New Diagnosis

IMG_20191213_112238504_HDR

french flag pastel

There are results you fear more than others.

On Thursday night, I was rushed to the hospital. Hours earlier, my GP had asked me to see him, after my blood results had returned: it wasn’t said on the phone nor on the letter, but they were “quite alarming”, he confirmed when I met him. My blood sugar level was 17, when it should have been less than 5.4. A urine sample confirmed that my ketones level was 2.2, instead of an acceptable 0.6. I hadn’t even heard of ketones until that day. When the doctor said, « Your body has gone into starvation mode », I said, « Well I sure haven’t! » And I laughed. He didn’t.

– No, really. You need to go to the hospital right now for an assessment.
– And that would be to assess…?
– Do you have a history of diabetes in your family?

From then on it all went really fast, and a bit surreal. I was to go home, prepare an overnight bag in case the hospital wanted to keep me, wait for the ambulance. He said the words: « You’re diabetic ». Wait, am I? I would know it if I was, wouldn’t I? Wait! Wouldn’t I?

When the ambulance arrived, one of the two paramedics was quite surprised to see me « so well ». I tried to make a few jokes, to avoid showing I was uncomfortable myself. I didn’t tell him the reason I couldn’t drive was OCD. I just said as I always do, “I’m sorry I don’t drive”. He was cross someone had called an ambulance for me, when I could have gone in a car. I apologized again. He said it wasn’t my fault, but I was the one listening to him as he explained that I was “taking the space of a sick patient”. After that, we didn’t talk very much. Especially after he asked me about current medication as he was filling in a form on his Ipad, and I said Fluoxetine.

– And why are you taking it?
– OCD and depression.

I didn’t talk about the guilt.

At the hospital we went from service to service to see where I should go.

– You’ve got a bad foot?
– That? Oh, no, it’s nothing! Just a foot drop.
– Isn’t it why you’re here?
– No, it’s my blood.

They asked me to sit down in A&E. A little over two hours later, a nurse came to get me. I had tried to read a novel after seeing a sign on the wall: “4-5 hours on 12/12/19 @ 17.00 to be seen by a doctor from time of arrival.”

As blood formed droplets on my fingertips, people were voting for the future of the UK. The future of the NHS. I was worried. I had been for weeks. And now even this new diagnosis (I wasn’t sure: was it for certain yet? Were we still wondering if I had diabetes or was it a done deal?) wasn’t pushing the fear away. Quite the contrary: sat on a public hospital chair, being careful not to put blood everywhere, it was getting closer and closer. There I was, a European immigrant to the UK, waiting to be assessed for free by a medical system which had known cuts after cuts over the last few years.

My blood sugar level had increased. In French, when we worry, we say that we “make bad blood” (“se faire du mauvais sang”). I no longer wanted to laugh, though, sitting on a chair in this overcrowded ward. Half an hour passed. Or was it an hour? Minutes after they had admitted me in a cubicle for more blood tests, I could hear them talk behind the blue curtain: “It’s way too high. She needs to be seen by the doctor.” The nurse looked at my other arm, found a vein. It was only salted water, I was told.

It was about 10pm and the first estimates were in: Conservative 368, Labour 191. I switched off the phone screen. I didn’t feel like commenting at all. It was a done deal. If it turned out to be type 1, it’d have always been.

After three hours in the ward, I was moved to a different cubicle.

– So, you’re diabetic?
– Apparently so.
– You didn’t know?
– I definitely didn’t know.
– Why did you see your GP?
– Because of a foot drop. I’m also very dehydrated. I might have been drinking between 4 and 5 litres of water a day since September.
– Can you walk for me?

I walked for them.

Polling stations were now closed. It was 1am.

– At least I can confirm the results are back, and you’ve haven got Diabetic ketoacidosis.
– Oh, that’s good!
– You’re familiar with Diabetic ketoacidosis?
– Well, I’ve been reading the NHS website as I was waiting…

I was brought a bed. A stretcher, actually. I so wanted to lie down. Nurses could see this as I was shrinking on my chair, doing nothing – couldn’t read, nor my book or my phone. They spent their time apologizing: “Sorry you had to wait for so long, it’s so busy tonight. We have a bed shortage.” Like the man in the ambulance, it was my turn to say: “It isn’t your fault. Please don’t worry. It isn’t your fault.” The nurse injected insulin into my body for the very first time.

Votes were still being counted as I lay below the aggressive light of the ward. After one hour, I was given two blankets. I put one over my head to make it dark. The man waiting on another stretcher, next to me, said: “Well, now I’ve seen it all!” Later, he would give me money, asking me to go to the cafe (he couldn’t walk) and bring £70 worth of cake and biscuits for all the nurses. “It’s Christmas, after all.” The biscuits were tree-shaped and had red and gold topping. Tinsels had been stuck to the walls.

Every hour and a half since arrival, a nurse would check my temperature (36.4), my blood pressure (I have no idea what it was), my blood sugar level, sometimes my ketones level too (now 3.1). When my blood sugar level reached 25.8 around 3am, they said we needed to do it again, to make sure. It was too high, far too high. The new reading was 26.4. “If it isn’t better in one hour, we’ll need to give you more insulin”. I dropped in and out of sleep. It got better (19), and at about 5am I was moved to the Medical Assessment Unit. I wanted to walk, but they said: “No no no, stay on the stretcher.” Watching the ceiling unfold, I listened to the nurses’ conversation, and obviously didn’t understand who they were talking about, but someone had lost their baby. Sadness came to sit on my chest.

The new location was a lot more comfortable: there was a proper bed, and the lights were dim. I changed into the night gown they gave me, and tried to sleep.

From 7am onwards, I spent the day being seen by medical staff. I had my first education about diabetes. First, an expert came to explain what it was, remind me of the pancreas’ role, and why they thought there – as did my GP – that I was a type 1. Then another doctor came to explain how to use an insulin flexpen, and the reader I’ll be given to test my blood sugar level. I was given needles. Lancets. A yellow safe box to dispose of them. Another expert came to give me a whole pile of leaflets. One of them read: “Diabetes and emotional well-being”. There was some sort of magazine, too: “Everyday life with Type 1 diabetes”.

– So, that’s a bit of a shock, isn’t it?
– It is, I suppose.
– How do you feel about it all?
– Absolutely fine, thank you.
– Mmh. Are you sure?
– Yes, I am.
– You’re going to be okay.
– Oh, I know.
– Don’t worry.

Between discussions and blood controls, I watched my Facebook and Twitter timelines. The people of the UK had spoken, and I wasn’t best pleased with what they had to say – nor were most of my friends. I wasn’t alone. And Q. had said he would come straight after work if I needed to.

A newly diagnosed diabetic immigrant in a British hospital, I could finally go outside to smoke a cigarette, the first one in 14 hours. On my way to the main entrance, I noticed a plaque:

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of
the National Health Service
and
the official opening of
Derriford hospital
on 22nd August 1988
by
the Prime Minister
the right honourable
Margaret Thatcher, FRS MP

Speaking of important dates, it was now Friday 13th.

 


 

Nouveau diagnostic

Il y a des résultats qu’on redoute plus que d’autres.

Jeudi soir, j’ai été amenée d’urgence à l’hôpital. Quelques heures plus tôt, mon généraliste m’avait demandé de venir le voir après que mes analyses de sang étaient revenues : on ne me l’avait pas dit au téléphone ou sur la lettre, mais ils étaient « plutôt inquiétants », a-t-il annoncé quand je l’ai vu. Mon taux de glycémie était de 17, alors qu’il aurait dû être de moins de 5,4. Un examen d’urine confirma une présence de corps cétoniques de 2,2, au lieu d’un taux maximal de 0,6. Je n’avais jamais entendu parler de corps cétoniques jusqu’à ce jour. Quand le médecin m’a dit : « Votre corps s’est mis en mode ‘famine’ », j’ai répondu : « Ah bah pas moi, en tout cas ! », et j’ai ri. Lui non.

– Non, vraiment, vous devez aller à l’hôpital tout de suite pour de plus amples examens.
– Et qu’est-ce qu’on cherche, en fait ?
– Il y a des personnes diabétiques, dans votre famille ?

À partir de ce moment-là, c’est allé très vite. Et c’était un peu irréel. Je devais rentrer chez moi, préparer un sac pour la nuit au cas où on voudrait me garder à l’hôpital, et attendre l’ambulance. Il prononça les mots : « Vous êtes diabétique. » Attendez, vous êtes sûr ? Ça se saurait, si je l’étais non ? Attendez ! Ça se saurait, non ?

Quand l’ambulance est arrivée, un des deux ambulanciers a été très surpris de me voir « si en forme ». J’ai essayé de faire quelques blagues, pour ne pas montrer que je me sentais moi-même mal à l’aise. Je ne lui ai pas dit que la raison pour laquelle je ne conduisais pas, c’était les TOC. J’ai juste dit, comme je le fais toujours, « Excusez-moi, je ne conduis pas ». Il était énervé que quelqu’un ait appelé une ambulance pour loi, alors que j’aurais pu y aller en voiture. Je me suis excusée encore. Il a dit que ça n’était pas de ma faute, mais c’était bien moi qui l’écoutais me dire que je prenais « la place d’un patient malade ». Après ça, on n’a plus vraiment parlé. Surtout après qu’il m’a demandé de préciser les médicaments que je prenais actuellement, pour un formulaire qu’il remplissait sur son Ipad. J’ai dit de la Fluoxétine.

– Et pourquoi vous en prenez-vous ?
– TOC et dépression.

Je ne lui ai pas dit, pour la culpabilité.

À l’hôpital, nous sommes allés de service en service pour voir où je devais aller.

– Vous avez mal au pied?
– Ça ? Oh non, c’est rien, juste un steppage.
– C’est pas pour ça, que vous êtes ici ?
– Non, c’est à cause de mon sang.

On m’a demandé de m’asseoir aux urgences. Un peu plus de deux heures plus tard, une infirmière venait me chercher. J’avais essayé de lire un roman après avoir vu sur une ardoise, au mur : « 4 à 5 heures d’attente le 12/12/19 @ 17h avant de voir un médecin, à partir de votre heure d’arrivée ».

Alors que le sang perlait au bout de mes doigts, les gens votaient pour le futur du Royaume-Uni. Pour le futur de la NHS, le système britannique de Sécurité Sociale. J’avais peur. J’avais peur depuis des semaines. Et maintenant, même ce nouveau diagnostic (j’avais un doute : c’était sûr, du coup ? Est-ce qu’on se demandait encore si j’avais du diabète ou était-ce une affaire déjà réglée ?) ne repoussait pas cette peur-là. Au contraire : assise sur la chaise d’un hôpital public, attentive à ne pas mettre du sang partout, cette peur-là se faisait plus pressante. J’étais là, immigrée européenne au Royaume-Uni, attendant d’être traitée gratuitement par un système médical qui avait, ces dernières années, connu coupe budgétaire après coupe budgétaire.

Mon taux de glycémie avait augmenté. Je comprenais sous un jour nouveau l’expression « se faire du mauvais sang ». Je n’avais plus envie de rire, pourtant, assise sur cette chaise d’une salle bondée. Un demi-heure passa. Ou était-ce une heure ? Quelques minutes après m’avoir reçu dans un nouveau box, je les entendais parler derrière le rideau bleu : « C’est beaucoup trop élevé. Elle doit voir un docteur. » L’infirmière regarda ensuite mon autre bras, y trouva une veine. C’était simplement de l’eau salée, apparemment.

Il était à peu près 22h et on donnait les premières estimations. Parti conservateur 368, parti travailliste 191. J’éteignis l’écran de mon téléphone. Je n’avais même pas envie de commenter ça. L’affaire était réglée. Si c’était du type 1, ça avait même toujours été déjà réglé.

Après trois heures dans la salle, on m’amena à un autre box.

– Donc vous êtes diabétique ?
– Apparemment, oui.
– Vous ne le saviez pas ?
– Vraiment pas, non.
– Pourquoi êtes-vous allée chez votre médecin ?
– Parce que j’ai un steppage. Et je suis très déshydratée. Depuis septembre je dois boire 4 à 5 litres d’eau par jour.
– Pouvez-vous me montrer comment vous marchez ?

Alors j’ai marché.

Les bureaux de vote étaient bel et bien fermés. Il était 1h du matin.

– Au moins je peux vous confirmer que les résultats nous sont parvenus, et vous ne faites pas d’acidocétose diabétique.
– Ah, ça, c’est bien !
– Vous savez ce que c’est ?
– Disons que j’ai lu des trucs sur le site de la NHS en attendant…

On m’amena un lit. Un chariot brancard, en fait. J’avais tellement envie de m’allonger. Les infirmières le voyaient bien, alors que je me tassais de plus en plus sur ma chaise, lasse – je ne parvenais pas à lire, ni mon livre ni mon téléphone. Elles passaient leur temps à s’excuser : « Désolée de vous faire attendre si longtemps, il y a tellement de patient·e·s ce soir. Nous n’avons plus aucun lit de libre. » Comme l’ambulancier, c’était à mon tour de dire : « Vous n’y êtes pour rien. Ne vous inquiétez pas. Vous n’y êtes pour rien. » L’infirmière m’injecta de l’insuline dans le corps pour la toute première fois.

On comptabilisait encore les bulletins de vote à l’heure où je m’allongeais sous la lumière blafarde de la grande salle. Au bout d’une heure, on m’amena deux couvertures. J’en mis une sur ma tête pour qu’il fasse sombre, et l’homme sur le brancard à côté du mien déclara : « Ah ben j’aurais tout vu ! » Plus tard, il me donnerait de l’argent et me demanderait d’aller au café (il ne pouvait pas marcher) pour acheter £70 de gâteaux et de biscuits pour les infirmières. « C’est noël, après tout ! » Les biscuits avaient une forme de sapin et étaient décorés de rouge et d’or. Aux murs pendaient des guirlandes.

Chaque heure et demie, depuis mon arrivée, une infirmière avait vérifié ma température (36,4), ma tension (aucune idée de combien elle était), mon taux de glycémie, et parfois mon taux de corps cétoniques (à présent 3,1). Quand mon taux glycémique atteint 25,8 vers 3h du matin, elle me dit qu’il fallait le reprendre pour être bien sûres de ça. C’était trop élevé, bien trop élevé. La machine affiche 26,4. « Si ça ne s’améliore pas dans l’heure qui vient, on devra vous redonner une piqûre d’insuline. » Je restais vaguement assoupie. Le taux s’améliora (19), et vers 5 heures du matin on m’emmena dans une autre unité, la Medical Assessment Unit. Je voulais marcher pour y aller, mais on me dit: “Non non non, vous restez allongée là.” J’écoutais les infirmières discuter alors que se déroulait le plafond, et bien sûr je ne comprenais pas de qui elles parlaient, mais quelqu’un avait perdu son bébé. Le chagrin vint s’asseoir sur ma poitrine.

Le nouvel endroit où on m’amenait était bien plus confortable : il y avait un vrai lit, et la lumière était tamisée. Je passai la chemise de nuit qu’on m’avait donnée, et essayai de dormir.

À partir de 7h, je passais la journée à rencontrer le personnel médical. On m’apprit des choses sur le diabète. D’abord, un expert vint m’expliquer ce que c’était, me rappela le rôle du pancréas, m’expliqua pourquoi ils pensaient là-bas, comme mon généraliste, que j’étais de type 1. Puis une doctoresse vint m’expliquer comment utiliser un flexpen pour l’insuline, et la machine qu’on me donnerait pour contrôler mon taux de glucose. On me donna des aiguilles pour les piqûres, pour les prélèvements du sang. Une boîte jaune sécurisée pour les jeter. Une autre experte vint me donner une grosse pile de dépliants. Sur l’un deux, on lisait « Diabète et bien-être psychologique ». Il y avait aussi une sorte de magazine : « Le diabète de type 1 au quotidien ».

– Alors, c’est un peu un choc pour vous, non ?
– Oui, un peu.
– Comment vous vivez cette annonce ?
– Je la vis bien, merci.
– Mmh. Vous êtes sûre ?
– Oui oui.
– Ça va aller, vous aller voir.
– Oh, je sais bien.
– Ne vous inquiétez pas.

Entre les discussions et les contrôles sanguins, je consultais mes comptes Facebook et Twitter. Le peuple britannique s’était prononcé, et tout comme la plupart de mes ami·e·s, j’étais tout sauf heureuse de ce qu’il avait dit. Je n’étais pas seule. Q. avait dit qu’il viendrait tout de suite après le boulot si j’avais besoin.

Immigrante récemment diagnostiquée diabétique dans un hôpital britannique, je pus enfin aller fumer une cigarette dehors, la première en 14 heures. Sur mon chemin, je croisai cette plaque :

En commémoration du 40e anniversaire de la
NHS
et
de l’inauguration officielle de
l’hôpital de Derriford
le 22 août 1099
par la Première Ministre
la très honorable
Margaret Thatcher, FRS MP (Membre de la Société Royale)

En parlant de dates importantes, nous étions maintenant vendredi 13.

Top

Political Dilemmas: OCD Generates Tormented Activists

french flag pastel

As it is the case for many sufferers, OCD is for me very much about guilt. I’ve already talked about this issue, see here for instance.

If I don’t … [please fill in the blanks with seemingly insignificant action], something bad will happen. And if something bad happens, it’s necessarily because I omitted to… [please fill in the blanks with seemingly insignificant action]


My brain even tries to trick me into believing this is rational thinking. If I had checked that light switch 4 times before living the house, I would have left just a bit later, therefore I would have crossed the street maybe 20 seconds later, therefore the whole traffic would have been different, and that car which arrived 1 minute later wouldn’t have been there, therefore it couldn’t have had an accident two hours later because the turn of events would have been radically different.

In other words, If I had checked a light switch 4 times before living the house, the car of a complete stranger, that I don’t know and will never know, wouldn’t have had an accident two hours after passing by me while I was walking in the street.


I don’t deal very well with guilt.

Probably because I’m not afraid to face the notion of responsibility.

I’m responsible for every word I say, every action I make. I don’t easily hide behind circumstances or so-called urges. ‘I couldn’t not say it’, etc. Of course I could not have said it. I just didn’t want to not say it. I don’t shy away from responsibility.

I’m at one end of the spectrum. Some people will never admit that they did what they did. As for me, I’ll admit to have done things I haven’t done, if you say so. And oh, the self-shaming when being harassed or verbally abused… Dealing with guilt and responsibility is not a private issue. It’s political.

Speaking about politics, there’s one area where guilt is particularly tricky.

Because I don’t shy away from the notion of responsibility, I want my behaviour, my thoughts and my speech to be entirely responsible. I mean, fair. I mean, kind. I mean, I’d like to be good people.

So I’ve been interested in all things political from a very early age. I found it crucial to know what I wanted to be defending, and what I wanted to be fighting against. This has little to do with political parties. I’ve always been a lot more involved in daily politics. The way I act on a daily basis. What would be a good thing to do, everyday? What is a responsible action?

However, politics really is a tricky place to feel guilty. Because I resent being unable to fight for absolutely everything I want to fight for. Not on a world-wide basis, but even in my own life. Living an ethical life, helping people, and at the same time standing for ideals I believe in.

That’s the problem with politics. When you’re supporting one thing, many think the rest doesn’t matter to you at all, or that you’re wrong on everything else.

You can witness this at any point in history, but also throughout your own life. Every time you stand up for something, there’ll be someone thinking you’re an asshole. Or at the very least, someone telling you you’re forgetting so many other victims. You’re not being compassionate enough for all the other sides – plural, not singular. I refuse the traditional dichotomy, it’s never the case. There are so many other perspectives.

Anyway. For most people, standing up for something means rejecting everything else.

The sad thing is, part of this is true. When you’re defending one thing, you’re not defending everything at once. Just the one. There may even be contradictions in the very action of standing up for that cause – conflicting principles from your own perspective, perhaps. Because no ‘side’, out of all of these possibilities, will ever represent the complexity of human thinking. Politics is about slogans, is about rhetoric, is about how many characters you can type in a paper article without boring your reader. You have to keep it short. You have to keep it incomplete.

Politics loves short answers and easy-to-explain ideas. It has to be done immediately, and people will react straightaway, all in a very big apology of the far-too-short.

Ideals take time.
They make us good people. They make us assholes, too. Let’s not forget that.


I don’t mean that we shouldn’t have ideals; I’m saying that if you ever want to be involved in any sort of ideological or political debate, you’ll have to accept being an asshole.

Actually, it’s not just about politics.

Look. I try to be ethical.
I live in England. For great friends, I’d be willing to take a flight any time to support them, should they need/want it. Some would think it makes me a friend you can trust. Some would think I’m just being selfishly unethical. Because I accept all consequences of modern comfort for a weekend of friendship, rather than protect the earth from carbon emissions for generations to come. I want to be ethical. Yet it’s true, I’m not. My role in pollution is no secret to me. It’s not even that I don’t know it. I do know it. So of course, for these people, I’m a privileged asshole.

See how OCD can make me literally hate myself for making decisions? I can’t be all good. I can’t.

In every decision you make, there are bad sides (again, plural…) to it. That’s why it’s called making a decision: it’s something to act upon. It’s an action. Therefore it has consequences.

Politics? An OCD nightmare. Because you’ll never be good enough.

If you talk about one issue in particular, people will say you don’t care about other issues.
If you talk about many issues, people will say that you’re all talk and therefore useless, that you need to pick and choose in order to be productive and helpful.

If you defend someone, people will say you’re patronising, because you’re depriving this person of their own story: why are you talking for them? Let them talk!
But if you don’t try to defend them, people will say: you don’t even care what others have to experience! You’re so focused on your individual, meaningless perspective!

If you travel to discover other cultures, people will say you’re exploiting your economic superiority in a postcolonial context…
But if you don’t travel, people will say that you’re narrow-minded, because you’ve never left your own house.

No you’ll never be good enough. There’s no political group that will ever accept you for everything that you are. And yet if you feel like talking about politics, it is, in some ways, to feel that you’re not alone.

The very thing that could make you a group also divides you. And if you’re anything like me, you’ll suffer a lot from this divide. Because there are divisions that you’ve chosen, that you assume entirely, and others that are just imposed on you.



I’m going to take an example: the way we treat animals. Cause I know many animal-lovers. The problem is that they can’t even stand each other.

Some are animal-lovers and own pets. They think they treat their animals right, and therefore offer them an enjoyable life in a welcoming and loving family. Some of these pets have even been rescued. It’s true that without these people, these animals would have been killed.

Some are meat-eaters. But when they see anyone wasting the slightest piece of meat, they go crazy: ‘a living being has been killed for that, so you’re certainly not throwing it away!’ They don’t buy more than they need, and they avoid supermarkets which manage to produce chicken for under £1 the 6 wings.

Some are vegetarians. They don’t eat the flesh of any animals, because they don’t want to be involved in the killing of innocent peaceful beings. They may think that you can’t really say you’re an animal-lover if you eat animals.

Some are vegans. They don’t eat animal flesh, but also refuse any kind of animal exploitation. They don’t drink milk because it means that a cow or goat is being enslaved for life in order to produce a substance that’s only necessary for their own babies anyway.

So who respects animals there? Vegans could think vegetarians have it easy. They’re not protecting animals from exploitation if they still enjoy the great taste of cheese, are they? But vegetarians could say that at least, they’re not meat-eaters. But some meat-eaters could say yes, but I’m against any kind of waste, whereas others are not, and that’s what makes meat-eating a bad thing. Look: they still buy products from such and such unethical shops, whereas I avoid all supermarkets. And they could say: isn’t it worse to have a pet, therefore to think that an animal can be your property for life? At least once an animal has been killed for providing food, it doesn’t have to obey some master for years. The animal-owners who have pet could be very upset by such speech. How can they think owning animals as pets is a bad thing? They protect them, they provide them with everything they need: shelter, food, and love.

It’s complicated. Some meat-eaters volunteer in charities helping animals to have a better life. Some don’t. Because some don’t give a damn about the way animal are treated. But some do. Some meat-eaters try to support human-related causes instead, because they think human beings are the priority. Others will think what matters is the environment. Other thinks that being specist (= thinking that humans are superior to animals in any sort of way) is the very foundation of our bloody society.

I could tell you here what my personal opinion is on the matter… For now, though, I’ll just tell you that this issue in particular has been complicated for me. What action must I take? Some will always consider me an asshole. The question is: what asshole do I want to be?


I’m not who I was two years, or even two months ago. I experience something, and learn from it. I try to make things right, but I know, at the same time, that I’ll always be an asshole from someone’s perspective. Because I’m not good enough, because I’ve been ‘manipulated’, because I’m going to this protest, or because I’m not going, or because I don’t wear the right clothes, or because I should be naked or because I should wear more layers.

I’m not saying: then, let’s do nothing, it would be easier! No. Life’s complicated, and it’s supposed to be. I won’t refuse the complicated part of life, because that would mean refusing life altogether.

That’s why I’ve been thinking, recently, that being political is just like recovering from OCD: you’ll always know that something isn’t quite right. Because it can’t be right for everyone. Some will disagree. So you must accept the reasonable part of guilt and responsibility. The side of you telling you you’re an asshole for trying to make things right, you can say what I say to my four-time-switch-lighting side: well, I can always be held responsible for my decisions. But I’m not responsible for what other people want to think, or do.

Political dilemmas really is the OCD of the masses. I knew we all had something in common.


Dilemmes politiques: les TOC donnent des militants tourmentés

Comme c’est le cas pour beaucoup de gens qui en souffrent, mes TOC sont intimement liés à la responsabilité. J’ai déjà parlé de cette notion, voyez ici par exemple.

Si je ne fais pas … [remplacez les points de suspensions par une action en apparence insignifiante], quelque chose de terrible va arriver. Et si quelque chose de terrible arrive, c’est nécessairement parce que j’ai omis de… [remplacez les points de suspensions par une action en apparence insignifiante]

Mon cerveau essaie même de me faire croire que tout ça, c’est rationnel. Si j’avais vérifié l’interrupteur 4 fois avant de quitter la maison, je serais partie juste un peu plus tard, donc j’aurais traversé la rue peut-être 20 secondes après, et donc tout le traffic aurait été différent, et cette voiture qui est arrivé une minute plus tard ne se serait pas trouvée là, et donc elle n’aurait pas pu avoir d’accident deux heures plus tard parce que la tournure même des événements aurait connu un enchaînement radicalement différent.

En d’autres termes, si j’avais vérifié un interrupteur 4 fois avant de quitter la maison, la voiture d’un parfait inconnu, que je ne connais pas ni ne connaîtrait jamais, n’aurait jamais eu d’accident deux heures après m’avoir dépassée quand je marchais dans la rue.

La culpabilité, c’est un peu dur à gérer pour moi.

Sûrement parce qu’en fait, je n’ai pas peur de faire face à la notion de responsabilité.

Je suis responsable de chaque mot que je prononce, de chaque action que j’entreprends. Je ne me cache pas, de manière facile, derrières les circonstances or les soi-disant envies incontrôlables. « Je ne pouvais pas ne pas le dire », et tout ça. Bien sûr que j’aurais pu ne pas le dire. J’ai juste pas eu envie de ne pas le dire. Je ne fuis pas la responsabilité, elle ne m’effraie pas.

Je suis à l’un des extrêmes de l’éventail de réactions. Certains n’admettront jamais qu’ils ont fait ce qu’ils ont fait. Quant à moi, j’admettrai avoir fait des choses que je n’ai pas faites, si vous le dites. Et oh, cette auto-accusation, cette auto-culpabilisation quand on est harcelée ou agressée verbalement… Gérer la culpabilité et la responsabilité ne relève pas du domaine privé. C’est une question politique.

En parlant de politique, il y a un domaine dans lequel la culpabilité est un problème particulièrement épineux.

Parce que je ne fuis pas la notion de responsabilité, je veux que mon comportement, mes pensées et mes actions soient entièrement responsables. Je veux dire : justes. Je veux dire : bienveillantes. Je veux dire que j’aimerais être quelque de bien, quoi.

C’est pourquoi j’ai très jeune été intéressée par tout ce qui était politique. Je trouvais absolument capital de savoir ce que je voulais défendre, ce contre quoi je désirais me battre. Ça avait très peu à voir avec les partis politiques. Je me suis toujours sentie bien plus concernée par la politique quotidienne. La manière dont je me comportais chaque jour. Ça pourrait être quoi, une bonne chose à faire, tous les jours ? Qu’est-ce qu’une action responsable ?

Cependant, le domaine politique est une domaine où il ne fait pas bon se sentir coupable. Parce que cela me déplaît énormément de ne pas pouvoir me battre pour absolument tout ce pourquoi j’aimerais me battre. Mener une existence éthique, aider les gens, et en même temps représenter les idéaux en lesquels je crois.

C’est le problème avec la politique. Quand tu soutiens une chose, beaucoup pensent que tu te fous de tout le reste, ou que tu as tort sur tout le reste.

Vous pouvez vérifier ça à n’importe quel moment de l’histoire, mais aussi au cours de votre vie. Chaque fois que vous représentez quelque chose, il y aura quelqu’un pour pensez que vous êtes un connard. Ou tout du moins, quelqu’un qui vous dira que vous oubliez toutes les autres victimes. Vous n’avez pas suffisamment de compassion pour les autres côtés – au pluriel, pas au singulier. Je refuse la dichotomie traditionnelle, ça n’est jamais le cas. Il y a toujours une multitude d’autres perpectives.

Bref. Pour la plupart des gens, représenter une chose, ça veut dire rejeter tout le reste.

Ce qui est triste, c’est que c’est en partie vrai. Quand on défend une chose, on n’est pas en train de tout défendre à la fois. On ne défend qu’une chose. Il est même possible qu’il y ait des contradictions dans le fait même de soutenir une cause – des principes contradictoires de votre propre point de vue, peut-être. Parce qu’aucun « côté », parmi toutes ces possibilités qui s’offrent à vous, ne représentera jamais la complexité de la pensée humaine. La politique, c’est une affaire de slogans, de rhétorique, c’est une question de savoir combien de caractères vous pouvez taper dans votre article sans fatiguer votre lectorat. Vous devez faire court. Vous devez faire incomplet.

La politique aime les réponses courtes et les idées faciles à expliquer. Ça doit être fait de suite, et les gens réagiront au quart de tour, tous faisant ainsi l’apologie du beaucoup-trop-court.

Les idéaux prennent du temps.
Ils nous rendent meilleurs. Mais ils font aussi de nous des connards, n’oublions pas ça.

Je ne dis pas que nous devrions ne pas avoir d’idéaux. Je veux dire que si l’on souhaite s’impliquer dans un quelconque débat idéologique ou politique, on doit accepter d’être un connard.

Mais ça n’est pas juste politique.

Regardez. J’essaie d’être une personne éthique.

J’habite en Angleterre. Pour mes amis proches, je serais prête à prendre un avion à n’importe quel moment pour les soutenir, s’ils avaient besoin de moi, ou envie de me voir. Certains penseront que ça fait de moi une amie de confiance. Certains penseront que je suis juste une égoïste non-éthique. Parce que j’accepte toutes les conséquences du confort moderne pour un week-end d’amitié, plutôt que de protéger le globe des émissions carbones pour des générations à venir. Je veux être éthique. C’est vrai, je ne le suis pas. Mon role en tant que pollueuse n’est pas un grand secret. Ce n’est même pas que je l’ignore. Je le sais. Alors bien sûr, pour ces gens-là, je suis juste une connasse de privilégiée.

Voyez comment les TOC m’amènent à me haïr simplement de prendre des décisions. Je ne peux pas tout faire bien. Je ne peux pas.

Dans toutes les décisions que l’on prend, il y a de mauvais côtés (encore une fois, c’est un pluriel). C’est pourquoi ça s’appelle prendre une décision : c’est une action, on a quelque chose à y faire. Ça a des conséquences.

La politique? Un cauchemar plein de TOC. Parce qu’on ne sera jamais assez bien.

Si on parle d’un problème en particulier, les gens diront qu’on se fout des autres problèmes.
Si on parle de plusieurs problèmes à la fois, les gens diront qu’on ne fait que parler, et donc qu’on est inutile, qu’il faudrait choisir une seule chose et se focaliser dessus pour servir à quelque chose.

Si vous défendez quelqu’un, les gens diront que vous êtes condescendants, parce que vous privez cette personne de sa propre histoire : pourquoi parlez-vous en son nom ? Laissez-la parler !
Mais si vous n’essayez pas de defendre cette personne ou ces gens, on dira : tu te fous de ce à quoi d’autres sont confrontés ! T’es tellement préoccupé par ton propre nombril, tu ne vois que ça !

Si vous voyagez pour découvrir d’autres cultures, les gens diront que vous exploitez votre supériorité économique dans un contexte post-colonial…
Mais si vous ne voyagez pas, les gens diront que vous êtes étroits d’esprit, puisque vous n’êtes jamais sortis de chez vous.

Non, vous ne serez jamais assez bien, en effet. Il n’y aura jamais aucun groupe politique qui vous acceptera entièrement pour ce que vous êtes. Et pourtant si vous avez l’envie même de parler politique, c’est, d’une manière ou d’une autre, pour vous sentir moins seul.

La chose même qui pourrait vous unir vous divise. Et si vous êtes un minimum comme moi, vous souffrirez beaucoup de cette division. Car il y a des divisions que vous avez choisies et que vous assumez. D’autres que vous ne faites que subir.

Je vais prendre un exemple: la manière dont nous traitons les animaux. Parce que je connais plein de gens qui aiment les animaux. Le problème, c’est qu’ils ne peuvent pas se voir entre eux.

Certains aiment les animaux et ont des animaux domestiques. Ils pensent qu’ils traitent bien leurs animaux, et donc qu’ils leur offrent une belle existence dans une famille accueillante et aimante. Certains de ces animaux sont mêmes des rescapés de refuges. Il est vrai que sans ces gens, ces animaux auraient été tués.

Certains mangent de la viande. Mais quand ils voient une personne quelconque gaspiller le moindre morceau de viande, ils deviennent verts de rage : « un être vivant a été tué pour ça, alors il n’est pas question qu’il finisse à la poubelle ! » Ils n’achètent pas plus que ce dont ils ont besoin, ils évitent les supermarchés qui parviennent à produire 6 ailes de poulet pour mois d’un euro.

Certains sont végétariens. Ils ne mangent la chair d’aucun animal, parce qu’ils ne veulent pas participer au massacre d’animaux innocents et paisibles. Il arrive qu’ils pensent qu’on ne peut pas vraiment dire qu’on aime les animaux si on les mange.

Certains sont végétaliens. Ils ne mangent aucune chair animale, mais ils refusent également toute exploitation animale. Ils ne boivent pas de lait parce que cela signifie qu’une vache ou une chèvre est réduite à une vie d’esclavage afin de produire une substance qui de toute façon n’est de toute façon nécessaire qu’à ses propres enfants.

Alors qui, ici, respecte les animaux ? Les végétaliens pourraient penser que les végétariens se la coulent douce. Ils ne sont pas vraiment contre l’exploitation animale, hein, s’ils continuent de profiter du bon goût du fromage ? Mais les végétariens pourraient dire qu’eux, au moins, ne mangent pas de viande. Mais ceux qui en mangent pourraient dire oui, mais regarde, je m’oppose au gaspillage, alors que d’autres non, et c’est ça qui fait que manger de la viande est un problème ! Regarde : ils achètent leur nourriture dans des magasins pas du tout éthiques, alors que j’évite tous les supermarchés. Ils pourraient ajouter : est-ce que ça n’est pas pire d’avoir des animaux, et donc de penser qu’il est légitime qu’un animal t’appartienne pour toute sa vie ? Au moins une fois qu’on a mangé l’animal, il n’a pas à obéir à un maître pendant des années. Ce discours peinerait beaucoup ceux qui ont des animaux. Comment peut-on penser qu’avoir des animaux est une mauvaise chose ? Ils les protègent, et leur donnent tout ce dont ils ont besoin : un abri, de la nourriture, de l’amour.

C’est compliqué. Certains mangent des animaux mais sont bénévoles dans des associations de lutte pour la protection animale, pour que les animaux aient des vies meilleures. Certains se foutent complètement de la manière dont on traite les animaux. Certains mangent des animaux et soutiennent des causes humaines, car ils pensent que là est la priorité. D’autres pensent que c’est l’environnement, la priorité. D’autres encore pensent qu’être spéciste (c’est-à-dire penser que l’espèce humaine est supérieure aux espèces animales de quelque manière que ce soit) est au fondement même de notre société sanglante.

Je pourrais vous donner mon point de vue personnel sur le sujet. Pour l’instant, cependant, je dirai juste que cette question a toujours été bien compliquée pour moi. Comment agir ? Il y en aura toujours pour penser que je suis une connasse. La question, c’est : quelle connasse je veux être ?

Je ne suis pas qui j’étais il y a deux ans, ou même deux mois. Je vis quelque chose, et j’apprends de ça. J’essaie de corriger le tir, de faire les choses correctement, mais je sais que dans le même temps, je reste la connasse pour quelqu’un. Parce que je suis pas assez bien, parce que j’ai été « manipulée », parce que je vais à cette manif, ou parce que je n’y vais pas, ou parce que je ne porte pas les bons vêtements, ou que je devrais me mettre à poil ou parce que je devrais empiler plusieurs couches au contraire.


Je ne dis pas : alors ne faisons rien, c’est tellement plus facile ! Non. La vie est compliquée, et c’est ainsi qu’elle sera toujours. Je ne refuserai pas ce qui la rend compliquée, ce serait la refuser tout court.

C’est pourquoi ces derniers temps, je me suis dit qu’avoir des opinions politiques, c’était comme de lutter contre des TOC : vous saurez toujours que quelque chose n’est pas exactement comme il faudrait. Parce que ça ne peut pas être « comme il faut » du point de vue de tout le monde. Certains seront en désaccord. On doit alors accepter la part raisonnable de culpabilité et de responsabilité. Et la partie de vous qui vous dit que vous êtes un connard pour essayer de faire les choses correctement, vous pouvez lui dire ce que je dis à mon côté je-vérifie-quatre-fois-la-lumière : ouais, j’assume toutes mes décisions. Mais je ne suis pas responsable de ce que les autres veulent penser ou faire.


Les dilemmes politiques sont vraiment les TOC des masses que nous sommes. Je savais bien qu’on avait tous quelque chose en commun.

Top