu’on n’a qu’à abandonner, si c’est comme ça ? Je ne pense pas. Et ce n’est pas parce que j’ai lu des livres sur la résilience. C’est parce que j’ai une mère extraordinaire, et aujourd’hui semble une opportunité parfaite de lui rappeler, et de vous rappeler à vous aussi, que votre capacité à continuer de vivre mérite qu’on la remarque. Parce que grâce à vous, grâce à ce simple fait que vous continuiez, les gens autour ont envie de continuer à se battre aussi.

J’ai perdu mon père cette année. Mais, hé, devinez quoi, la famille peut être à l’origine de marrantes coïncidences : ma mère a perdu l’homme qu’elle a aimé toute sa vie.


Dire que ça a été difficile, c’est si cruellement faible qu’il vaut mieux ne rien dire.

Et pourtant ma mère est encore aujourd’hui l’une des plus merveilleuses sources d’inspiration, ou forces de motivation, que je reçois chaque jour. Précisément parce qu’elle ne fait pas les choses pour en être une. Ma mère ne désire pas être un modèle, ni une prof de comment faire un deuil. Elle fait juste de son mieux pour continuer. Et elle le fait putain de bien.

Ma mère – ça me remplit l’estomac de pierres gelées chaque fois que j’y pense – elle a dit quand mon père est décédé : ‘ça m’a coupée en deux. Maintenant je suis pour toujours coupée en deux.’

La douleur dans sa voix, dans ses mots. Ma mère s’en balance, de la rhétorique. Sa douleur, dans ses mains qui tremblent.

Pourtant ma mère est pour toujours entière. Elle est même bien plus que ça. Elle est dix personnes et demie. En tout cas, elle est dans moi en partie, en plus d’être elle-même. Parce qu’elle continue sa route.

Ma mère, la cinquantaine passée, a mis moins d’un jour pour décider que sa vie devait changer. Elle a parlé de déménager, et puis, elle l’a fait. Ma mère me disait : « donc j’ai cherché un nouveau boulot là-bas… »

Mais maman, tu n’as pas peur, je voulais gueuler? (je savais qu’il valait mieux que je ne le fasse pas) Nouveaux amis, nouvel environnement, nouveau travail, nouveau foyer ? Elle a répondu, sans que j’aie besoin de lui demander : « oui bah bien sûr que ça fait un peu peur. Mais je dois le faire. On va le faire, et puis on verra bien. »

Ma mère angoisse, et est profondément triste, mais voici ce qu’elle me dit : on va continuer à vivre. C’est même pas une promesse. C’est ce qu’on doit faire.

Ma mère ne jugerait jamais quelqu’un qui abandonne. Elle ne regarde pas avec arrogance les gens qui n’arrivent même plus à quitter leur lit, alors déménager n’en parlons pas. Elle ne m’a jamais jugée quand je chialais pendant des heures pour un truc si futile que je pourrais en avoir honte pendant des années. Mais ma mère, elle n’abandonne pas.

Ça ne veut pas dire qu’elle ne pleure pas. Et ça ne veut certainement pas dire qu’elle est cool avec ce qui s’est passé. Elle lutte. Mais mon gars, j’aimerais pas être celle qui me bat contre elle.

Quand je pense à l’année à venir, je me sens quasi noyée par la douleur qu’on devra vivre, encore, et encore, et encore. Et puis je me souviens que ma mère a raison ; un jour à la fois. Ce n’est pas une année, en fait, c’est juste des jours qu’on met à la suite. Ce n’est pas un déménagement, c’est une décision, et puis une autre, et puis un coup de téléphone, une conversation avec un agent immobilier. La vie, c’est ça aussi. Juste des jours regroupés ensemble. Si vous vous sentez submergés, arrêtez-vous deux secondes. Utilisez vos symboles quand vous en avez besoin (anniversaires, rituels). Le reste du temps, concentrez-vous sur un jour à la fois. Une décision à la fois. D’ailleurs, on n’a pas toujours besoin de planifier pour les vingt ans à venir.

Ma mère me donne de la force et de la motivation chaque fois que je la vois, chaque fois que je pense à elle. Ma mère n’a jamais lu de bouquins qui apprennent à vivre dans le moment présent. Mais bordel, elle est est experte dans ce domaine.

Ma mère me donne de la force et de la motivation. Pas parce que j’attends d’elle qu’elle soit forte. Elle sait qu’elle n’a pas à l’être. Mais comme je l’ai dit : c’est justement parce qu’elle sait bien qu’elle n’a pas à être forte, que le fait qu’elle le soit a tellement de sens.

Un jour à la fois, on vivra 2016 aussi, et plein d’années après ça.

Bonne année à tous, et à tous ces gens qui nous inspirent et nous aident à vivre.

Top

Choices and Pain – Mission: Not Impossible

french flag pastel

At last, I had admitted to living with depression and a rather severe case of OCD. I had finally used words to express the fact that my feet were stuck in concrete as soon as I was about to get up in the morning. You might think I was therefore ready to accept things for what they were, to accept reality.

But I kept getting mistaken for quite a while, still. A while when I believed that to choose necessarily meant: not getting hurt.

Allow me to elaborate.

I’m chatting with a friend on the phone. We’re trying to understand how and why I ended up there. – At the time, she’s one of the few to whom I’ve told that word: depression. As she’s putting together a list of events, she says: ‘and it’s true also that you’ve moved places so many times these last few years…’ I don’t know what she’s on about. I try to tell her she got it wrong: ‘no, each time I moved places, I had decided I would. I chose, everytime.
– So… ?
– So it’s not as if I’d been forced to move. So… I can’t have been hurt by it. It can’t have anything to do with my breakdown.’

We’re both silent.

Then my friend says this, without being impatient, without sighing: ‘you realise, though, that some decisions can hurt us, even if we made them?’

Well, no.

No I hadn’t realised that.

For me, there were only two possibilities in life: either you choose stuff, then you’re happy and that’s awesome. Or you don’t choose stuff, then you’re miserable and it sucks.

I was convinced that whatever we had chosen couldn’t hurt us in any way. Rather: that we weren’t allowed to feel pain or get hurt. Because for a long time I’ve had these verbs, ‘moaning’ and ‘getting hurt’, mixed up.

But we need to face that fact, even though we feel guilty for it. Of course there will be things we’ll choose and never regret, and it’ll still be hurtful to make those decisions. Sometimes it’ll hurt for years. This doesn’t mean than we necessarily have to suffer from our decisions – if not, then that’s great! But indeed, it’s possible that something hurts, even when you’ve decided it yourself.

A break-up. A farewell. A divorce; or two; three divorces. An abortion. Or being a mother when you didn’t really want to be one. No longer seeing a member of one’s family. No longer meeting a close friend, whom we no longer understand. Leaving a job for a partner we love. Leaving our partner for a job we love. Or leaving them both, partner and jobs, and go live in Mongolia because we can’t make up our minds.

I had never thought that if something hurt, it meant a bad decision was made. I’ve thought so many times that I didn’t regret my choices, and that I’d make exactly the same choices again should I need to, even when they were painful. Truth be told, though: to avoid the whole situation, I removed myself from the process far before this could happen. For I am a bit naive, so I thought that pain could only exist if you mentioned it. No pain mentioned = no pain at all. After shutting up for a while, you’d end up believing it was true.

Let’s add a bit of self-loathing into the mix: ‘hey bitch, you’re not seriously moaning about travelling, are you!?!’

However, I could have buried my head in the sand all I wanted, the thing is, moving places is the third cause of depression after grief and getting fired. Moving places can shake you pretty hard. It’s about determining the value of your life again, depending on the amount of boxes, or books, or outrageously expensive watches, depending on your lifestyle. It’s about being reminded that you are, after all, pretty much like this pile of admin stuff and bills, or like a bunch of this crap you never use. Then, you also need a new social life: meeting new people, liking them, hating them, respecting etiquette, being disappointed, inviting someone over for the first time, fearing they’d judge us as soon as they’d be in your place, being nice – although not too nice, caring – although not too much, being funny – although not too funny.

What’s more, when we live with OCD, change is particularly scary. It must be said. All common patterns are blown away, the environment gets more unwelcoming, you need to start from scratch again. Not that you had evolved a lot further from this, but still, you’re going back to square one. You take a look at the cooker eighteenth more times, because you’re not used to the way its buttons are oriented. And the front door… How can I know I’ve locked it, I don’t know it? No confidence whatsoever, doubts rising. What if electricity is not working properly here, and my alarm won’t go off? Shit I need to double(and more)-check. And oh my god it’s 11pm but I need to go to work right now to ensure that I don’t take the wrong path tomorrow.

I’ve changed countries, environments, walls and friend circles. I’ve moved out with a car, just my feet, on a plane or a train. And I had never realised it could have impacted me.

On the phone, I said to my friend: ‘you know, I’m lucky, I’m well aware of that! It’s a wonderful act of freedom, being able to do so.
– Does it mean it’s all easy, then?
– … Fuck it. You might be right.’

Still to this day, there are times I’m mistaken. I take getting hurt for complaining, moaning about stuff. And I believe you can’t moan about something you’ve chosen.

Yes, I think complaining about your own choices may not be very constructive. However, I have since then understood that to confess you feel weak doesn’t mean you’re moaning.

I’ve moved again recently. It was a choice. I’m lucky. But even then it was bloody hard not to look forty times at the cooker. Now, I think I got how to say it, without fearing I’m a bourgeoise with my diamond shoes too tight: I’m happy about it. It hasn’t been easy every day, but I’m happy I’ve done it.



Feeling hurt isn’t a passive state for professional complainers. Feeling hurt is also a choice, that of looking at things the way they are, and say: ‘Well, it damn hurts. But it’s not the end of the story yet.’ That’s about choice. Feeling hurt is about keeping going, because the after-pain is going to be so worth it. Now stop me please, because in two seconds I’m going to tell you that to get hurt is to be an optimist.

Oops. Too late.


Choisir et souffrir : mission pas impossible

J’avais enfin admis ma dépression et l’état plutôt alarmant de mes TOC, osé poser des mots sur le fait que je sentais mes pieds pris dans du ciment dès le lever. On pourrait croire que j’étais enfin prête à voir les choses clairement, à accepter la réalité.

Pourtant, je me suis plantée encore un bon moment. Moment pendant lequel j’ai cru que choisir, c’était forcément ne pas souffrir.

J’explique.

Alors qu’une amie discute avec moi au téléphone du pourquoi et du comment j’ai pu en arriver là (à ce moment-là, elle est parmi les seules à qui j’ai dit le mot dépression), elle me dit, après avoir énuméré certains événements : « et puis, c’est vrai aussi que tu as déménagé tellement ces dernières années… » Je ne comprends pas bien là où elle veut en venir. Je tente de lui signaler qu’elle fait fausse route : « ah non mais ça, c’est moi qui l’ai choisi, à chaque fois.
– Et alors?
– Eh ben alors c’est pas comme si on m’avait forcée. Donc ça, ça n’a pas pu me faire souffrir. Ça n’a pas pu contribuer à la chute. »

Un gros blanc.

Et puis mon amie énonce clairement, sans soupirer, sans impatience : « tu es consciente que certaines décisions, même si c’est nous qui les prenons, peuvent nous faire souffrir quand même? »

Ha ben non.

Non, je n’en étais pas consciente.
Pour moi, il y avait deux possibilités dans la vie : ou bien tu choisis les choses, et donc t’as de la chance c’est super. Ou bien tu ne les choisis pas, et alors c’est l’horreur et tu souffres.

J’avais la conviction que ce qu’on choisissait, on n’en souffrait pas. Plutôt : qu’on n’avait pas le droit d’en souffrir. Oui, j’ai longtemps confondu souffrir et se plaindre, aussi.

Pourtant admettons-le, même si on se sent coupable de se dire des trucs comme ça : bien sûr qu’il y a des tas de choses que l’on choisit que l’on ne regrettera jamais, mais qui nous font néanmoins souffrir, parfois pendant des années. Ce qui ne veut pas dire que l’on souffre forcément de ses décisions (tant mieux si ça n’est pas le cas, évidemment!), mais oui, on peut en souffrir, alors même qu’on les a prises en notre âme et conscience.

Une séparation amoureuse. Un départ définitif. Un divorce, ou deux, ou trois. Un avortement. Ou au contraire être mère alors qu’on ne le voulait pas réellement. Arrêter de parler à un membre de sa famille. Couper les ponts pour de bon avec une amie très proche, avec qui on ne se comprend plus. Quitter un travail qu’on adore pour son conjoint. Quitter son conjoint pour un travail qu’on adore. Quitter les deux et partir vivre en Mongolie parce qu’on ne peut pas choisir.

Je n’ai jamais pensé que si une chose nous faisait souffrir, c’est qu’elle découlait nécessairement d’une mauvaise décision. Je me suis dit plein de fois que je ne regrettais pas ce que j’avais choisi, et que je referais les même choix, même si j’en avais souffert, si je devais les refaire. Mais la vérité, c’est que pour couper court, je choisissais de mettre fin au processus en amont : je ne voulais pas souffrir. Et comme je suis un peu naïve, je croyais que la douleur ça n’existait que si on la disait. En la fermant, on finirait bien par se convaincre que tout allait bien.

Ajoutez à ça un soupçon de mépris de soi : « ben oui, connasse, tu vas pas te plaindre alors que tu voyages en plus!?! »

J’ai eu beau faire l’autruche, ça n’est pas pour rien que les déménagements sont la troisième cause de dépression après le deuil et le licenciement. Ça remet tellement de choses en question, ça amène à chaque fois à ré-évaluer sa vie en nombre de cartons, sa valeur sociale en poids de bouquins ou de montres de luxe, c’est selon. On se rappelle qu’on est surtout une bonne dose de papiers administratifs et de trucs qui ne servent à rien. Et il faut recommencer à exister socialement : rencontrer de nouvelles personnes, bien les aimer, les détester, respecter les conventions sociales, être déçue, inviter pour la première fois, avoir peur qu’on nous juge sitôt passé la porte, être gentille, mais pas trop, attentionnée, mais pas trop, rigolote, mais pas trop.

Et puis, en ce qui concerne les TOC, le changement est particulièrement effrayant, il faut bien le dire : tous les repères flingués, un environnement hostile, tout reprendre à zéro (pas qu’on soit partis de beaucoup plus haut, mais bon, ça fait toujours une rechute). Regarder la nouvelle cuisinière dix-huit fois de plus car on n’a pas l’habitude de la manière dont sont orientés les boutons. Et la porte d’entrée. Comment être sûre qu’elle ferme, je ne la connais pas? Confiance en rien, encore plus de doutes. Et si le circuit électrique était pourri et que mon réveil ne sonnait pas? Et si j’oubliais de me lever pour mon premier jour au travail? Est-ce que je ne l’aurais pas débranché en le vérifiant, ce radio-réveil? Bordel il faut que je re-vérifie. Et oh mon dieu il est 23h mais il faut que je refasse le chemin jusqu’au travail pour être sûre que demain je ne me trompe pas de route.

J’ai changé de pays, j’ai changé d’environnement, de murs et d’entourage. J’ai déménagé en voiture, à pied, en avion et en train. Dans ma tête aussi. Et je ne m’étais jamais vraiment rendu compte que ça avait pu m’affecter.

Au téléphone, j’ai dit à mon amie : « mais tu sais, j’ai de la chance, j’en ai conscience, hein! C’est une liberté extraordinaire de pouvoir faire ça.
– Et ça veut dire que tout est facile?
– … Putain. Ça fait chier, t’as peut-être bien raison. »

Encore aujourd’hui, je sais qu’il y a plein de fois où je confonds. Je crois que souffrir c’est se plaindre. Et je crois qu’on n’a pas le droit de se plaindre d’un truc qu’on a choisi.

Je pense toujours qu’il est peu constructif de se plaindre d’un truc qu’on a choisi. Mais depuis, j’ai compris que tout aveu de faiblesse n’était pas forcément une complainte.

J’ai déménagé à nouveau il n’y a pas longtemps. C’est entièrement un choix. J’ai de la chance. Mais j’ai quand même eu un mal de chien à regarder moins de quarante fois la cuisinière. Maintenant j’ai compris comment le dire pour ne pas avoir l’impression de chialer d’être une bourge avec des chaussures en diamant trop serrées: je suis super contente. Ça n’a pas été facile facile tous les jours, mais je suis tellement contente de l’avoir fait.

Souffrir ça n’est pas juste un état passif de gens râleurs. C’est aussi choisir de se regarder en face, et se dire : « Ouais, bordel. J’ai mal. Mais ça ne s’arrête pas là. » C’est ce choix-là, souffrir, ce choix de continuer, parce qu’au fond, l’après souffrance vaut tellement le coup. Arrêtez-moi là cela dit, car dans deux secondes je vais vous dire que souffrir, c’est presque une marque d’optimisme.

Oups. Trop tard.

Top

Will I ever be able to work again? What happens after long-term sick leave.

french flag pastel

OCD and depression made me unable to perform my job. I was no longer able to function on a day-to-day basis. Put together, my sick leave and the time I then stayed off work (after resigning, resting, and then looking for a new job) equates roughly a year. It’s not that long compared to what some may face, but it was long enough to make me question my very ability to work again. I was thinking: what if in every job I try, this depressive cycle goes on?

That’s true. That cycle needs to get broken.

It doesn’t mean you have to resign or to change jobs. I did, but that’s only because in my case it was necessary. I know plenty of people who came back to their old job after long-term sickness. And they’re okay, and they’re great at what they’re doing. Here’s the thing: if you think that what you do can make you happy, then of course it’s worth fighting for it.

In this case, what you probably fear the most is the look and judgements from other colleagues. You think they’d consider you not reliable. You believe they think you’re on the verge of breaking down any minute. Let me tell you something: that’s not true. There are two categories of people. Those who are judgemental and those who are not. If they are judgemental, they won’t start judging you because of mental health issues. They’ve done it long before. So don’t worry, if they speak negatively of you, it is NOT because you had issues. It’s just because they do talk about other people, and nothing you can do can change them if they’ve decided to see things that way. Now the other category of people are non-judgemental (okay, I admit that there are some grey areas in between too, but let’s keep things simple for the sake of the argument). That means that whatever you experience, they won’t think your worth depends on how long a sick leave you take, or how many crises you’ve experienced.


I made the mistake of thinking that if you ever reach the point of going on sick leave for months due to mental health issues, people will no longer trust you. I thought: what’s the point of staying somewhere? I’ll never been given any responsibilities again. If that’s what you think too, I beg you to look at your surroundings with honesty. Don’t you know many people who’ve never experienced some sort of crisis? If we didn’t trust people who’ve had difficulties in their lives, let me tell you something… There wouldn’t be many people working.

It’s a bit like with people you know outside of work. You think that because they know you’ve been a wreck, they’ll never ask you for any advice, they’ll never listen to your opinion any more. What is a sick person’s opinion worth anyway?… Then one day, they do ask you something. You check behind you: is that really you they’re talking to??? How come? Do they really, what… trust you?? You seem surprised. I sure was. But people are just like you: they had their breakdowns too. And yet they are normal people, they keep going. You’ll be trusted again, don’t worry.

Now the question really is: will I ever be able to perform any kind of work? Well that’s a difficult thought when you’re exhausted only five minutes after getting up. But let’s break it down so that it’s more manageable.

First of all, are you able to go back to your previous job? I think in most cases you are, and that’s precisely why people do it. I admire them. They take a break, breathe scream and cry, then start again. If you’re in a job where you think you can be happy one day – even if it means you’re not really happy right now – maybe it’s worth fighting for. I say: ‘maybe’, because I’m no life coach. It depends on what you want in life. And how long you can accept to try.

Second of all, what if you’re afraid that actually, you’ll never be happy in what you’re doing? Well perhaps then, it’s time to assess other possibilities. I realised I needed to change jobs when I had this thought: even if everything goes in the best possible way, I can’t say I’d be happy. There would still be far too much stress, not because of the job, but because of my anxiety. I’m in a job where a personality like mine can never relax. I can never know any break. And I need breaks. Took me years to realise, but yes, I do. Worse still: I want breaks.

So I decided to change.

Now I’m truly happy. Not because everything’s perfect, some days are shit too, but now my job is what it’s supposed to be: something that helps me live. I had to reflect on many things when I chose to make that decision.

You have to realise that what is right is only right for you. For instance, now I work in a library. I spend my days shelving books and tidying up. And I’m not kidding, that’s damn reassuring. With my OCD, I thought I needed to find something where repetition and order are part of the job (because I’d do it anyway), but where the pressure to do this is not too high. Let me explain this. If I don’t shelve a book correctly, nobody’s going to die (although I have occasionally considered this possibility – that’s what OCD does, but I know I can fight the idea on the ground of statistical probabilities, and thanks to CBT). I couldn’t clean and tidy up surgery stuff, for instance. I certainly couldn’t check someone for safety on a fair ride. But books? I’m okay with those.

However, I won’t tell you it’s the dream job for someone who has OCD. It depends on what OCD you have, and of course your personality. A certain amount of repetition is what I need, what I look for. But to other people, it could be a nightmare. Every morning, I go to work knowing that the tasks are pretty much gonna be similar to those of yesterday, and that tomorrow, they’ll be too. I find this incredibly helpful. Some people would find it terrifying and terribly boring. So that’s what I mean: just what reassures you? What does give you balance?

I know when I changed jobs job description wasn’t the only thing I had to consider, too. I, for one, wanted my job to end with the end of the day. I no longer wanted to have poor work-life balance, because I am unable to give myself breaks. Some people are excellent at that. I clearly wasn’t. I needed a job where I don’t ever bring work home. Where even if I obsess over stuff I did at work, there was nothing I could do about them. No essay I’d be re-marking for the third time. No lesson plan I would overdo, and start again from scratch at 3am.

So you wonder: will you ever be able to work again? I’m pleased to say that the answer, in the vast majority of cases, is a big : yes, you will. The first thing you need to do, though, is accept that sick leave and getting off work for what can seem a long time is no mistake, and no laziness. Fight the guilt and the fear of judgements from colleagues and managers alike. Let’s turn something sad into something great: many of us will need to take time off work (very sad fact). Which is precisely why many of us will show understanding and compassion. (great stuff!)

Don’t’worry about what other people think you are capable of. But do, seriously, ask yourself a question: not ‘what am I capable of?’ but: ‘what do I want to be capable of?’ Because it’s nice to be ambitious if you want. But it’s also absolutely fine not to be.


Est-ce que j’arriverai un jour à reprendre le travail ? Ce qui se passe après un long arrêt maladie.

Les TOC et la dépression m’ont rendue incapable de faire mon travail. Je n’arrivais plus à fonctionner au quotidien. Mis bout à bout, mon arrêt maladie et le temps que j’ai ensuite passé sans activité professionnelle (après ma démission, du repos, et une nouvelle recherche d’emploi) représentent environ une année. Ce n’est pas si long comparé à ce que certains doivent traverser, mais ça a été suffisamment long pour que je remette en question ma capacité à travailler. Je me disais : et si dans tous les boulots que je prenais, ce cycle de la dépression revenait ?

Parce que c’est vrai. Il faut briser ce cycle-là.

Ça ne signifie pas qu’il faille nécessairement démissionner ou changer de boulot. C’est ce que j’ai fait, mais parce que dans mon cas, c’était nécessaire. Je connais plein de gens qui retournent à leur travail après un long arrêt maladie. Ils vont bien, et ils sont doués pour ce qu’ils font. Si vous pensez que ce que vous faites peut vous rendre heureux, alors bien sûr que ça vaut le coup de se battre pour.

Dans ce cas-là, ce que vous craigniez certainement le plus, c’est le regard et les jugements de vos collègues. Vous pensez qu’ils vont vous voir comme quelqu’un sur qui on ne peut pas compter. Vous croyez qu’ils sont là à se dire : il/elle est sur le point de craquer à chaque instant. Laissez-moi vous dire quelque chose : c’est faux. Il y a grosso modo deux catégories de gens : ceux qui jugent, et ceux qui ne jugent pas. Ceux qui jugent ont commencé à vous juger bien avant vos problèmes de santé. Alors ne craigniez rien, s’ils parlent de vous en mal, ce n’est pas dû à vos soucis de santé. C’est juste dû au fait qu’ils parlent dans le dos des autres, et vous ne pouvez rien y faire tant qu’ils n’ont pas décidé eux-mêmes de changer. L’autre catégorie (bon okay, j’avoue, ça n’est pas que blanc/noir et il y a des zones grises, mais restons simples pour faciliter l’argumentation). Ça signifie que quoique vous viviez, ils ne penseront pas que votre valeur se mesure en nombre de jours d’arrêt maladie, ou grâce au total de vos moments de crise.

J’ai fait l’erreur de croire que si l’on allait jusqu’au point d’être en arrêt maladie pendant plusieurs mois, personne ne nous ferait plus jamais confiance. Je me disais : à quoi ça sert, de rester à cet endroit, à ce poste ? On ne me donnera plus jamais de responsabilités. Et si c’est ce que vous vous dites vous aussi, je vous implore de regarder autour de vous honnêtement. Ne connaissez-vous pas vous-mêmes pas mal de gens qui ont connu des états de crise ? Si on ne faisait plus jamais confiance aux gens qui ont connu des difficultés au cours de leur vie… ben y aurait plus grand monde pour aller bosser.

C’est un peu comme avec les gens que vous connaissez hors du travail. Vous pensez que parce qu’ils savent que vous avez été une loque à un moment donné, ils n’écouteront plus jamais ce que vous avez à dire, ni ne vous demanderont plus jamais conseil. Qu’est-ce que ça pourrait bien valoir, l’opinion de quelqu’un qui a un grain, de toute façon ? Et puis un jour quelqu’un vous pose une question. Vous vérifiez derrière vous: c’est vraiment à vous qu’il s’adresse ??? Comment ça se fait ? Est-ce que vraiment il… me fait confiance ?? Vous avez l’air surpris. Personnellement oui, ça m’a surprise. Mais les gens sont comme vous: ils ont eu leur moment de craquage, aussi. Pourtant ce sont des gens normaux, qui continuent leur route. On vous fera confiance à nouveau, pas d’inquiétude.


Alors la question, c’est celle-ci : est-ce que j’arriverai un jour à rebosser, quel que soit le travail ? C’est en effet difficile à concevoir quand vous êtes épuisé cinq minutes seulement après être sorti du lit. Procédons donc par étape pour y répondre.

La première chose à savoir, c’est si vous vous sentez capable de retourner à votre poste. Je crois que c’est possible dans la plupart des cas, et c’est pourquoi les gens le font. Je les admire. Ils prennent une pause, respirent hurlent et pleurent, et ils recommencent. Si vous faites un travail qui, selon vous, peut vous rendre heureux un jour (même si là tout de suite vous n’êtes pas forcément heureux), peut-être que ça vaut le coup de se battre pour y rester. Je dis « peut-être », parce que je ne suis pas une coach ni une psy. Ça dépend de ce que vous espérez de la vie. Et de combien temps vous êtes prêts à essayer.

La deuxième chose qui fait peur, c’est de savoir si vous pourrez jamais être heureux dans un boulot, quel qu’il soit. Si c’est ce que vous vous dites, alors il est temps d’envisager plusieurs voies. J’ai réalisé que je devais changer de travail quand cette pensée m’est venue : même si tout se passait du mieux possible, je ne pense pas pouvoir dire que je serais heureuse. Il y aurait toujours beaucoup trop de stress, pas à cause du boulot, mais à cause de mes angoisses. Je suis dans une voie où une personnalité comme la mienne est incapable de trouver du repos. Je ne peux jamais connaître de vraies pauses. Et j’ai besoin de pauses. Ça m’a pris des années pour m’en rendre compte, mais oui, j’en ai besoin. Pire : j’en ai envie.

C’est là que j’ai décidé de changer.

Maintenant je suis vraiment heureuse. Pas parce que tout est parfait, bien sûr qu’il y a des jours de merde aussi. Mais mon boulot est maintenant ce qu’il doit être : quelque chose qui m’aide à vivre. J’ai dû réfléchir à pas mal de trucs quand j’ai pris cette décision.

Notamment, il est essentiel de voir que ce qui est bon pour nous ne l’est peut-être que pour nous. Par exemple, je travaille maintenant dans une bibliothèque. Je passe mes journées à mettre en rayon des livres et à ranger. Et je vous jure, je trouve ça incroyablement rassurant. Avec mes TOC, je me suis dit qu’il me fallait trouver quelque chose où la répétition et l’ordre faisaient partie intégrante du travail, mais pas au point que la pression y soit trop élevée. Laisse-moi m’expliquer un peu mieux. Si je ne mets pas un livre exactement à sa bonne place, personne ne va mourir (bien que je me le sois parfois demandée, car c’est ça que me font les TOC, mais je sais que je peux lutter contre cette idée en prenant appui sur des probabilités statistiques, et aussi grâce aux outils de thérapie cognitivo-comportementale). Je ne pourrais pas, par exemple, nettoyer et ranger du matériel de chirurgie. Et je ne pourrais certainement pas veiller à la sécurité des gens sur un manège dans une foire. Mais des livres ? Ça me va.

Pourtant, je ne vais pas vous dire que c’est le travail parfait pour quelqu’un qui a des TOC. Cela dépend de quel TOC vous avez, et de votre personnalité, bien sûr. Un certain volume de répétition est ce dont j’ai besoin, ce que je recherche. Mais pour d’autres, cela peut s’avérer un cauchemar. Tous les matins, je me rends au travail en pensant que les taches à mener seront similaires à celles la veille, et que demain, elles le seront aussi. Cela m’aide à un point ! Alors que d’autres trouveraient cela effrayant et terriblement ennuyeux. C’est ça, que je veux dire : qu’est-ce qui vous rassure ? Qu’est-ce qui vous donne un équilibre ?

J’ai su lorsque j’ai changé de travail que le contenu du poste n’était pas l’unique facteur à retenir. Je voulais, pour ma part, que mon travail finisse à la fin de la journée. Je ne voulais plus avoir un rapport vie privée-vie professionnelle si déséquilibré, parce que je suis incapable de m’autoriser des pauses. Certains sont excellents dans ce domaine. Clairement, moi je ne l’étais pas. J’avais besoin d’un boulot que je ne ramènerais pas à la maison. Un travail où même si je me repassais encore et encore des scènes de la journée, il n’y ait rien que je puisse y faire. Plus de copie à corriger pour la troisième fois. Plus de cours à sur-préparer, et à recommencer encore à trois heures du matin.

Vous vous demandez si vous pourrez un jour reprendre le travail ? Je suis ravie de vous dire que dans la grande majorité des cas, la réponse est : oui, vous le pourrez. La première chose à faire, cependant, c’est comprendre que prendre un arrêt maladie et ne pas travailler pendant un long moment n’est ni une erreur, ni de la paresse. Luttez contre la culpabilité et les jugements de vos collègues ou de vos chefs. D’un fait assez moche, voyons une belle réalité : beaucoup d’entre nous aurons besoin d’arrêter de travailler pendant un moment (c’est moche), mais c’est précisément pour ça que beaucoup d’entre nous sommes capables de faire preuve de compréhension et d’empathie (belle réalité, non?).

Cessez de vous demander ce dont les autres pensent que vous êtes capables. Mais posez-vous sérieusement une question ; non pas : « de quoi suis-je capable ? » mais : « de quoi ai-je envie d’être capable ? » Parce que c’est bien d’être ambitieux si vous le souhaitez. Mais ne pas l’être peut être un choix tout aussi respectable et judicieux.

Top