God Knows I’ve Tried: What Religion and OCD Have in Common

french flag pastel

We all know how difficult it is to talk about religion, both for/to religious and non religious people. Especially when, from the very title of your post, you state that religion and OCD have something in common… I mean, come on, you’re comparing a serious, debilitating mental illness with religion? Are you just trying to be hurtful?

Let’s get this straight: of course I don’t. As a matter of fact, having had a religious education myself (I attended catechism for many years), I identify as a Christian, as a catholic. I respect all faiths as long as they don’t serve as excuses to commit violence or murder. So, yeah, so long as you’re not an asshole, frankly, believe whatever you like.

But here’s the first thing OCD and religion have in common: be honest, in the vast majority of cases, you don’t really choose it… You just end up one day realising that even if you’d like to think otherwise, something is now wired in a certain way in your brain and it’s extremely hard, virtually impossible, to completely distance yourself from it. Here, I can’t talk in great details about many religions. So let me talk about my own: Catholicism.

A bit like OCD, Catholicism finds its greatest strength in guilt. Now, I’m not writing a theological essay so please understand that this is not a condemnation of that faith (nor of any faith, for that matter, please see above). However, if there exists in this world a Catholic that has absolutely no relation no guilt, I’d love to meet them. Catholicism is founded on human guilt: the prophet died for our sins – and man, what a horrible way to die… During our whole life, we have to ask for forgiveness, even if frankly, there’s not much we’ve been able to do yet. Confession is expected, required even, even from children. Every time something bad happens in your life, you are reminded that it’s because we humans have sinned, and must forever pay for these sins. And what sins… It’s no small issues, we killed the Christ, for God’s sake (sorry). So anyway: GUILT. Especially as a woman: our whole body is sin, sex is sin, being sexually active is sin yet not giving birth is sin (err… wait…), we are impure, and sadly, this belief is the one sexist connection we find in most religions. So as a random Catholic, I was taught to live with that guilt. And what do we do to absolve us from that guilt? We perform rituals: we pray, we meditate, we attend mass, we impose punishment on ourselves, etc.

Then came the OCD. Although the details are quite different, I know that the thought pattern is pretty similar: I’m afraid I’m responsible for something terrible, hurting people around me, people I love. What do I do? I perform rituals: checking the light/cooker/tap a given number of times, for instance, or I impose punishment on me: not going out, not going to bed, not seeing friends.

Let’s see the scary resemblance between those two scenarii:

Lily had terrifying thoughts: she was responsible for the death of Christ. Feeling ashamed and guilty, she experienced distress, cried, and kept repeating the same prayer 10 times, as the priest had asked of her during confession. Sadly, the following day, the same scene happened again, and she didn’t feel any less guilty. So she started the ritual all over again, hoping it would bring her some relief.


Lily had terrifying thoughts: she would be responsible for the death of her neighbours is her house was set on fire. Feeling ashamed and guilty, she experienced distress, cried, and kept checking the cooker over and over until she achieved a more or less satisfying number, as her brain was telling her what felt right. Sadly, the following day, the same scene happened again, and she didn’t feel any less guilty. So she started the ritual all over again, hoping it would bring her some relief.



There’s another way religion and OCD are connected: ‘Religious and moral obsessions are some of the earliest reported forms of OCD. Many famous religious figures in history have had disturbing intrusive thoughts and doubts about their faith; Martin Luther and John Bunyan are amongst the more famous.’ (Break Free from OCD: Overcoming Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with CBT, by Dr Fiona Challacombe, Dr Victoria Bream Oldfield and Professor Paul Salkovskis – see the page Liberating Works for a full reference). From now on, I will also add “moral”, then, because religion doesn’t necessarily give you morality (sadly I hear that some are convinced that without a religion, you may be nothing but immoral… Let it be said that this is absolutely not my opinion: I know many strongly committed atheists who have a far better morality than most religious people we see bragging and lecturing everyone in the media… Anyway…)

So yes, historically, OCD first appeared as a religion- or moral- associated problem. It’s no coincidence of course. You’ll hear many people say that their intrusive thoughts are related to something they find disgusting or atrociously immoral: killing people, molesting children, … And in that case, what else do they have, but the pattern of organised religion to follow: rituals keep the mind occupied, help us feel better about ourselves (or so we think…), help us be better human beings (well, so most think…).

Something that’s just random to a non-believer can also be immensely distressing to a believer. For instance, obscene thoughts. Most people do understand that having sexual images coming to your mind is absolutely normal, even in the most non-sexual places: at work, while giving a class, while cooking a stew, while talking to your family… And they will pay no particular attention to them. Now if someone has told you all your life that having this kind of images not only was a terrible thing, but was your fault (= evidence that you’re a disgusting sex addict, and actually enjoy it), of course you’d be distressed. And you’d like to do anything that could potentially save you, and most importantly: save others from you. The history of OCD is full of people who isolated themselves because they feared they would perform terrible things on people, because they had extremely distressing unwanted images coming up to their brain. And of course, the more you try to avoid them, the longer they’ll stay, the more graphic they’ll become. It’s the naked fornicating elephant in the room.

I’m in no way saying that religion gives you OCD: there are many religious people in the world, and many of them live with no known mental health illness. Religion is not necessarily a trigger either. Moreover, many atheists live with OCD. But religion, moral, and OCD are strongly connected nonetheless. And OCD related to religion is actually a specific category of that illness. Some people have OCD which is only associated with their faith: it only triggers when they pray, think of God, etc. For instance in the middle of a prayer they will think of something obscene, and fear they are terrible people for that. Or they will think of God in the least appropriate moment, for instance, while having sex or masturbating. I remember that as a teen, I was constantly scared of not “shutting down” my bedtime prayer properly: I had to say “Amen” the correct amount of times, or it would mean that God would still be listening as I started fantasizing about that handsome friend with whom I was so hoping to make out… One day, I remember reading a similar fear depicted in the book series Titeuf by Zep, and I felt so grateful I wasn’t the only one. As well as so sad it wasn’t something we talked about to reassure us all.

Yes, we need to talk about guilt and religion. And the more I hear about it, the more I’m convinced. There’s this episode of Louie for instance, which shows which cruel (yet quite realistic, if you ask me) thought patterns we impose on young kids to make them feel guilty forever, in the name of Catholicism: because of them, Jesus died, because of them, life will forever be a living hell, and pain, loss and grief are all due to that terrible sin we have committed in the first place, of being so cruel and arrogant. For fuck sake, in the documentary Jesus Camp, you see children – children!!! Being sadistically pushed to cry for what they – they!!! do to aborted foetus… (Reminder: they can’t even procreate yet).

There is no way you can be a Catholic and deny that our religion is based on imposing guilt and shame from an early age to any human being we can convince… And yes, even if it does not always include physical violence (but let’s not forget that in many cases the world over, it sadly does), it is an incredibly violent process.

Don’t try and convince me that it’s for the greater good. Of course religion can also bring you empathy, and love, and a meaning to your existence. But that’s not my point here.

Finally, I’d like to say this: like OCD, religion is extremely hard to recover from. Yes, even if I’m a Christian myself, I dare say “recover”. Because when all you want is to be an atheist and people keep pushing you to believe even more, it really can be considered a trauma. I know some people who, having had a religious education, are now convinced atheists. But I also know that dark truth they obviously hate to talk about: they could never really shake all that guilt away. Still from time to time, it would come back to them as intrusive thoughts: “sex is bad”, “homosexuality is against nature”, “greed is a sin” “envy is terrible, I’m a horrible person”. Even if they brush off these ideas when they come up, they still have to face it one more time. Something that people raised in atheist households, frankly, don’t even think about. Their lives might not be perfect either, but on that front, they start in life with less guilt. And, I don’t know… I’d like us to be able to talk about this.


Dieu sait que j’ai essayé: ce que la religion et les TOC ont en commun

Nous savons tous à quel point il est difficile de parler de religion, pour les croyants comme pour les non-croyants. Surtout quand on commence un post avec un titre affirmant que la religion et les TOC ont quelque chose en commun… Sérieusement, comparer un trouble psychologique grave et handicapant à la religion ? C’est quoi ton délire, tu veux juste blesser les gens ?

Disons-le donc très clairement : évidemment que ce n’est pas mon intention. D’ailleurs, ayant reçu moi-même une éducation religieuse (je suis longtemps allée au catéchisme), je me considère chrétienne, catholique. Je respecte la foi quelle qu’elle soit, à partir du moment où elle ne sert pas d’excuse pour commettre violence et assassinats. Donc tant que vous n’êtes pas un enfoiré, franchement, vous croyez bien ce que vous voulez.

Mais voici la première chose que les TOC et la religion ont en commun: soyons honnêtes, dans la majorité des cas, on ne choisit pas vraiment d’en avoir… On se rend juste compte un jour que même si on voulait tellement penser autrement, quelque chose s’est mis en place dans notre cerveau faisant qu’il est extrêmement difficile, voire impossible, de changer notre manière de penser. Ici, je ne peux pas parler avec force détails de plusieurs religions. Alors je me concentrerai sur la mienne : le catholicisme…

Un peu comme les TOC, le catholicisme trouve sa plus grande force dans la culpabilité. Je ne suis pas en train d’écrire un essai théologique, donc je vous en prie, comprenez que je n’exprime pas là une simple condamnation de cette foi (ni d’aucune autre foi, d’ailleurs, voir ci-dessus). Cependant, s’il existe sur Terre un seul catholique qui n’a absolument aucun lien à la culpabilité, j’aimerais énormément le rencontrer. Le catholicisme est fondé sur la culpabilité humaine : le prophète est mort pour nos péchés – et pas de la manière la plus sympa qui soit… Notre vie durant, nous devons demander pardon, même quand franchement, il n’y a pas encore grand-chose qu’on ait pu faire. La confession est encouragée, exigée même, y compris pour les enfants. Chaque fois que quelque chose de terrible se passe dans notre vie, on nous rappelle que c’est parce que les humains ont péché, et devront payer pour ces péchés toute leur vie. Et ces péchés, c’est pas de la gnognotte, on a quand même tué le Christ, pour l’amour du ciel (pardon). Donc bref : LA CULPABILITÉ. Et particulièrement si l’on est une femme : notre corps n’est que péché, le sexe est péché, avoir une vie sexuelle est péché mais ne pas donner naissance à des enfants est péché (euh… attends deux secondes…), nous sommes si impures, et malheureusement, cette croyance, c’est le lien sexiste qui rassemble la plupart des religions. Ainsi, en tant que catholique lambda, on m’a appris à vivre dans la culpabilité. Et que fait-on, pour s’absoudre de cette culpabilité ? On met en place des rituels : on prie, on médite, on se rend à la messe, on se punit soi-même, etc.

Vinrent alors les TOC. Bien que dans le détail, ce soit différent, je sais que le raisonnement est relativement similaire : j’ai peur d’être responsable de quelque chose de terrible, de faire du mal aux gens que j’aime autour de moi. Alors qu’est-ce que je fais ? Je mets en place des rituels : vérifier la lumière/le gaz/les robinets un certain nombre de fois, par exemple, ou alors je m’impose une punition : ne pas sortir, ne pas aller me coucher, ne pas voir mes amis.

Penchons-nous donc sur cette effrayante ressemblance entre deux scénarios :

Lily avaient des pensées terrifiantes : elle était responsable de la mort du Christ. Honteuse et coupable, elle se sentait bouleversée, pleurait, et répétait 10 fois la même prière, comme le prêtre lui avait demandé de le faire au confessionnal. Malheureusement, le lendemain, la même scène arrivait à nouveau, et elle ne sentait nullement moins coupable. Et donc elle recommençait le rituel, espérant que cela la soulagerait un peu.

Lily avaient des pensées terrifiantes : elle serait responsable de la mort de ses voisins si la maison prenait feu. Honteuse et coupable, elle se sentait bouleversée, pleurait, et vérifiait encore et encore la cuisinière jusqu’à atteindre un nombre de fois qui la satisfasse plus ou moins, comme son cerveau le lui indiquait. Malheureusement, le lendemain, la même scène arrivait à nouveau, et elle ne sentait nullement moins coupable. Et donc elle recommençait le rituel, espérant que cela la soulagerait un peu.

Il y a un autre lien unissant la religion et les TOC: « Les obsessions morales et religieuses sont parmi les premières formes de TOC historiquement rapportées. De nombreuses figures historiques ont connu des pensées intrusives qui les faisaient douter de leur foi : Martin Luther et John Bunyan comptent parmi les plus connus. (Ma traduction – Break Free from OCD: Overcoming Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with CBT, by Dr Fiona Challacombe, Dr Victoria Bream Oldfield and Professor Paul Salkovskis – voir la page Liberating Works pour la référence complète en anglais). À partir de maintenant, je veux donc ajouter cette “moralité”, parce que la religion ne confère pas nécessairement au croyant une quelconque moralité (j’entends ici et là que certains sont convaincus que sans religion, nous serions immoraux… Permettez-moi de l’affirmer ici : ça n’est absolument pas mon opinion : je connais beaucoup d’athées absolument convaincus qui ont une moralité bien supérieure à celle des croyants qu’on entend se vanter et faire des leçons à tout le monde dans les médias… bref…)
Ainsi, oui, historiquement, les TOC sont d’abord apparus sous la forme d’un problème lié à la religion ou à la moralité. Ça n’est évidemment pas un hasard. Beaucoup de gens disent que leurs pensées intrusives sont liées à quelque chose qui les dégoûte, ou qu’ils trouvent atrocement immorale : tuer des gens, abuser des enfants sexuellement, … Et dans ce cas, qu’ont-ils d’autre que ce schéma qu’ils connaissent bien, imposé qu’il est par une pratique religieuse : les rituels permettent d’occuper l’esprit, nous aident à nous sentir mieux (en tout cas c’est ce qu’on croit) et à devenir meilleurs (disons que beaucoup de gens le croient, en tout cas…)

Quelque chose qui peut paraître complètement insignifiant pour un non-croyant peut être bouleversant pour un croyant. Par exemple les pensées obscènes. La plupart des gens comprennent qu’avoir des pensées à caractère sexuel de manière involontaire est absolument normal, même dans des lieux tout-à-fait non sexuels : au travail, quand on donne un cours, pendant qu’on prépare un pot-au-feu, pendant qu’on parle à sa famille… et ainsi ils ne leur donneront aucune espèce d’importance. Cependant, si on vous a répété toute votre vie qu’avoir ce genre d’images incontrôlées dans la tête était une chose terrible, et que c’était de votre faute (= une preuve que vous êtes un obsédé dégueulasse, qui en plus s’y complaît), bien sûr que ça bouleverse. Et on aimerait alors faire n’importe quoi qui pourrait nous sauver, et de manière encore plus importante, sauver les autres de nous-mêmes. L’histoire des TOC est emplie de gens qui se sont eux-mêmes isolés parce qu’ils avaient peur de commettre des actes atroces sur des gens, parce que des images choquantes leur venaient à l’esprit involontairement. Et bien sûr, plus on essaie de les repousser, plus elles restent, plus elles deviennent détaillées. Ça n’est même plus un éléphant qu’on essaie de ne pas voir dans la pièce, c’est un éléphant à poil qui fornique sous notre nez.

Je ne dis absolument pas que la religion donne des TOC: il existe énormément de croyants sur Terre, et beaucoup d’entre eux ne sont affectés d’aucun trouble psychologique notable. La religion n’est pas même forcément un élément déclencheur. Enfin, beaucoup d’athées souffrent de TOC. Mais la religion, la moralité et les TOC entretiennent toutefois des liens. Les TOC associés à la religion sont même une catégorie spécifique de TOC. De plus, certaines personnes peuvent n’avoir comme TOC que des TOC liés à leur foi : quand ils prient, pensent à Dieu, etc. Par exemple ces gens, au milieu d’une prière, vont avoir une pensée obscène, et se sentir abominablement mal à cause de ça. Ou ils vont penser à Dieu au moment le plus inapproprié, par exemple pendant un rapport sexuel ou en se masturbant. Je me rappelle que quand j’étais ado, j’avais toujours peur de ne pas « fermer » comme il faut mes prières du soir : je devais dire « Amen » le bon nombre de fois ou alors cela signifiait que Dieu continuerait d’écouter mes pensées alors que je commençais à penser à cet ami avec qui j’aurais tellement aimé qu’il se passe un truc. Un jour, je me souviens avoir lu une peur similaire dans la bande-dessinée Titeuf de Zep, et je me suis sentie si reconnaissante de ne pas être la seule. En même temps que tellement triste qu’on n’en parle jamais pour nous rassurer tous.

Oui, il faut qu’on parle de culpabilité et de religion. Et plus j’en entends parler, plus j’en suis convaincue. Il y a un épisode de la série Louie, par exemple, qui montre quels raisonnements cruels (mais plutôt réalistes, à mon avis) on utilise pour imposer aux enfants ce sentiment perpétuel de culpabilité, au nom du christianisme : à cause d’eux, Jésus est mort, à cause d’eux, nos vies sont un enfer, et la douleur, la perte et le deuil sont tous dûs à ce péché ignoble qu’ils ont commis au départ, d’être si cruels et arrogants. Pour l’amour du ciel, dans le documentaire Jesus Camp, on voit des mômes (des mômes !!!) être poussés, de manière sadique, à pleurer pour ce qu’ils (ils !!!) font subir aux fœtus avortés… (rappel : ils ne sont pas même en âge de procréer encore.)

On ne peut pas être catholique et nier que notre religion est fondée sur la volonté d’imposer culpabilité et honte aux êtres humains dès leur plus jeune âge. Certes, cela n’inclut pas toujours de la violence physique (cela dit n’oublions pas que c’est malheureusement le cas pour certains, dans le monde entier), mais le processus lui-même est violent.

N’essayez pas de me convaincre que « oui, mais ça vaut le coût ». Bien sûr que la religion peut vous apprendre l’empathie, l’amour, et donner du sens à votre vie. Mais ça n’est pas la question.

En definitive, voilà ce que je voudrais dire: tout comme pour les TOC, il est difficile de guérir vraiment de la religion. Oui, même si je suis moi-même catholique, j’emplois ce terme : « guérir ». Parce que quand votre unique volonté est d’être athée, et que les gens vous poussent à croire encore plus, cela peut réellement être considéré comme un trauma. Je connais des gens qui ont eu une éducation religieuse mais sont maintenant des athées revendiqués. Mais je sais aussi la trouble vérité dont ils détestent évidemment parler : ils n’ont jamais réussi à ôter toute culpabilité de leur esprit. De temps en temps, encore aujourd’hui, elle revient sous forme de pensée intrusive : « le sexe c’est mal », « l’homosexualité est contre nature », « la gourmandise est un péché », « être envieux est terrible, je suis une personne ignoble. » Même s’ils balaient ces idées quand elles se présentent, ils doivent quand même y faire face encore une fois. C’est quelque chose que les foyers d’athées s’épargnent. Ils n’y pensent même pas. Ça ne veut pas dire que leurs vies sont parfaites, mais, au moins sur ce plan, ils commencent dans la vie avec de la culpabilité en moins. Et, je sais pas… mais j’aimerais bien qu’on soit capables de parler de tout ça.

Top

Advertisements

Clichés of a Celebration Day

french flag pastel

It’s Easter. I’m still awaiting resurrection.

A year ago, it was my dad’s last day of life. It was our last day together, also, because we were sort of lucky.

I thought this weird feeling of not believing in his departure would fade away with time.

But now I use metaphors I abhorred, I still abhor. His departure. Fuck off, I say to myself, did you see any luggage? Nonetheless, this idea: clichés, in their laminated forms, surely help us to make the language of death more harmless.

Departure, death, ciao : I still feel the same. With the same intensity. The same painful surprise, every morning, after a few seconds when I still think all’s fine, he’s at home, I’ll call him later. That awareness which always comes too late, after having almost forgotten: well, no, not really… no…

Too tired over crying, after some time we’d rather not to.

Sadness, however? Sadness is the same. No doubt about that.

It doesn’t mean I’m not living. On the contrary, I take everything in with determination, I breathe life untouched straight into my lungs. You only live once, the saying goes, and so do I. I go everywhere I can, reminded that life’s short. Better to do something awesome with it. Better to live – no kidding – while still alive.

But he’s missed, my dad, he’s missed by us all. Just like we missed him 365 days ago, and I’m sure it’ll hold just as true in 10 years’ time.

On my mobile the phone number under that name still: ‘Parents’ mobile’. Even though it slides my rib cage open every time it comes up on the screen, I can’t change it. Bad metaphors come back at those times, when I consider editing contact: kill him twice, blah blah blah.



It’s Easter, and perhaps resurrection does exist, but then it is our own.


Because my mum came over for a few days, and during the last hours of a too-soon-morning-turned yesterday, I felt yes I did the strength she sent me. I hope she left with the one I gave her. Her flight has landed, my parents, I told you already, always pass through the sky.


Clichés des jours de fête

C’est Pâques. Et la résurrection je l’attends encore.

Il y a un an, c’était le dernier jour de vie de mon père. C’était notre dernier jour ensemble, aussi, car dans le fond, on avait cette chance.

J’ai cru que ce sentiment bizarre de ne pas vraiment croire à son départ s’atténuerait avec le temps.


Et maintenant j’emploie parfois des métaphores que je détestais, que je déteste toujours. Son départ. Non mais ta gueule, je me dis, où est-ce que t’as vu des valises? Mais les clichés, dans leurs formules plastifiées, nous aident peut-être à rendre plus inoffensif le langage de la mort.

Départ, décès, ciao : je ressens toujours la même chose. Avec la même intensité. Le même étonnement douloureux, chaque matin, après ces quelques secondes où je crois encore que tout va bien, qu’il est vivant chez lui, que je l’appellerai plus tard. La prise de conscience qui vient toujours trop tard, après avoir eu le temps de quasi oublier : ah ben en fait, attends, … non…

On se fatigue de pleurer, on finit par ne plus.

Mais la tristesse? La tristesse, pas de doute. C’est la même.

Ça ne veut pas dire que je ne vis pas. Au contraire, déterminée je prends tout dans les poumons. Je profite comme on dit, ça m’a rappelé s’il le fallait encore que la vie passait vite. Autant en faire une expérience de dingue, autant – sans déconner – vivre de son vivant.

Mais il manque, mon père, il nous manque à tous, comme il y a 365 jours, et je parie que ce sera pareil dans dix ans.

Sur mon portable le numéro de téléphone encore sous ce nom : « Parents portable ». Et même si ça me fend la cage thoracique à chaque fois que ça s’affiche sur l’écran, je ne parviens pas à le changer. Des métaphores à la con reviennent à ces moments-là où j’envisage de modifier le contact : le tuer deux fois, bla bla bla.

C’est Pâques et la résurrection peut-être bien qu’elle existe, mais alors c’est la nôtre.

Parce que ma mère est venue quelques jours, et que lors des dernières heures d’un hier passé trop vite, j’ai bien senti qu’elle m’envoyait de la force. J’espère qu’elle a emmené celle que je lui donnais. L’avion a bien atterri, mes parents je me tue à vous le dire ils passent toujours par le ciel.

Top

A Believer not Believing in Death – nor in the After-Death. I’ve Lost Religion’s Directions for Use.

french flag pastel

Hey Dad! Okay for the ceremonies and all, since that’s the way we do it, but there’s a problem here. I don’t believe in death. Really, I don’t. I believe none of it. Death doesn’t exist.

Wait. It’s not that I’m currently playing the conspiracy tune, Elvis- or Mickael-Jackson-style. I’m not saying you’re still out there, dressed anonymously or something like that. It’s not denial either, I assure you, I understood everything. I don’t need it re-explained. It was tough enough the first time.

Wait, still. I’m not saying either that I don’t believe in death because I believe in life after death or something like that. No. I don’t.

It’s just that death, death like: ‘look! that was the end’, my mind just doesn’ take it. I don’t know if it’s the same for others, but to me being dead means nothing, apart from: ‘I don’t know how to say it so I’ll talk about a concept, death, so that you stop asking questions’. The other day someone told me: I understand what you’re saying there, I don’t really believe in death either; so I thought to myself maybe we’re more than a couple people thinking like that.

Not believing in death isn’t a recent feature for me, don’t think it’s because I’ve taken too much Prozac as of lately. I’ve always had a problem with that. It’s not some sort of very well-timed self-protection trick because I miss you too much. I was about five, in my bed, sobbing and whining. I ended up going to the living room to ask Mom: ‘Mom, what does it feel like when we’re dead?’ I wasn’t sobbing because of death, no, I was sobbing because I couldn’t imagine it. She asked: ‘why are you asking such a thing?’ I said it was because I’d been trying to imagine not breathing not moving not thinking and it didn’t work. I just couldn’t picture it. You see, Dad, it’s not against you, it’s not that I’m disrespectful, even Mom couldn’t answer me. She told me: ‘I don’t know. Come and stay here, if you like’.

You know it’s a bit like you, you’ve always said: ‘I only believe what I see’. It’s the same thing. My brain, as far as I can remember it anyway, has only ever experienced living, it has only seen an existing process. Not to exist, my brain has no clue what it means. I try and try again, but there’s only life in there. Sure I’ve seen motionless bodies – the world almost entirely consists of them. There’s a difference however between bodies, corpses even, and non-living. The difference is my mind saying: yes, but death doesn’t exist.

The problem, Dad, is that I can carry on writing texts about how we accept – or don’t accept at all indeed – someone’s death. The truth is, I don’t think I’m massively legitimate here. It’s not really honest, because: death? I’ve no clue about it. I don’t even believe in it. It’s just a never-ending absence.

I don’t stare at my phone every night hoping you’d call. Don’t worry Dad, I’ve understood them all: the doctors’ words, the speech in the church. Nonetheless, every night, there’s this waiting process – itself aware of its uselessness – of you not calling. I’m not waiting for you to call. Yet each day must demonstrate that you will no longer call.


Dad, it’s not even that I’m then disappointed. To be disappointed, one has to believe in something first. I don’t believe in death, nor do I believe in resurrection.
Yet I’m a catholic. Well I think I am. So I’m wondering why is religion for in such cases. I don’t believe that you’ll come back, but I don’t believe either that you’ve left your body and the entire universe. I just know that I’ll never see you again, just as if you’d gone very very far, without providing an address, and that we’d forever be unable to find you now.

Yes, Dad, I know I’m talking to you here. I’m aware of that, don’t worry. You see I don’t believe in death, nor in the after-death, but I do believe in words.


Une croyante qui ne croit ni en la mort, ni en l’après non plus : la religion, j’ai perdu la notice.

Dis, papa. Les cérémonies, d’accord, puisque c’est comme ça qu’on fait, mais y a quand même un léger problème. Moi la mort j’y crois pas. Non mais vraiment. J’y crois que dalle à la mort, rien, zéro. La mort ça n’existe pas.

Attends. C’est pas que je nous fais un remix des complots style Elvis ou Mickael Jackson, non, je ne dis pas que tu es encore là, déguisé ou je ne sais quoi. C’est pas du déni, non, j’ai bien compris, j’ai pas besoin qu’on me réexplique, ça a fait assez mal la première fois merci.

Attends encore. C’est pas non plus que je dis la mort j’y crois pas car je crois à la vie après la mort ou un délire comme ça, non. Je n’y crois pas non plus.

C’est juste que la mort tout court, la mort-regarde-c’est-fini, mon esprit accroche pas. Je ne sais pas si dans la tête des autres c’est pareil mais pour moi, ça ne veut rien dire mourir, à part : « je sais pas te l’expliquer alors je vais te dire ça, utiliser un concept qui s’appelle la mort, histoire que tu arrêtes de poser des questions ». L’autre jour on m’a dit je comprends, moi non plus la mort j’y crois pas trop, alors je me suis dit on est peut-être plus que deux-trois à le penser.

Ne pas croire à la mort ce n’est pas un truc récent pour moi, va pas croire que c’est mon trop plein de Prozac, j’ai toujours eu un souci avec ça. Ça n’est pas un moyen de défense qui arrive à point nommé parce que tu me manques trop. J’avais cinq ans, plus ou moins, et je chialais dans mon lit. J’avais fini par aller dans le salon demander à maman : « maman, ça fait quoi quand on est mort ? » Je ne pleurais pas de la mort, non, je pleurais de pas arriver à me l’imaginer. Elle m’a dit « pourquoi tu poses des questions comme ça ? » Je lui ai répondu parce que j’essaie de m’imaginer plus respirer plus bouger plus penser et ça ne marche pas, dans ma tête je ne le vois pas. Tu vois papa, ça n’est pas contre toi, ça n’est pas que je ne respecte pas, mais même maman elle n’avait pas su me dire. Elle m’avait dit « je sais pas. Viens, reste là, si tu veux ».

Tu sais c’est un peu comme toi, tu disais tout le temps « je ne crois que ce que je vois ». Ben tu vois c’est pareil. Moi mon cerveau, de ce que je me souvienne, il n’a vécu que la vie, il n’a vu que d’exister, pas exister il ne sait pas ce que c’est. J’ai beau faire des efforts, il y a que de la vie là-dedans. Bien sûr j’ai vu des corps qui ne bougeaient pas, sans rire, le monde n’est plein que de ça presque, mais il y a une différence entre des corps qui ne bougent plus et pas de vie – il y a mon esprit qui dit : oui, mais la mort, ça n’existe pas.

Papa, le problème c’est que je veux bien écrire des textes sur comment on accepte la perte de quelqu’un, ou même à quel point on ne l’accepte pas, mais en vrai, papa, je suis sûrement pas bien placée pour le faire. Ce n’est pas honnête, parce que la mort moi j’en sais rien. C’est juste une absence qui ne s’arrête pas.

Ça n’est pas que je regarde mon téléphone tous les soirs en espérant que tu m’appelles. Non papa, les mots des médecins, j’ai bien compris, les mots à l’église pareil. Mais c’est que tous les soirs, il y a comme cette attente, qui se sait inutile, du fait que justement tu ne téléphoneras pas. Je n’attends pas que tu appelles, mais c’est comme si chaque jour devait me prouver que tu n’appelleras plus.

Papa, ça n’est même pas une attente déçue. Parce que pour se sentir déçu il faut croire à quelque chose, et si je ne crois pas à la mort, je crois pas non plus à la résurrection.
Pourtant je suis catholique, enfin je crois. Du coup je me demande bien à quoi sert la religion dans ces cas-là. Je crois pas que tu reviendras, mais je ne crois pas non plus que t’es parti de tout l’univers en entier. C’est juste comme si on m’avait dit que je ne te reverrai plus jamais, comme si tu étais parti loin très loin sans laisser d’adresse, et qu’on ne puisse jamais te retrouver.

Oui papa, je sais que je m’adresse à toi, là, oui je remarque, t’inquiète pas. Mais tu vois si la mort j’y crois pas, ni à la vie après la mort non plus, les mots par contre j’y crois fort.

Top